5 Questions with...'Caddyshack's' Cindy Morgan

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5 Questions with...'Caddyshack's' Cindy Morgan

By Jeff Nuich
CSN Chicago Senior Director of CommunicationsCSNChicago.com Contributor

February 10, 2010

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the citys most popular personalities on the spot with everyones favorite weekly local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

Every Wednesday exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeka very special edition of 5 Questions with as we interview a Chicago born and raised actress who is a huge part of movie comedy history as she portrayed the vivacious vixen Lacey Underall in the quintessential sports comedy film Caddyshackto no ones surprise, shes still a beauty to this dayhere are 5 Questions withCINDY MORGAN!

BIO: Best known as "Lacey Underall" in CADDYSHACK, and "Yori" in TRON, Cindy Morgan was born Cynthia Ann Cichorski on September 29 in Chicago, IL, not far from Wrigley Field. The daughter of a Polish factory worker and German mother, Cindy survived 12 years of Catholic school and was the first in her family to attend college.

While studying communications at Northern Illinois University, Cindy spun records on the radio. A commercial station in town wanted her to report the news for them as well, and so a slight deception was needed. She used the name Cindy Morgan, taken from a story Cindy read about Morgan le Fay when she was twelve years old.

After graduation, Cindy gave all the latest meteorological news on a TV station in Rockford, Ill. She also kept her hand in radio by working the graveyard shift at a local rock station. Then she returned to Chicago and deejayed on WSDM (now WLUP). During a labor dispute at the station, she literally quit on the air and walked out with a record still spinning on the turntable.

She found employment at auto shows for Fiat, which took her to both coasts. Cindy moved to Los Angeles in 1978, and became the Irish Spring girl. While she did TV commercials, she studied acting, and was rewarded with her first screen role in CADDYSHACK, playing the role of Lacey Underall, an over-amorous ingnue.

Disney made film history with TRON, the first computer-generated film. Cindy played two characters: Lora, a computer programmer in the "real" world, and Yori, her alter-ego in the film's computer generated flights of imagination.

Cindy Morgan's television credits to date include "Falconcrest", "The Larry Sanders Show", "Amazing Stories" and "Bring 'Em Back Alive".

Cindy also associate-produced five films with Larry Estes, best known for "Sex, Lies and Videotape".

She's now finishing her first book, a story about how a nice Catholic girl became Lacey Underall in CADDYSHACK.

1) CSNChicago.com: Cindy, thanks for taking time to be interviewed for CSNChicago.coms 5 Questions with Its a thrill for us and our readers and its certainly appreciated. Now lets get down to itWhen Caddyshack was first released in the theaters in 1980, it was far from being a favorite with critics nationwide and performed only moderately well at the box office. Then something happened in the years to follow. The film is now considered to be one of the all-time great comedies and easily the best sports comedy movie ever made. In your opinion, what transpired over the years that made your film grow to its current fanatic cult status and why do you think it continues to resonate with young movie fans to this day?

Morgan: I remember asking how to know if something's really good (a song, a film, or even a good restaurant) and I was told that it would stand the test of time. Caddyshack has stood the test of time, and has grown in popularity over the years, as each new generation discovers it (probably in their father's DVD collection).

It has a timeless quality about it, because we were really having the best time possible. You can't fake that! We were lucky enough to be surrounded by four of the funniest men on the planet: Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, Ted Knight and Rodney Dangerfield. And we were struck by comedy lightning.

2) CSNChicago.com: We all have our favorite scenes in Caddyshack, with many of us still able to recite lines from Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Bill Murray and, of course, Cindy Morgan. What scene from your film still makes you laugh out loud to this day?
Morgan: I love watching the scene where I ask Chevy to "Sing me a love song." It wasn't in the script, wasn't rehearsed or even discussed ahead of time. Chevy plays a few bars, and then he snorts the salt. You can see me take a couple of beats while I realize what's happening, and that this would be a scene in the film. I had a big wad of gum in my mouth, and blew a bubble at him.

3) CSNChicago.com: In your daily life, we can imagine you are constantly subjected to Caddyshack-related references (this interview included!). Does the fielding of these questions from interviewers and fans ever get as tiresome as Dreary Old Manhattan?

Morgan: Fielding these questions is so much fun that I'm putting together a nice little book called "From Catholic School to Caddyshack.

4) CSNChicago.com: What sports did you enjoy playing growing up and, a follow-up question, do you still keep tabs on the Chicago teams you grew up watching?

Morgan: Catholic girls school had a limited sports program when I attended, but you couldn't keep me from watching games with my father. I still watch the Bears, the Bulls and my beloved Cubs. I heard there was a Super Bowl a few days ago, but since none of the aforementioned teams played in it, that must have been a rumor.

5) CSNChicago.com: Were proud to say you were born and raised in our great city. What do you miss most about Chicago, how often do you make it back here and, when youre in town, name the one restaurant thats a cant miss during your visit?

Morgan: Thank you, and I'm damn proud to be from Chicago too. I miss the people from Chicago! I miss Wrigley Field, the Hancock Center (where I worked as a DJ), I miss Marshall Fields and I miss my Dad, Mitch Cichorski, who used to be the plant manager for Stewart Warner on Diversey Avenue. When I visit Chicago, I can't miss the Mushroom Barley soup at the White Eagle restaurant on North Milwaukee Avenue.

BONUS QUESTIONCSNChicago.com: You mentioned youre writing a book about your experiences in Caddyshack. Tell us about that and when can we expect it to hit the in-store and online bookstores? It will no doubt be a great read!
Morgan: I'm hoping that "From Catholic School to Caddyshack" will be out by early summer. Make sure to visit my website for the latest information on that. Thanks again for having me as your guest this week and a big kiss to everyone in Chicago!

