5 Questions with...Rowdy Gaines

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5 Questions with...Rowdy Gaines

CSN Chicago Senior Director of Communications
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the city's most popular personalities on the spot with everyone's favorite local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

On Wednesdays, exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeks special guest ... one of the greatest U.S. Olympians ever, whose athletic skills and dedication to winning propelled him to set multiple swimming world records in the 1980sviewers will be seeing plenty of him during the upcoming Summer Olympic Games in London, as he is the primary swimming and open water analyst for NBC Sports over 5,500 hours of total Olympics coverage via its television and digital outlets ... a great athlete (with Chicago ties no less!), but an even better person for everything he does in the charitable community, here are 5 Questions with ... ROWDY GAINES!

BIO: One of the worlds fastest swimmers in the 1980s, Ambrose Rowdy Gaines IV now ranks as the most experienced television analyst in the sport. At the 2012 Olympic Summer Games in London, Gaines will serve as an analyst for swimming and open water. He has been NBCs Olympic swimming analyst since the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Gaines set world records in the 100-meter freestyle in 1981, the 200-meter freestyle in 1982 and capped off his phenomenal career by winning three gold medals for the United States at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. After entering the 1984 Olympic trials as a past his prime long-shot to make the team, he set an Olympic record in the 100-meter freestyle, and helped establish a world record by anchoring the 4100-meter freestyle relay team. He completed the gold-medal triple by swimming the freestyle anchor of the 4100-meter medley, again setting Olympic and world records. Gaines also was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic Team, which did not compete in Moscow because of the U.S. boycott.

After retiring, Gaines turned to broadcasting, and will be calling his sixth Olympic Games as the expert analyst of swimming for NBC's broadcast of the Olympic Games in London this year.

Named the World Swimmer of the Year in 1981, Gaines was an eight-time NCAA champion at Auburn University and was honored as the Southeastern Conferences Athlete of the Year in 1981. He is a member of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame and later served as the Hall's Executive Director. Gaines also served as the Chief Fundraising and Alumni Officer at USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport in the U.S.

In addition to parenting and broadcasting, Gaines volunteers for the United Cerebral Palsy Foundation. He also is on the Board of Directors of Swim Across America, an organization designed to raise funds for cancer research.

Gaines is the Executive Director of Rowdy's Kidz, a wellness initiative developed and supported by The Limu Company that reaches out to children across the country.

Gaines and his wife, Judy, reside in Lake Mary, Fla., with their four daughters.

1) CSNChicago.com: Rowdy, it's a great honor having you in the spotlight for this special edition of CSNChicago.coms 5 Questions with ... As one of the greatest Olympic athletes in U.S. history, along with being the lead analyst for NBC Sports 2012 London Summer Games swimming and open-water coverage, let's start off with this one: In your opinion, how has your sport changed in terms of athlete preparation/training over the years since your record-setting performances during in the 1980s?

Gaines: Thank you Comcast SportsNet Chicago! I have a lot of roots in Chi-Town! My father lived there for 25 years and sister is still there, so it's my second home.

Swimming has changed dramatically since I retired in 1984. Diet is a big one of course, but also the training now is much more specific to the event and stroke you swim. There is a lot more testing done to help the athletes monitor their training routine, but the biggest change of all has been money. The athlete can now make a living swimming where in 1984 you couldn't. In fact, when I won in 1984, I became the fourth-oldest swimmer in history to win a gold medal at 25 ... and now the average age for the men's team going into London is 26!

2) CSNChicago.com: It may be a tall order for the U.S. Olympic men's swim team to duplicate the amazing run of medals they garnered during the 2008 Games in Beijing (scoring ten world records no less), but they do have the one guy that all eyes will be watching once again: the one and only Michael Phelps. What's your prediction for this year's team and can Phelps rack up a gold in every event he's in this go-around?

