Bears HOF linebacker Mike Singletary to be next featured guest on Inside Look

Bears HOF linebacker Mike Singletary to be next featured guest on Inside Look

CHICAGO BEARS HALL OF FAME LINEBACKER MIKE SINGLETARY TO BE THE NEXT FEATURED GUEST ON
COMCAST SPORTSNETS MONTHLY INTERVIEW SERIES, INSIDE LOOK

Inside Look presented by Cadillac, hosted by Comcast SportsNets Chris Boden, featuring Mike Singletary
to debut Friday, November 16 at 9:30 PM

CSNChicago.com to provide additional web-exclusive coverage of Inside Look, including extended video clips

Chicago, IL (November 14, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac.

Debuting Friday, November 16 at 9:30 PM, Comcast SportsNets Chris Boden hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Bears Hall of Fame linebacker & two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year MIKE SINGLETARY. Singletary, currently a linebackers coach of the Minnesota Vikings, discusses everything from his thoughts on why the 85 Bears failed to repeat as Super Bowl champions, his menacing on-field stare, his volatile rookie year relationship with defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan, his experience as an NFL head coach and much more.

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNets website, CSNChicago.com, for additional interview content never before seen on TV. Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet. Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with Mike Singletary on the following datestimes: Tue, Nov. 20 at 9:30pm - Thu, Nov. 22 at 9pm - Mon, Nov. 26 at 2pm - Sun, Dec. 2 at 8:30pm - Sun, Dec. 9 at 3:30pm - Tue, Dec. 11 at 7pm & Sun, Dec. 30 at 4:30pm.

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with Mike Singletary presented by Cadillac premiering Friday, November 16 on Comcast SportsNet:

SINGLETARY on the 85 Bears failing to repeat as Super Bowl champions:

I wouldnt say that were the greatest team of all time, simply because we didnt have the wherewithal to bring it together againand get focused again. We were the immature brats that won the Super Bowl and just did not have sense enough to realize that there were traps set all around uspulling us apartand having us look at each other and become jealous here and envious thereand the thing that we had that was so special was taken away, and no one really took it. We gave it away. And its not just the players, its Coach Ditka, its Buddy (Ryan), its all of us.

SINGLETARY on his volatile rookie season relationship with defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan:

I hated him. I could not stand him. I mean, he made me sit next to him in a meeting, I turned like this (shifting himself in chair) because I just couldnt...I couldnt even look at him.

SINGLETARY on his menacing on-field stare before the snap of the ball:

People ask me were you trying to intimidate the other team? No, not at all. The reason my eyes got big was simply because I was trying to see the whole field. Its as simple as that.

SINGLETARY on his experience as head coach of the 49ers, including his infamous post-game meltdown involving tight end Vernon Davis:

Im not a politically correct guy...Im not. I believe that if decisions have to be made, and theyre on my table to make, I got to make decisions. Did I go about it the right way? Did I do it the right way? I would say that my emotions at that time were a bit immaturebutI think everything that happened in that experience was for (Davis)and its what he needed. If I had to do it over again, I would do it different.

White Sox rookie Tim Anderson draws first walk of career

White Sox rookie Tim Anderson draws first walk of career

He has been on base routinely since his promotion, but until Thursday afternoon Tim Anderson hadn’t drawn a base on balls.

So when he finally did, in the 86th plate appearance of his career, the White Sox rookie’s teammates had fun with the occasion.

Anderson did, too. He reached base four times in five trips on Thursday as the White Sox clinched their third consecutive series win with a 6-5 victory over the Minnesota Twins at U.S. Cellular Field.

"(Todd) Frazier was like 'We got the bat, we got the pitcher, we got the umpire, we got everything,'" Anderson said of the reaction in the dugout. "It was pretty funny."

It’s hard to find fault in anything Anderson has done since the White Sox promoted him from Triple-A Charlotte earlier this month. Thursday marked the 10th multi-hit game in 19 career contests for Anderson, who was rated the No. 1 prospect in the system headed into the season by BaseballAmerica.com. He has impacted the team with his speed, his defense has been sound and he carried a .293 batting average into Thursday’s game. He also has provided more pop than expected as 10 of his first 24 hits went for extra bases.

But the fact that Anderson — who always has been an aggressive hitter — hadn’t yet walked begun to garner him attention. People tend to notice when a player’s batting average and on-base percentage are exactly the same, especially after 80-plus at-bats.

Anderson took it all in stride and earlier in the week promised his first walk was coming.

Two days later, he delivered and sauntered down to first base after he walked on five pitches against Twins starter Tommy Milone in the fourth inning. After he got to the base, Anderson nodded his head and double-pumped both fists at J.B. Shuck, who was standing on second.

"I was pretty pumped about," Anderson said. "A very exciting moment for me. It was kind of like when I got my first hit. It was fun."

He nearly matched the moment during an eighth-inning at-bat. Only two trips later, Anderson worked a full count against Fernando Abad before he took a 3-2 curveball for a called-third strike.

"I thought it was up a little bit," Anderson said with a smile before laughing. "I thought it was for sure going to be another walk. He kind of let me down.

"(The calls) will come as I get my time. Give me a little more respect."

Blackhawks have options, for the right price

Blackhawks have options, for the right price

Those tremors you felt Wednesday was the hockey world shaking things up.

