Bears-Seahawks preview: Protect the protectors

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Bears-Seahawks preview: Protect the protectors

Long-ago Bears defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan always said that he learned his most basic tenet while the New York Jets defensive line coach and he saw the single-mindedness with which head coach Weeb Ewbank protecting quarterback Joe Namath. Ryan said he concluded that if taking care of the quarterback was that important, then getting to the quarterback should be the prime directive for his group, and when he became a coordinator in Chicago, it remained his guiding principle.

Jay Cutler, whether for reasons of strategy or simple self-preservation, is of like mind.

First and foremost, youve got to protect the quarterback, Cutler said. Its hard throwing out of a phone booth all the time. It makes life difficult when youre getting hit so you should be protected. If its better to have a few more guys in helping out, then thats what weve got to do.

So, how to do it

Saying it and doing it are different matters entirely. And, besides the fact that Seattle ranks No. 3 defensively in scoring (16.8 points per game; the Bears are No. 2 at 15.9 and San Francisco still No. 1), heres the first problem:

A weakness in the Bears offense an offensive line still with moving parts after injuries and demotions is directly opposite core strength of the Seattle Seahawks defense.

The Seahawks made defensive end Bruce Irvin the 15th overall pick of this years draft. He has seven sacks (nine, according to ProFootballFocus.com), five QB hits and 14 hurries despite playing almost exclusively in nickel situations and less than half (280) of Seattle opponents 667 snaps.

Chris Clemons has eight sacks and 17 hits. Clemons is 6-foot-3, 254 pounds, or just about the same size as San Franciscos Aldon Smith, who ran over and through the Bears for 5.5 sacks.

Seattle starts Clemons along with three massives: end Red Bryant (6-4, 323), who returned an interception of a Caleb Hanie pass last year for a touchdown; and tackles Alan Branch (6-6, 325) and Brandon Mebane (6-1, 311).

Theyve got some size about them, said offensive coordinator Mike Tice. And 91 Clemons is a prolific pass rusher.

Finding a weakness

The Bears stated goal every game is to render an opponent one-dimensional by taking away the run game. The Seahawks believe the same but have inexplicably struggled stopping the run, however, going from No. 4 in the NFL in yards per carry allowed to No. 26 this season.

But Seattle ranks seventh in sacks per pass play and the Bears are an alarming 32nd in sacks allowed per play. And the Seahawks allow opposing quarterbacks a pedestrian 75.4 passer rating per game. Only the Bears (65.1) and Arizona Cardinals (74.3) are tougher.

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Bears DL Akiem Hicks making the most of a chance the Saints never gave him

Bears DL Akiem Hicks making the most of a chance the Saints never gave him

Living well is indeed the best revenge, and sometimes nothing feels sweeter than proving doubters wrong. Akiem Hicks is savoring that exact feeling.

When the New Orleans Saints made Hicks their third-round pick in the 2013 draft, they typecast their big (6-5, 318 pounds) young defensive lineman as a one-trick pony.

“There were people in New Orleans that said, ‘You can’t rush the passer,’” Hicks recalled after the Bears’ win Sunday over the San Francisco 49ers. “They told me from my rookie year, ‘You’re going to be a run-stopper.’”

This despite Hicks collecting 6.5 sacks and 3 pass breakups as a senior at Regina in Canada. The Saints forced Hicks into the slot they’d decided he fit – nose tackle – then eventually grew disenchanted with him and traded him to New England last year – where he collect 3 sacks in spot duty.

Interestingly, Bears GM Ryan Pace was part of the Saints’ personnel operation. Whether Pace agreed with coaches’ handling of Hicks then isn’t known, but when Pace had the chance to bring Hicks to Chicago for a role different than the one the Saints forced Hicks into, Pace made it happen.

Pace likely saw those New England sacks as a foreshadowing or a sign that the New Orleans staff had miscast Hicks. The Bears defensive end now is under consideration for NFC defensive player of the week after his 10-tackle performance against San Francisco. Signing with the Bears last March 13 as a free agent was the career break Hicks has craved. For him it was a career lifeline.

“They have given me the ability to go rush the passer,” Hicks said. “So I love this organization – [GM] Ryan Pace, coach Fox, Vic [Fangio, defensive coordinator] – for just giving a guy the capability to put it out there and do what you feel like you can do.”

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Hicks has been showing what he can do, to quarterbacks. For him the best part of win over the 49ers was the two third-quarter sacks of 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Those sacks gave the massive lineman, who the Saints said couldn’t rush the passer, 6 sacks for the season – more than any member of the Saints defense this season. It has been a classic instance of putting a player in position to maximize his skills, not jam someone into a bad fit.

“Akiem has been in a couple of different types of packages before with New Orleans and New England,” said coach John Fox. The Patriots switched from a long-time 3-4 scheme to a 4-3 but “we’re more of a New England-type style. But we’re playing him more at end; he played mostly a nose tackle [in New Orleans]. He’s fit really well for us as far as his physical stature.

"But he does have pass rush ability. It shows a little about his athleticism. So he’s got a combination of both.”

That “combination” has been allowed to flourish at a new level, and the Bears’ plan for Hicks was the foundation of why he wanted to sign in Chicago as a free agent. The Bears do not play their defensive linemen in a clear one-gap, get-upfield-fast scheme tailored to speed players. Nor do they play a classic two-gap, linemen-control-blockers scheme typically built on three massive space-eaters on the defensive line.

They play what one player has called a “gap and a half” system, which requires being stout as well as nimble.

One Hicks rush on Kaepernick featured a deft spin move out of a block, not the norm for 336-pound linemen. He got one sack with a quick slide out of a double-team.

“I’m not freelancing,” Hicks said. “But I’m rushing ‘fast.’ There’s a portion of the defense where you have the [run] responsibility and don’t have the freedom or liberty [to rush]. It’s a great system for me and I love what they’ve let me do.”