Morgan LINKS:

Official Cindy Morgan website

Cindy Morgan Web Store (authentic autographed memorabilia)

Cindy Morgan on Facebook

Cindy Morgan on Twitter

Cindy Morgan on MySpace

Cindy Morgan on IMDB

Report: Rutgers' Janarion Grant to miss remainder of season with injury

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Report: Rutgers' Janarion Grant to miss remainder of season with injury

The worst-case scenario appears to have struck for Rutgers and star playmaker Janarion Grant.

Grant, who is an ever-dangerous scoring threat in multiple phases of the game, was injured after taking a catch 76 yards inside the five-yard line in Saturday's loss to Iowa. According to a Sunday report from NJ.com's Ryan Dunleavy, the injury will knock Grant out for the remainder of the season.

Grant had his ankle stepped on at the end of that long run and sat out the rest of Saturday's game.

The blow is obviously a crushing one for the Scarlet Knights. Grant is the team's best and most dangerous player. A star return man, he's played a big role on offense this season, as well. In four games, Grant racked up 138 rushing yards, 210 receiving yards, 112 punt-return yards and 195 kick-return yards. He scored six total touchdowns: three rushing, one via a punt return, one via a kick return and one touchdown throw.

A senior, Grant's collegiate career could be over due to the injury. He could apply for a medical hardship waiver, though already appearing in four games this season, it's potentially unlikely that he would receive one from the NCAA.

In his four-year career, Grant has totaled 2,606 kick-return yards (five touchdowns), 895 receiving yards (one touchdown), 480 punt-return yards (three touchdowns) and 270 rushing yards (three touchdowns).

Adding more bad news for the Knights, Dunleavy also reported that wide receiver Quanzell Lambert is out for the season, as well.

After firing Brian VanGorder, Brian Kelly puts onus on coaches to fix Irish defense

After firing Brian VanGorder, Brian Kelly puts onus on coaches to fix Irish defense

Brian Kelly, before Sunday, hadn’t fired an assistant coach since coming to Notre Dame nearly seven years ago. But faced with a 1-3 record and an uncertain defensive future, Kelly came to the conclusion that a change at defensive coordinator was necessary to Notre Dame’s chances of turning around a season headed in the wrong direction. 

And with that, Brian VanGorder is out. Greg Hudson, who previously was a defensive analyst and Purdue’s defensive coordinator from 2013-2015, is in. But what does Kelly want to see out of a defense that ranks at or near the bottom of the FBS level in so many defensive statistics and has been the main culprit in losses to Texas, Michigan State and Duke?

The first step, Kelly said on his teleconference Sunday, is injecting something enjoyable into an Irish defense that VanGorder defended in August as “likable and learnable.” 

“Guys played hard, but we lacked some of the energy and enthusiasm and fun, quite frankly, that you need to have when you're playing on defense,” Kelly said. 

Maybe better energy will result in better tackling, a fundamental area that’s been a glaring problem for this defense in 2016. Kelly said last week his defensive players were “anxious,” which contributed to the the team’s tackling problem. Better coaching, of course, would help there as well. 

But adding energy is sort of a nebulous, impossible-to-quantify concept. More concrete will be the tweaks to the defensive scheme and moving a few players into different positions to maximize their ability. 

Kelly said the terminology of the defense will remain the same, which makes sense given the installation process for VanGorder’s scheme began back during spring practice. Changing the terminology, Kelly said, would “pull the rug underneath the kids at this point in the season.”

What there will be, Kelly said, is a different focus trained on parts of the defense that have been installed but maybe not utilized frequently. 

“There's a lot,” Kelly said. “There's a very vast library that is easily tapped into from a different perspective, different terminology in terms of what has not been leaned on heavily in terms of fronts and coverages, but it's already installed.

“So there's a vast library. There's a lot there. I'm going to send around some of the things I believe our guys will feel comfortable with, and we'll go from there.”

Kelly dismissed the notion that VanGorder installed too much into his defensive scheme, but said he, Hudson and Irish coaches will “streamline” things to allow players to be fundamentally sound and play with that kind of speed and energy necessary. 

Kelly said, too, that he and his coaching staff will meet Sunday to discuss personnel changes — both from getting certain guys on the field (like defensive end Jay Hayes, who Kelly specifically addressed) and getting others into better positions to make plays. 

“We think that there might be some validity to moving around a couple of players,” Kelly said. “So that will be a conversation that I begin a little bit later this afternoon.”

It’s too early to tell what Notre Dame’s defense will look like on Saturday against Syracuse at MetLife Stadium, but what’s clear is that a turnaround is necessary — and it’s needed immediately. At 1-3, with three games left against teams ranked in the top 15 of S&P+ (home games against Stanford, Miami and Virginia Tech), Notre Dame doesn’t have much margin for error if it wants to reach a bowl game in 2016. 

The defense has made plenty of errors so far, to the point where Kelly took a step he never had in South Bend. Streamlining things, getting that energy back, tweaking the scheme — whatever it is, Notre Dame needs solutions on defense. 

Those solutions weren’t coming with VanGorder and now have to come with Hudson, as well as Kelly taking a more involved supervisor role in the defense. 

“It starts with the coaches,” Kelly said. “I think it's got to be coach-led and they have got to start the fire. And then those players that have that intrinsic motivation, that fire within, they will come along with us. Those that don't, we're going to leave them along the side. But this is going to start with the coaches.”