Another winner in the Lenti family

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Another winner in the Lenti family

Gena Lenti considers herself to be a perfectionist. Nothing less than an A-plus is acceptable, whether the subject is AP biology or pre-calculus or Spanish or basketball or softball. Her worst grade in four years of high school? An A-minus in choir as a freshman.

"I am a perfectionist. I always have been more competitive with myself than others," said Lenti, a senior at St. Ignatius College Prep. "I strive for A-plus, not just A on a test. If you look at my grades, you might consider me a nerd. But I can't let myself slack off. I tried this year but I can't do it. I just think of what I can do to make myself better."

She comes from a very competitive family. Her father Eugene coaches a nationally ranked softball team at DePaul. Her mother Candace played on a state championship basketball team at York and played softball at DePaul.

Aunt Jeanne Lenti Ponsetto is athletic director at DePaul. Uncle Frank, the head football coach at Mount Carmel, has won more games and state championships than any coach in state history. Uncle David is Frank's longtime defensive coordinator.

When the big Italian family gathers on Thanksgiving Day at the Ponsetto house near the DePaul campus, there are 27 in all...at least two turkeys, casseroles, stuffing, appetizers, desserts. Before sitting down to dinner, however, they adjourn for a family basketball game. To Gena's regret, the table conversation isn't reserved for sports only.

"The big question after 'How is the season going?' is 'How are the boyfriends going these days?' I try to avoid the question at all costs. I try to keep my family out of my social business as much as possible," she said.

But Gena, who has committed to play softball for her father at DePaul, has added another paragraph to her impressive resume that surely will be a topic of discussion at the next family gathering.

The 17-year-old senior has been named to the Illinois High School Association's 2011-12 All-State Academic Team. She is one of 26 student-athletes selected from among 450 nominees who will be honored at the annual banquet in Bloomington on April 16.

She carries a 4.32 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale and scored 30 on her ACT. She was the leading scorer on her basketball team this season and plays shortstop on the softball team. She hopes to improve on last year's .450 batting average, then will take her skills to DePaul.

"She always had a competitive nature in anything she did, sports or academics," her father recalled. "When she was 4 or 5, we'd play any game and I'd have to find a way to cheat so we could go to bed. She wanted to play until she won. I knew when she was 12 or 13 that she had the skill and drive to be successful in college."

When she was 10, her father converted her from a right-handed to a left-handed hitter to use her speed as a slapper, an Ichiro Suzuki-type hitter. She would show up at her father's games to take extra swings. Always fearless, she once broke an arm when diving for a ball in the outfield.

"I never thought I wouldn't play sports in college," she said. "I love basketball. If you gave me a choice, I would play basketball in college. But I'm better at softball.

"Softball can become boring at times. There is a lot of standing. Basketball is full of action. I can see where my work pays off more in basketball. Softball isn't as fast-paced, not as much action. I put more heart into basketball. It's a longer season and there is more time to bond with my team."

But her mother and two sisters played softball. And her father has coached the game for 32 years. She knew she wasn't tall enough to play basketball--and probably wouldn't get any taller. Her father is 5-foot-8 and her mother is 5-foot-5.

"There were times when I was young that I said I would go to DePaul to play softball for my dad. I thought it was guaranteed when I was younger but I knew it wasn't guaranteed," Gena said.

She recalls the day when her father asked her: "Would you want to play for me? We're starting to recruit your class." They were driving home after a game in a travel league tournament and Gena was mad at herself. She had played badly, struck out a few times and couldn't even put the ball in play with runners on base.

"I went off to the car and sat alone. On the way home, it was quiet. I didn't want to talk. My dad brought it up," she said. "After that game, I didn't think he'd be thinking of me. For sure, I'd be interested in going to DePaul. But I didn't think I was good enough.

"I saw there were other girls in my class who were very good, other kids my age, kids who only played softball while I was playing two sports, girls who were faster and stronger and had better arms.

"But my dad treated me like other recruits. I got letters in the mail signed 'Coach Lenti.' I was invited to visit the campus. I made unofficial and official visits. I toured the campus, saw the dorms for the first time, the science building, the quadrangle.

"He knew I was coming. I wasn't thinking of anywhere else. I chose DePaul because it is the best softball school I could go to. I didn't seek out anyone else. I looked at myself and felt I was going to the best school I could go to. And I wanted to stay close to my family."

