Bobby Petrino offers details of his affair

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Bobby Petrino offers details of his affair

From Comcast SportsNetFAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) -- Bobby Petrino's relationship with his mistress dated back more than a year, with the former Arkansas coach sending her candy, calling her a "close friend" and suggesting the affair that cost him his job started with a kiss over lunch last fall, according to documents released Thursday.Those details were in handwritten notes kept by athletic director Jeff Long during his investigation of Petrino, who was fired last week. Long's notes, along with those of assistant athletic director Jon Fagg, were released as part of a Freedom of Information Act request made by the Associated Press. The two interviewed Petrino, his mistress and others during the investigation that led to the coach's dismissal on April 10 -- nine days after the motorcycle crash that exposed their relationship.The notes suggest the 51-year-old Petrino and 25-year-old Jessica Dorrell were intimate for approximately five months, from September or October until this past February. According to the notes, however, the university discovered 326 phone calls and 7,228 text messages between the two that date back further, to April 2011. And they show Petrino and Dorrell claimed to have ended the intimate part of their relationship once it became clear she wanted to apply for a job under Petrino -- one he wanted her to "earn." She was hired March 28 and has since resigned.Long was clearly skeptical that the affair was truly over, asking in his notes: "If the relationship was over, why get on (the) bike?""Why would she say she expected the relationship to continue if the motorcrash didn't occur," Long also wrote down as one of his questions for the coach. No answer was listed for either in the notes.In the end, Long was unable to overlook Petrino's repeated failures to disclose details of his affair, noting the following times in his notes:. "You knew when you hired her.". "You knew on Sunday (the day of the crash).". "You knew when I visited you in (the) hospital (the day following the accident)."Long also made a point in his notes to remind Petrino that he hid the affair and a 20,000 Christmas gift before Dorrell was hired. Dorrell told Long she hid the money under her mattress, then deposited it shortly before buying a new car the week she began her job.According to Long, Petrino said he and Dorrell became friends while she held her former job as a fundraiser for the Razorback Foundation. They began going to lunch together, and Petrino told his boss that his affair with Dorrell began with a kiss last fall.At one point last October, Petrino and Dorrell were sitting in a car, eating lunch and talking and "she said are you going to kiss me," according to Long's notes of his April 10 conversation with Petrino. He then wrote: "Kissed on lunch outing."It's unclear when the relationship turned sexual. Dorrell said the two had been intimate four to six times since around September, and the "last encounter" was around signing day on Feb. 1, when Petrino showed up via car service at a Little Rock event rather than arriving by plane. Fagg's notes indicate the two decided they should be only friends sometime in early February. Petrino told Long that Dorrell was interested in the job, that "she approached him. Thought she would be good. Understood they would definitely have to stop."Petrino was fired for failing to disclose his relationship with Dorrell, a former Arkansas volleyball player whom he hired last month without disclosing his conflict of interest or the fact he had once given her the 20,000. The payment, Long wrote, could make the school "vulnerable to sexual harassment" lawsuit.Petrino, Long wrote, "never thought the gift was a problem or the relationship." Long put two big question marks next to that entry.Dorrell referred to "5-6 gifts" during her interview with Long, according to the notes, and Long said the money was used for the car, wedding expenses and a vacation. There are references to candy gifts -- Hot Tamales, specifically, with Dorrell saying she "got it once before things started" and Long also talked with Josh Morgan, an athletic department employee who has been described as Dorrell's fiance "at one point.""Football gave her a bonus to get a car," Morgan told Long, according to the notes. The purchase of the black Acura apparently came three days after she was hired. Dorrell quit her job Tuesday and received 14,000 in what the school described only as a settlement payment.Long wrote a detailed list of contract violations Petrino had committed before meeting with the former coach to discuss them. He included in his notes that he was still looking for Petrino to remain the Arkansas coach, despite those violations, and asked Petrino to "help me understand why these are not violations of your contract."However, Petrino's answers didn't provide Long with the ammunition he was looking for to keep the highly successful coach. Instead, Petrino confirmed his relationship with Dorrell had continued, saying they went on the fateful April 1 motorcycle outing because they "had always said they would go for a ride."

Only the Cubs: Tommy La Stella finally returns from exile

Only the Cubs: Tommy La Stella finally returns from exile

The main takeaway from a 15-minute press conference where Tommy La Stella talked a lot and said very little: Only the Cubs.

Even La Stella realizes he’s fortunate to be working for Joe Maddon, perhaps the most liberal manager in an extremely conservative industry, and Theo Epstein’s front office, which takes a holistic view of player development and built out an entire wing for mental skills. 