Gaines: USA has a great team with many veterans like Phelps leading the way, but 28 out of the 49 swimming Olympians this year are first-timers, so it's a very young team. Michael will definitely win a lot of golds in London, but that perfect storm of 2008 will be hard to duplicate. Going 8-for-8 will be impossible in one way because he is only swimming seven events, but the world is a much tougher place thanks largely to Michael. Everyone had to ramp it up if they were going to try and compete with him. I think we are set for an epic duel between Phelps and Ryan Lochte, who has been the best swimmer in the world the last three years. They will swim against each other in two events (200 and 400 IM) but will have to swim WITH each other in possibly two relays ... rivals and teammates!

On the women's side, keep an eye out for Missy Franklin. She is a sensational young 17-year-old who is swimming seven events and has a legitimate shot of winning seven medals, something a female swimmer has never done in Olympics history.

3) CSNChicago.com: You've been a part of NBC Sports Olympic coverage since the '96 Games in Atlanta. How much preparation goes into your broadcasts? Walk us through that process.

Gaines: Good lord, do you have a couple of hours?! It takes a lot of studying and a lot of preparation, but i'ts something I enjoy because I love the sport so much. We go to France on July 20 to hang out with Team USA at their training camp for a couple of days and then go to London July 23 for rehearsals, meetings and more studying before it all begins July 28 when I will be at the pool from about 7am until well after 11pm for eight straight days. We will call some of the prelims and then finals at night. We have an amazing team with our producer Tommy Roy, director Drew Escoff, the greatest play-by-play man/wonderful friend Dan Hicks and so many others who make my job so much easier.

4) CSNChicago.com: As you well know, our city of Chicago lost out on their chance of hosting the 2016 Summer Games. Did we ever have a legit shot in your mind?

Gaines: I really did think Chicago was the single best bid city and felt they deserved to host those games. And I thought they were going to be the front runner. It wasn't in the cards I guess with the IOC and, although Rio will do a great job, I still think the powers that be will be sorry that they did not choose Chicago.

5) CSNChicago.com: It has to be acknowledged that you're a great leader in giving back to the community via all your charity endeavors. Were interested in hearing more about Rowdy's Kidz. Explain what that organization is all about.

Gaines: I work for the best company in the world, LIMU! When I started to work for them full time five years ago, our owner and CEO Gary Raser came to me and said he wanted to make difference in young children's lives. So he came up with the idea of Rowdy's Kidz. It is the charitable arm of our company where I am able to go all over the country and do free swim clinics for kids (and sometimes adults!) who wouldn't normally be able to afford having an Olympian come and do something like this.

I not only do the clinic, but I get to go various schools in the community, as well as children's hospitals. I didn't start swimming until I was 17, so my message is it's never too late to achieve your dreams because I'm living proof of that. I talk about living a healthy lifestyle because that is what we are all about as a company. I have loved every minute of it and my family and I are fortunate to be living our dream every day.

Gaines LINKS:

Official Rowdy Gaines website

NBCOlympics.com

Rowdys Kidz organizationinformation

Rowdy Gaines on Facebook

Rowdy Gaines on Twitter

Northwestern quarterback Clayton Thorson gets some love from NFL Draft guru Mel Kiper Jr.

Northwestern quarterback Clayton Thorson gets some love from NFL Draft guru Mel Kiper Jr.

Is Northwestern becoming QB U?

Trevor Siemian and Mike Kafka have already been drafted this decade, and Clayton Thorson — the team's current signal-caller — could be next.

ESPN's noted NFL Draft guru Mel Kiper Jr. ranked Thorson as one of his top five underclassman quarterbacks ahead of the 2018 draft.

Now that doesn't mean much right now. Kiper himself dubbed his position-by-position rankings as "way too early." Thorson's stock could soar or fall depending on what happens next season. And Thorson will still have one season of NCAA eligibility remaining after the upcoming 2017 campaign, meaning he might not even be in the 2018 NFL Draft.

But it's solid praise for a quarterback who looked much better in his second season as the Wildcats' starter than he did as a redshirt freshman the year prior.

