Boehm is big man at New Trier

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Boehm is big man at New Trier

Connor Boehm, the 6-foot-7, 235-pound mover and shaker on New Trier's basketball team, played baseball until his freshman year. Then he realized that he had fun on a basketball court, that basketball was his future, that he wanted to mix basketball and academics in college.

"I didn't like baseball," Boehm said. "If you strike out, you don't get another at-bat for two or three innings. In basketball, if you miss a shot, you might get another one the next time down the floor. It was frustrating in baseball. Two strikeouts and your day is done. In basketball, there are a lot of other things you can do to redeem yourself."

New Trier coach Scott Fricke has the same philosophy as he prepares his team for the Proviso West Holiday Tournament. The Trevians are 10-1 after beating Fenwick 62-57 on Tuesday in the opening round. Boehm scored 17 points while point guard David Bragiel had 18 and Steven Cook 15.

"We take the Proviso West tournament as an early state tournament," Fricke said. "It is unforgiving. You make or miss one shot and it is the difference between winning one game or three games. You play a good team in every game. It is time to gauge ourselves at this point.

"Where are we at? Where do we need to get to in order to play well in the real state tournament? Proviso West is a state tournament in December. But if you lose, the season isn't over. Now you play against great players and great size. Can we match up to a great team?"

Boehm is looking to answer those questions, too. His role has changed every year at New Trier. As a sophomore on a 22-4 team, he was a grinder who scrapped for offensive rebounds and dived for loose balls on the floor. Last year, on a 15-11 team, he was asked to score a lot and averaged 20 points per game. This year? Whether he likes it or not, this is his team.

"He is banging down low and we also want him to get assists, to kick the ball back to the guards," Fricke said. "It doesn't bother him that his scoring average has dipped a bit (17 ppg). All he cares about is winning. He also has developed his perimeter game. He averages one three-pointer a game. We have plays for him to shoot from the outside."

Recruiting analysts Roy and Harv Schmidt of Illinois Prep Bulls-Eye like what they see in Boehm and the New Trier team.

"Connor Boehm personifies the blue-collar type of player who brings his lunch bucket to work every day and simply does his job," Harv Schmidt said. "He has a strong frame and good hands, both of which he utilizes well around the basket. As a result, he is a consistent scorer with his back to the basket and is strong on the glass.

"New Trier is yet another team that knows how to utilize its strengths and exploit its opponent's weaknesses. They have a little bit of everything -- strong post play with Connor Boehm, an athletic open-court player in Austin Angel and others who are good shooters from the perimeter and play hard-nosed defense. New Trier is right there with Warren as the premier team in Chicago's north suburbs."

The Trevians' only loss was to Warren 64-46 on Dec. 3. "Warren's size was too much for us. They killed us on the boards," Fricke said. Boehm was limited to 10 points and five rebounds. But, as is the case with the Proviso West tournament, one loss in December isn't a season-ender. "But it means there are things we can improve on," Boehm said.

"We can really be dangerous," Boehm said. "We have a combination of good guards and good shooters and I have to do what I need to do down low. We aren't the biggest team but I'm the biggest player on the team so the responsibility falls to me to do the dirty work, to hit the offensive boards and get defensive rebounds."

Coming off last season, he knew he had to put on weight and get a lot stronger if he was going to dominate under the boards or hold his own against more athletic opponents. It is his senior year and he desperately wants to win the sectional championship, New Trier's first since 2005.

Boehm is surrounded by 6-foot-4 senior Austin Angel (14 ppg), 5-foot-10 senior point guard David Bragiel (five points per game, four assists), 6-foot-4 junior Steven Cook (10
points per game) and 5-foot-10 junior Reid Berman (six points per game). The bench is headed by 5-foot-10 sophomore Jordan Thomas and 6-foot-8 junior Aaron Angel, Austin's brother.

Austin Angel missed most of last season after undergoing emergency surgery for a ruptured appendix after the third game. He came back for the state tournament but never got into playing shape. Now he is back and healthy. He scored 24 points against Niles West.

Bragiel has good bloodlines. His grandfather, Jim Bragiel, played at Morton and Northwestern. "He doesn't get mentioned very much. But he has the heart of a champion. We aren't the same team when he isn't on the floor. He holds our team together. We can't play without him," Fricke said.

Fricke, a 1989 graduate of Riverside-Brookfield, is in his fourth year as head coach at New Trier. He coached at Sycamore and Fenwick before landing at the Winnetka school, becoming Mel Sheets' freshman coach in 1995. It was Sheets' last year and Fricke joined new coach Rick Malnati's staff. When Malnati left, he was selected over a field that included some high-profile state championship coaches.

"I knew the New Trier system. I learned from Sheets and Malnati," he said. "It was a smooth transition. When Rick left, the program was in good shape. I'm continuing to do a lot of the same things. But you can't run the same system year after year."

Fricke changed the offense, preferring a Princeton-style approach to make better use of his players' talent. "We will run the system that gives our kids the best chance to succeed. This year, we have a lot of good guards so I changed the offense to four outside and one inside," he said.

He believes his current squad compares favorably to Malnati's 25-8 team that finished fourth in the 2002 state tournament and the 22-4 team of two years ago that featured Alex Rossi and Fred Helbring.

"We have a lot of poise. Nothing rattles them," Fricke said. "We have enough firepower to play different styles, fast-paced or slow down. We can execute in half-court or take advantage of Boehm's size and our outside shooting. We are well-rounded an versatile."

To prepare for this season, Boehm went into the weight room and added 20 pounds of muscle. He knew he couldn't be the fastest or most agile player on the floor but he could be the strongest. "There were times last year where an extra push would have been helpful," he said.

At the same time, he put his academic portfolio in order. Education is very important to him. One brother is at Bucknell, another at Harvard. He chose Dartmouth over Cal-Poly, Holy Cross and Lafayette.