There aren’t many other markets where one of the last guys on the roster could dominate multiple news cycles, but the appetite for information on the best team in baseball appears to be endless, and this story is so bizarre, even by Cubbie standards. 

La Stella addressed his teammates inside the Wrigley Field clubhouse for about 10 minutes before starting at second base and batting seventh in Wednesday night’s lineup against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

But La Stella – the second act in a trilogy of media sessions in the underground interview room, after Maddon and before Epstein – didn’t offer any real insight into why he refused to report to Triple-A Iowa in late July, moved home to New Jersey, told ESPN he might retire if he couldn’t play for the big-league Cubs and finally ended his three-week holdout in the middle of August.

“That’s pretty much between me and them – and me and Theo,” La Stella said. “I understand that there’s going to be people out there who kind of draw conclusions and stuff. And that’s fine. I’m not necessarily out here to make anybody see anything or explain anything. 

“As long as people understand that there are things out there that are kind of personal to me – and I’ve shared those with the guys. It’s not necessarily going to be just like a cut-and-dry, black-and-white answer where everybody goes: ‘Oh, yeah, I get it now.’ That answer doesn’t really exist.”

La Stella confirmed the answer didn't involve a health issue or crisis in his family. This reunion became inevitable the longer the Cubs played this game, taking a softer approach, knowing his left-handed swing could help win a playoff game and not immediately cutting him.

“That was obviously a very real possibility that I was fully prepared for,” La Stella said. “I was at a point in my life, just personally and professionally, (where) that wasn’t something that I was in fear of. I was OK with it.

“The way Theo approached it…I was very lucky because he treated me like a person and not an employee.”

La Stella, 27, isn’t sure if he wants to remain a Cubs employee beyond this season: “I don’t know, to be honest with you. I don’t want to say something, because I don’t have an answer.”

And when asked if he missed the game during his retreat, La Stella said: “I missed the guys. The game, to me, that’s kind of just the avenue for the other type of enjoyment that I get through those guys and the stuff that we get to do together.”

How much of your decision to step away came out of pure frustration after being sent down to the minors with a .295 average?

“None of it,” La Stella said. “I know that sounds absurd to say. (But) that had absolutely nothing to do with that. I made that very clear to Theo. I told him when it happened: I totally understood the move. He’s doing what he believes is in the best interest of the team. I’m all for that.”

It got to the point where an exasperated columnist asked: Do you understand how strange this is for us to comprehend, how there’s nothing to grasp here?

“I hear ya,” La Stella said. “It’s certainly not a typical situation.”

Epstein – who’s in his 25th season in Major League Baseball, which should be converted into dog years after all the time he’s spent with the Cubs and Boston Red Sox – had never seen anything like it before.

“There are appropriate times for punishment,” Epstein said, “and standing up for the organization if we think an individual is acting in a malevolent way and putting himself before the organization and trying to do damage to the team concept.

“I can just tell you that after talking to him, we didn’t feel that way. We felt it was more misguided and not malevolent, so we wanted to work with him to get him back to this point.” 

La Stella’s personal journey included temporarily quitting baseball in high school, transferring from St. John’s University to Coastal Carolina University and deserting the Atlanta Braves, which he explained as a “completely different” situation: “Somebody close to me was sick in the hospital.”

“One of the things I like about Tommy the most is that he is his own man,” Maddon said. Another thing: “The guy can wake up in the middle of the night and hit a line drive on a 1-2 count.” 

La Stella clearly made a connection with Maddon, forged alliances in the clubhouse with respected professionals like Jake Arrieta and Jason Heyward and should still have that unique hand-eye coordination and contact skills. As for the reaction from the fans…

“It’s tough for me to say, because I haven’t read anything,” La Stella said. “I haven’t looked at anything – good or bad – so I don’t really necessarily know what the perception of all of it is. I’m sure negatively there’s going to be some people who don’t understand, or don’t agree. And that’s fine. 

“A couple difficult personal experiences for me between now and the end of the year isn’t going to outweigh all the incredible stuff I’ve gotten to see here at Wrigley. It’s a pretty sacred place. It’s going to take more than a couple difficult moments for me personally to change any feeling on that.”

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La Stella did admit that he wondered how he would be received by teammates – and if they would question his commitment to the game.

“I’d be lying if I said that wasn’t something that eventually enters your mind,” La Stella said. “But the thing that outweighed that for me was I couldn’t not do what I felt was right for me, just because of how it might be perceived by other people.

“That group of guys in there is an unbelievably special group. And if there was one team that would welcome something like this back, it’s those guys. I’m very lucky.”

Only the Cubs.