As a redshirt sophomore, Thorson completed 58.6 percent of his passes for 3,182 yards and 22 touchdowns (fourth in the Big Ten in both of those categories) compared to nine interceptions. Thorson also rushed in for five touchdowns on the ground.

His quarterback rating skied from 95.9 as a freshman to 125.9 as a sophomore.

Now, there's little telling where Kiper might rank Thorson among all quarterbacks for the 2018 draft. He ranked five seniors and five underclassmen, with Thorson ranked fifth among underclassmen, behind Southern California's Sam Darnold, Wyoming's Josh Allen, UCLA's Josh Rosen and Louisville's Lamar Jackson, the reigning Heisman Trophy winner.

But certainly the Northwestern quarterback has captured the attention of draft evaluators and could follow Siemian and Kafka as recent Wildcats signal-callers to hear their name during the draft.

Jose Quintana rocked as White Sox swept by Diamondbacks

Jose Quintana rocked as White Sox swept by Diamondbacks

PHOENIX -- Jose Quintana looked as if he might be on the way to a second consecutive gem on Wednesday afternoon before it quickly took a turn for the worse.

After three perfect frames, Quintana got hit hard in the middle innings and was forced out of the contest. The Arizona Diamondbacks offense awoke from an early slumber against Quintana to complete a sweep of the White Sox, who fell 8-6 in front of 18,002 at Chase Field. The eight earned runs allowed by Quintana are the most he has yielded in a start in two years.

None of what transpired in the first three innings Wednesday offered any indication of what was to come. Quintana picked up where he’d left off on Friday night in Seattle when he combined with David Robertson on a one-hitter.  

His offspeed was diving and Diamondbacks hitters had no chance. Quintana induced checked swing after checked swing and racked up five strikeouts in three innings. He even made a smooth defensive play on Gregor Blanco’s bunt-base hit attempt to start the fourth inning with the White Sox leading 2-0.

But then it all went south.

Nick Ahmed doubled to left and red-hot Paul Goldschmidt doubled to deep center to make it a 2-1 game before Chris Owings tied it with an RBI single. Things only got worse for Quintana in the fifth inning when he hit the first hitter Brandon Drury with a 1-2 pitch. Quintana then left a 1-0 fastball over the middle and Jake Lamb didn’t miss the mistake, driving it the opposite way for a two-run homer and a 4-2 lead. Four batters later, Ahmed doubled in a pair and the rout was on. Goldschmidt’s single knocked Quintana from the game.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your White Sox tickets here]

Owings had a sac fly off Anthony Swarzak to score one inherited run and Drury singled in the other to put Arizona ahead by six.

Quintana allowed eight hits and struck out seven. The eight runs he allowed were the most he’d allowed in a start since the Detroit Tigers tagged him for nine runs on April 19, 2015.

The poor outing raised Quintana’s earned run-average by nearly a point from 3.92 to 4.82. Even though it’s still more than two months until the Aug. 1 nonwaiver trade deadline, Quintana’s inconsistent start to the season has also almost certainly harmed his perceived trade value. Not only has Quintana pitched poorly, but shifts in the plans of other clubs could provide contending teams with more trade options. However, with teams still focused on the upcoming draft and the deadline a way off, Quintana has more than enough time to get back on track.

One player who has continued to stay hot for more than a month now is first baseman Jose Abreu, who blasted his 100 th homer on Tuesday night. For an encore, Abreu matched his career high with four hits, including a two-run homer in the sixth inning that got the White Sox to within 8-4.

Melky Cabrera had an RBI groundout in the seventh inning and Abreu singled in another to make it an 8-6 game. But the White Sox would get no closer.

Leury Garcia’s solo homer in the second inning gave the White Sox an early lead. Abreu doubled in the fourth and scored on a double play to make it a 2-0 lead.

From April 19th on, Abreu is hitting .347/.404/.677 with 10 home runs and 22 RBIs in 136 plate appearances. He’s currently on pace for 36 home runs, which would tie the career high he established in 2014.