"Dartmouth is the right fit for me. It has good academics and I will have a chance to get playing time as a freshman." Boehm said. "If I was 6-10 and could jump out of the gym, the NBA would be my ultimate goal. But I'm 6-foot-7 and can't jump out of the gym. Getting a good education is important to me."

So is closing his high school career on a high note, preferably a trip to Peoria in March with his teammates. To play, not to watch.

"The program has been successful in the past few years but we didn't go far in the playoff," Boehm said. "It is important to bring the team Downstate and farther. We have a lot of guards who can play and you need good guard play in the state tournament. They ignite everything. With good guard play comes good post play.

"I've been with these guys for two or three years. We carpool together. We have team dinners together. We all get along. I've heard the coach say: 'This is the hardest working team I've ever been around.' We have lots of guys who stay after practice to shoot. They care about the team."

Monday on CSN, CSNChicago.com: Bulls introduce Denzel Valentine

Monday on CSN, CSNChicago.com: Bulls introduce Denzel Valentine

The Bulls will introduce first round draft pick Denzel Valentine on Monday at the Advocate Center, and CSN has you covered all the way.

Tune in to CSN Chicago or catch a live stream on CSNChicago.com at 11 a.m. as GM Gar Forman and head coach Fred Hoiberg introduce Valentine, the Michigan State senior whom the Bulls selected 14th overall in last week's NBA Draft.

Valentine, last year's AP Player of the Year, became the first player in NCAA history to average at least 19 points, seven rebounds and seven assists in a single season. The shooting guard's versatility and ability to shoot from the perimeter will make him a perfect fit in Fred Hoiberg's system, and his passing will help in the wake of the Bulls dealing Derrick Rose to the Knicks.

Check out our coverage of Valentine and the rest of the Bulls draft:

Bulls 'absolutely thrilled' to land Denzel Valentine

Gar Forman shoots down Jimmy Butler trade talk

How the NBA cap spike will affect the Bulls

Bulls get 'a well-rounded player' in Paul Zipser

How the Bulls' Central Division foes fared in the 2016 NBA Draft

White Sox Road Ahead: Heating up on the South Side

White Sox Road Ahead: Heating up on the South Side

CSN's JJ Stankevitz and Siera Santos discuss the struggles of James Shields while also going over a difficult upcoming series for the White Sox in this week's Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & Northwest Indiana Honda dealers.

On the back of Chris Sale and his 13th win, the White Sox are back to .500 after taking two of three from the Toronto Blue Jays.

The South Siders have now won five of their last seven games, and won back-to-back series for the first time in nearly two months. They're now 2.5 games behind the Blue Jays for the second Wild Card spot and are playing much better baseball as they head toward the All-Star break.

Hear what JJ Stankevitz and Siera Santos had to say about their big week, as well as their upcoming three-game series against the Twins, in this week's Honda Road Ahead video above.

White Sox win consecutive series for first time since late April

White Sox win consecutive series for first time since late April

The White Sox have been adamant the baseball they’ve played the past six weeks isn’t far removed from their torrid start to the season.

Now they have something to show for it.

Courtesy of a 5-2 win over the Toronto Blue Jays on Sunday afternoon at U.S. Cellular Field, the White Sox have back-to-back series victories for the first time since they swept the Texas Rangers and Toronto two months ago. With five wins in their last seven tries, the White Sox improved to 38-38 as they head into a much-needed day off.

“It’s huge,” said outfielder J.B. Shuck, whose second homer in as many days provided an insurance run in the bottom of the eighth. “You feel kind of a weight lifted off the shoulders in the clubhouse. We’ve been grinding. Even some of our losses, we’ve been in games. We’ve come back, we’ve given ourselves a chance and one thing here or there kind of led us to losing and now it’s starting to work for us a little bit.”

A week ago the White Sox were coming off yet another demoralizing road sweep against an AL Central opponent. They had played well in two of three contests against the Cleveland Indians but came up empty. That sweep followed one at the Detroit Tigers earlier in the month and another previous one during a hellish May weekend in Kansas City.

But starting with an extra-innings win at the Boston Red Sox on Monday night, the White Sox have started to put things together more consistently than they had of late.

They capitalized on good pitching in the first two victories over the Red Sox and then the offense did the heavy lifting in an 8-6 win on Wednesday. Though they didn’t close out a sweep of Boston, the White Sox carried it over to their home series against Toronto.

“We need some of those,” said closer David Robertson, who retired the side on 10 pitches in the ninth to convert his 20th save. “When you get your butt kicked and you get swept in places, you gotta come home and win some games. We’re playing a lot better baseball. We’re pitching better. Hopefully it continues and we stay strong.”

Sunday’s victory was full of quality play in all aspects for the White Sox.

-- Chris Sale was dominant for seven of eight innings and earned his 13th victory in 15 decisions.

-- Robertson’s inning aside, Sale gave the bullpen another critical day of rest.

“It’s kind of relaxing,” reliever Zach Duke said.

-- Beginning with Adam Eaton’s major-league leading 10th outfield assist in the first inning, the defense turned in several big plays behind Sale, including double plays in the fourth and seventh.

-- The offense provided several timely hits, whether Melky Cabrera’s two-out RBI single in the third or Shuck’s solo homer to increase the lead back to three runs in the eighth.

Now the White Sox have a day to rest before they continue their homestand on Tuesday with the first of three against the Minnesota Twins.

“I like the way we're playing,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “I think offensively, we're swinging it a little bit, doing some things, and playing defense along with it. That's a good sign for us to be able to continue to do that. Pitchers are getting back to being healthy and getting after it. I like the way this is headed. I like the fire that these guys have shown and bouncing back in some tough situations.”