Preview: Quintana takes the hill as White Sox face Twins on CSN

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Preview: Quintana takes the hill as White Sox face Twins on CSN

The White Sox take on the Minnesota Twins on Thursday, and you can catch all the action on CSN. Coverage begins at 7:00 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Thursday’s starting pitching matchup: Jose Quintana vs. Ervin Santana

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.  

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— Channel finder: Make sure you know where to watch.

— Latest on the White Sox: All of the most recent news and notes.

— See what fans are talking about before, during and after the game with White Sox Pulse.

Meaningless preseason Game 4 can tilt Bears, other roster decisions

Meaningless preseason Game 4 can tilt Bears, other roster decisions

The Bears will conclude their preseason with the Cleveland Browns for the 13th straight season, part of the NFL’s preference for teams playing closer to home in final preseason games such as Buffalo at Detroit, Indianapolis at Cincinnati, Houston at Dallas and Jacksonville at Atlanta, among others.

Correlations between Bears results in Game 4 and what the regular season holds aren’t worth the effort. But several other aspects of Bears-Browns will be:

Who’s up, who’s down

Who plays and who doesn’t have decidedly different meanings for Game 3 vs. Game 4. Healthy scratches from Game 3 typically are at risk in the first round of cuts; five of those DNP’s were among the initial cuts.

The reverse is commonly the case in Game 4. Players sitting out are generally those already included in the roster plans, with playing time going to backups competing for a late roster spot or to show skills sufficient for scouts from other teams to look for them on the waiver wire after the weekend’s final trims. Virtually all of the Bears players sitting out Game 4 last year, won by the Bears 24-0, were ticketed for the initial 53-man roster.

The Bears face some tight decisions at a number of positions, not the least of which is at wide receiver, where only Alshon Jeffery and Kevin White are assured roster spots. Marc Mariani has played his way into quarterback Jay Cutler’s comfort zone and is in a contest with oft-injured Eddie Royal for the No. 3/slot receiver job. Both could secure spots on the “53” as could Josh Bellamy, who was among the Bears’ top special-teams tacklers.

[MORE: CB K'Waun Williams reportedly fails physical with Bears]

Royal is guaranteed $4.5 million for 2016 but Bears Chairman George McCaskey has been consistent in stating that money will not be the sole reason for personnel decisions.

Rookie Daniel Braverman has been a non-factor in games and has not flashed on special teams. Cameron Meredith has a TD catch but has not stepped out on special teams, while returner Deonte Thompson has not been able to overcome injuries enough to make a clear roster statement yet.

“It's so tough,” Royal said. “We've got a lot of guys who can play. This is one of the most talented groups I've ever been around, just from top to bottom. These guys can play, you can see it out there with these practices and the few preseason games that we've had, the guys are out there making plays, so it's going to be some tough decisions to make because everybody in our room can play.”

A chance for an impression

A small handful of players may see the field simply because the Bears haven’t had many chances to see them this training camp and preseason. And they may just need some work.

Linebackers Lamarr Houston and Willie Young, both coming off leg injuries that ended their 2014 seasons, both started and played nearly two-dozen snaps against the Browns. Hroniss Grasu, a roster lock as a third-round pick, nevertheless started at center and played every snap. Charles Leno Jr., after starting in a trial at right tackle the two previous games, was tried at left tackle and showed enough to hold onto the swing-tackle job while Jordan Mills’ Bears tenure was ended.

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This year linebacker Nick Kwiatkoski was a fourth-round Bears pick in this year’s draft but went down with a hamstring injury early in camp and hasn’t seen the field at all through preseason.

“Truth be told, we didn’t see a whole lot of him,” said coach John Fox. “Obviously, we evaluated him on his college tape. Saw him in some of the offseason stuff. He got hurt very early on in camp. It was a legit injury to his hamstring. He’s been in meetings. He’s been with us. But as far as our true evaluation, it’s a little bit of a leap of faith. We’ll kind of march down that road as we move forward.”

How special are ‘teams?

Non-starters typically need to demonstrate a willingness and ability to play special teams. Linebackers Jonathan Anderson and John Timu were undrafted longshots going into camp but played double-digit snaps on special teams, contributed tackles, and by season’s end had each started three games.

The Bears have been anemic on punt returns (1.9 ypr.) and the Bears have spread the job around looking for solutions.

And pay attention to Browns special-team’ers. The Bears once were impressed by the special-teams devastation wrought by Browns fullback Tyler Clutts in the 2011 Game 4 against them. The Browns waived Clutts, the Bears signed him to a three-year deal and Clutts played through the 2015 season, finishing last year with the Dallas Cowboys.