They were the most exciting 30 minutes of offseason we’ve seen in some time, with the Montreal Canadiens sending P.K. Subban to Nashville for Shea Weber and Edmonton trading Taylor Hall to New Jersey for Adam Larsson. Oh, and coveted potential unrestricted free agent Steven Stamkos re-signed with the Tampa Bay Lightning, sending teams like Toronto, Detroit and Buffalo to their Plan Bs.

For the Blackhawks, they weren’t players for any of the top-tier guys. But with the free-agent “frenzy” about to begin on Friday, the Blackhawks, who have a little shopping to do, can’t get caught in the ripple effect.

Most of the top UFAs are already off the board, from Stamkos to Keith Yandle to Alex Goligoski. Prices could go up on those remaining, and that could include some guys the Blackhawks were targeting.

As general manager Stan Bowman said last Saturday following the NHL Draft, the Blackhawks no longer have a salary-cap problem. Generalfanager.com shows the Blackhawks have a little more than $5 million in cap space. That’s after the Blackhawks made two cap friendly re-signings with forward Brandon Mashinter and defenseman Michal Rozsival. According to Pierre LeBrun, Mashinter and Rozsival will earn $575,00 and $600,000, respectively, this season.

So the Blackhawks enter the weekend with some spending cash, and they may be spending some of it immediately on a familiar guy. Andy Strickland reported on Thursday that Brian Campbell, who was part of the 2010 Stanley Cup team, could return on a one-year deal. Nothing would be official until Friday, when free agency begins.

If Campbell does return it probably won’t be for much cash. But Campbell knows the Blackhawks are still built to win and he won’t be hurting for money. It could be another sensible move like Brad Richards from the summer of 2014. Richards, just bought out by the New York Rangers after the team’s trip to the Stanley Cup final, just wanted to get back to the final. He signed a one-year deal worth $2 million here. While Richards was up and down in the regular season he was great in the playoffs, capping the Blackhawks’ Cup run with that beautiful pass to Patrick Kane in Game 6. The Blackhawks aren’t what they were in 2014 but they’re not in bad shape, either. A good, affordable tweak or two could have them thinking about another lengthy postseason run.

Keep something else in mind: just about every July the Blackhawks pick up someone we didn’t anticipate. Richards was a good example of that, too.

The Blackhawks have a little cash to spend but they also have future considerations; please see Artemi Panarin, who the Blackhawks can start negotiating with on Friday. It’s not just about what they spend this season, it’s about what they save for that potential deal that would start next season.

The options are out there to improve this team but the Blackhawks have to be prudent. They can’t afford not to be.

White Sox outlast Twins to move back above .500 mark

White Sox outlast Twins to move back above .500 mark

It hasn’t been easy for the White Sox over the last seven weeks so why should Thursday afternoon be any different?

A day after they nearly squandered an eight-run advantage in the ninth, the White Sox beat the Minnesota Twins 6-5 in front of 26,158 at U.S. Cellular Field despite giving away two more leads. J.B. Shuck’s two-out RBI single in the eighth inning paved the way for the team to earn it’s third straight series victory. David Robertson converted his 21st save in 23 tries for the White Sox, who moved back above .500 for the first time since June 10.

Shuck already had two hits in three at-bats when he was gifted an eighth-inning plate appearance courtesy of a pair of two-out walks by Fernando Abad. Abad walked Avisail Garcia and Jason Coats to bring up Shuck, who singled to left to produce the winning run. Shuck tied a career-high with three hits.

Carlos Rodon twice struggled with the lead, surrendering it once.

Ahead 2-0 in the fourth, Rodon gave up back-to-back homers to Robbie Grossman and Brian Dozier with two outs. Before that, Rodon retired the first 11 batters he faced, including five strikeouts.

The White Sox regained a three-run advantage in the fourth inning and Rodon responded with a perfect fifth. But he struggled in the sixth and allowed Minnesota to creep back within a run. Rodon gave up a double and a RBI single before he walked Grossman with one out and Dozier followed with an RBI single. Matt Albers stranded a pair to keep the White Sox ahead 5-4.

Rodon exited after allowing four earned runs and five hits in 5 2/3 innings. He walked one and struck out six.

The White Sox offense figured out how to attack Tommy Milone and forced him out of the game in the fourth inning.

Todd Frazier got things rolling with a solo homer in the second inning — the 14th consecutive solo homer hit by the White Sox — to make it a 1-0 game. The team is one shy of tying a franchise record with 15 straight solo home runs, which was set from Sept. 2-25, 1965.

Jose Abreu singled in a run in the third to put the White Sox up two.

The White Sox regained the lead for Rodon in the fourth after Minnesota tied it in the top half. Avisail Garcia singled in Brett Lawrie, who started the inning with a double.

Garcia stole second base and he scored on an RBI single by Matt Davidson. It was the first big league RBI for Davidson since Sept. 27, 2013 with Arizona. Davidson later left the game with a fracture in his right foot.

After Shuck doubled and Tim Anderson walked to load the bases — his first career free pass in 86 plate appearances — Milone hit Adam Eaton to force in a run and make it 5-2. But Neil Ramirez took over and got Abreu to bounce into an inning-ending double play.

With Anderson, who reached base four times, on second and one out in the seventh, Abreu struck out and Frazier flew out.