Gena loves Chicago, especially the Downtown area. She rides her bicycle to North Avenue beach two or three times a week during the summer. She also prefers the Flat Top Grill at Southport and Belmont.

"I am the kind of person who doesn't like free time," she said. "I don't want a lot of TV and I don't go to movies. I have to balance school and sports and my social life."

Gena's day begins at 6 a.m. on school days. Breakfast is eggs or cereal. She car pools with two friends and arrives at St. Ignatius at 7:30a.m. Classes begin at 8 a.m. AP Biology, her favorite. Dance, pre-calculus, film, journalism, religion, Spanish. Then basketball or softball practice for two hours after school. Afterward, during the basketball season, she went to DePaul for a shootaround. During the softball season, she takes extra swings at a homemade hitting station in her basement. Then homework for at least two hours.

"I push myself too hard in sports and academics," she said. "Going into my senior year, knowing I was going to DePaul, my parents suggested that I should ease off. They gave me permission not to take a lot of AP classes, to enjoy myself more. But I am a perfectionist. I can't let myself slack off. I tried but I can't do it."

But she concedes that it is more difficult to be a perfectionist in softball. Her father reminds her that hitting is a losing battle, that you're always below .500, that the majority of the time you won't hit the ball safety, that major league baseball players with .300 batting averages are in the Hall of Fame.

"It is a mental game," she said. "You have to come back the next game if you strike out five times in the past game. You have to be mentally tougher. My dad said I have to have a swagger. My goal this spring is to hit higher than .450 and focus on fewer errors and more stolen bases."

So she'll have something to talk about next Thanksgiving.

Huskers on wrong end of home-field advantage vs. Tennessee in Music City Bowl

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USA TODAY

Huskers on wrong end of home-field advantage vs. Tennessee in Music City Bowl

Bowl games are technically neutral-site affairs, but it sure won't feel that way for the Huskers.

Nebraska will be on the wrong end of a distinct home-field advantage when it takes on Tennessee in the Music City Bowl, played Dec. 30 in Nashville.

The Volunteers will be playing in front of their home-state fans, Nashville just a couple hours' drive from campus in Knoxville.

This is the Huskers' second straight bowl trip in as many seasons under Mike Riley. Despite a 5-7 regular-season finish last year, Nebraska beat UCLA in the Foster Farms Bowl to finish Riley's first season in Lincoln on a positive note. This season, the Huskers finished the regular season at 9-3, losing three of their last five games to Wisconsin, Ohio State and Iowa.

Tennessee finished the season at 8-4, losing games throughout the season to Texas A&M, Alabama, South Carolina and Vanderbilt. Only one of those teams finished the season ranked — the No. 1 Crimson Tide — but the Volunteers stayed in the rankings, ending the year at No. 21.

This will be the fourth meeting between these two programs, the previous three all coming in bowl games. Nebraska beat Tennessee in the Orange Bowl to close out the 1997 national-championship season and won in the Fiesta Bowl to finish off the 1999 campaign.

Hoosiers get tough assignment with Utah in Foster Farms Bowl

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USA TODAY

Hoosiers get tough assignment with Utah in Foster Farms Bowl

Fresh off the resignation of its head coach, Indiana will have a mighty tough task in its bowl trip.

The Hoosiers will go up against the Utah Utes in the Foster Farms Bowl, a 6-6 squad from the Big Ten battling a top-25 team from the Pac-12. The game, played at the home of the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara, Calif., will kick at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 28.

Kevin Wilson resigned last week, and Indiana promoted defensive coordinator Tom Allen to the permanent head-coaching position. Allen’s defense made quite the transformation in his first year in Bloomington, changing from the conference’s worst unit to one that can actually cause problems for opposing offenses.

But Utah is no small challenge, one of the best teams in the Pac-12. The Utes finished their regular season 8-4 with three losses in their last four games. Utah fell to both participants in last week’s Pac-12 Championship Game, Washington and Colorado, but own a win over top-10 USC.

Still, any bowl appearance is a positive for Indiana, which will make back-to-back bowl trips for the first time in 25 years. Last year’s appearance in the Pinstripe Bowl was the program’s first postseason game since 2007 and just its second since 1993.

The initial reason given for Wilson’s departure amid the success was “philosophical differences” between him and athletics director Fred Glass. Though reporting over the weekend revealed that Glass ordered multiple investigations into the football program after complaints of student-athlete mistreatment.

Regardless, the Hoosiers will play this postseason, attempting to start the Allen Era off right.