Bulls shootaround notes: Bulls prepare to host Thunder


Bulls shootaround notes: Bulls prepare to host Thunder

With mounting injuries to key players on a handful of teams even before the regular season has begun, many coaches are resting their players as the preseason winds down. But for Tom Thibodeau and the Chicago Bulls, improving every day with a fairly new roster means all systems go with two games left in the preseason.

Dirk Nowitzki, Kevin Love, Stephen Curry, Amare Stoudemire and rookie Austin Rivers are just a few big names who have suffered injuries this preseason, while John Wall, Ricky Rubio and Derrick Rose also will miss the beginning of the regular season. All-Stars Dwyane Wade and Dwight Howard underwent offseason surgeries to ready themselves for the start of the season, and are being brought along slowly.

In one of the most injury-riddled starts to an NBA season in recent memory, Tom Thibodeau said he sees the benefit in playing his starters with little limitations to form chemistry and good habits that will take the team deep into the season.

We want to continue to improve, Thibodeau said. Thats been the whole focus of our camp. Each day get better, just go step-by-step, build the right habits, do the right things and then the results will take care of themselves. I just want us to keep moving forward.

The Bulls host the reigning Western Conference champion Oklahoma City Thunder tonight, and coach Scott Brooks has opted to rest Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook with two games left until the regular season. And while Thibodeau will be cautious with his group, he said the benefit of playing his roster, to an extent, like he would a regular season game will help.

Youre building your foundation, youre building your habits, and youre trying to get ready to endure a long season, he said. But its important to focus in on exactly whats in front of you. You dont want to look behind, you dont want to look ahead. You want to concentrate on exactly what youre trying to get accomplished right now.

The approach, the attitude, readiness to play, knowing your opponent, all that stuff is important. So I want us to be building the right habits, and well see where we are after the game.

Thibodeau said he is happy with where his team is right now, thanks in part to a full offseason of workouts and training camp that saw six newcomers arrive in Chicago. And while increased preseason repetitions will help that acclimation process, Thibodeau understands his team will have to make adjustments moving forward

Were going to continue to add throughout the season, but you dont get it all in one day, or one week or three weeks, he said. Youre gonna continue to build and then you see how teams are defending certain things, so youll add counters in. Youll see how theyre trying to attack your defense so you may make adjustments to some of your schemes to take certain things away. So youre constantly building and trying to improve.

A healthy Hamilton brings scoring to Bulls offense

The Bulls have averaged 88.4 points in five preseason games, third lowest in the NBA, but a pleasant surprise has been the consistency of shooting guard Richard Hamilton.

The 13-year veteran missed 38 of 66 games last season with various injuries, but has logged at least at least 20 minutes and 10 points in four of the Bulls five preseason games. His 15.2 points per game lead the Bulls, and is shooting better than 51 percent from the field.

I think hes played very well in the preseason and health is critical for him and us, Thibodeau said. So hes got to continue to work on taking care of his body, which hes done. Hes put in a lot of work over the summer so were hopeful that he can endure the whole season.

Hamilton did not have time last summer to mold into a role in Chicago. With the NBA lockout spilling into late November, the 34-year-old Hamilton was thrown into the lineup while battling nagging injuries.

A groin injury forced him out of 10 of the Bulls first 15 games. He played in six games to end January, but missed the next 13 with a thigh injury. Later in March, he missed 15 more games with a shoulder injury. He returned in April and averaged 12.1 points on 45 percent shooting in 12 games to end the season.

With the injuries behind him for now, a healthy Hamilton looks to be a key piece to the Bulls new rotation.

He got hurt so early in the year and he never really got into a rhythm. The first time he got into extended games was April and so it was unfortunate for him and us, Thibodeau said. But hes a lot healthier this year, so sometimes theres not anything you can do about injuries. You deal with them as best you can. Hes healthy now and thats all that matters.

Bulls five-man mentality improves assist, turnover rate

The Bulls have an entirely new look at point guard this season, headed by Kirk Hinrich and Nate Robinson, while the team awaits the return of Derrick Rose.

Early results in the preseason werent pretty, as the Bulls compiled 45 assists and 63 turnovers through three games. But in the teams past two preseason contests, wins over Milwaukee and Minnesota, they have handed out 51 assists and turned the ball over just 30 times as a team.

Thibodeau attributes the better passing to the Bulls having what he calls a five-man mentality on offense.

Turnovers usually are, at the start of the season, theyre usually up, he said. But you want to get rid of the ones that are a result of being too much 1-on-1 or trying to make home run pass instead of simple plays. Keep the ball moving, make the right decision, make the quick decision, shoot it pass it drive it. Lets make a decision.

Those habits form through repetitions both in practice and in games, one of the reasons Thibodeau wants to keep his rotation in tact leading up to the start of the regular season.

A big thing is sharing the ball, and its a big part of the overall philosophy of the team. If a man is open you hit him. If youre being guarded by two or youre in a crowd, we want you to pass. If youre open and not guarded and its your shot, we want you to take it. Its not hard. Pretty simple, and again youre building those habits right from the start of camp.

Starting point guard Kirk Hinrich leads the team this preseason with 6.5 assists per game, followed by Nate Robinson (4.5), Richard Hamilton (2.2) and Jimmy Butler (2.0).

Remembering 'Catholics vs. Convicts:' A conversation with Notre Dame's Pat Terrell

Remembering 'Catholics vs. Convicts:' A conversation with Notre Dame's Pat Terrell

With Notre Dame and Miami playing an on-campus game for the first time in 26 years this Saturday in South Bend, CSNChicago.com talked at length with former Irish safety Pat Terrell about the most epic game in the history of the heated series: The 1988 "Catholics vs. Convicts" game. Terrell's breakup of Miami quarterback Steve Walsh's pass on a two-point conversion attempt sealed Notre Dame's win, and the Irish went on to be crowned national champions at the end of the season. Terrell's responses are below and have been edited for clarity. 

What was the atmosphere on campus like leading up to the game? Was it a different vibe given the magnitude of the game?

Pat Terrell: Oh, without a doubt. Without a doubt. The atmosphere was one created by the hype of the game, obviously you have a No. 1 team coming into town, and the fact that we truly thought at the beginning of that season we had something special. And so really, we knew we wanted to test how good we really were. We had confidence, we knew we had the players. And the atmosphere that week was crazy intense. I remember practice being like you were preparing for a playoff game or a national championship game.

There was no secret it was a big game. We were used to the media attention. But this was different. Thirty percent was fueled by the student body talking a lot of trash, which (laughs), hey, you guys need to pump the brakes a little bit. And 70 percent was just we had — we went into the game with confidence, but we wanted to see how good we were against the best. 

You mentioned the student body, and “Catholics vs. Convicts” T-shirt, were you worried Miami was going to take extra motivation from those?

Pat Terrell: No, quite frankly, that T-shirt came out — for a lot of the players, we chuckled, but it was kind of cold. We were kind of tongue-in-cheek, because we were like wow, we know the university’s not going to be too excited about this, but it just took off on a life of its own. But you can control what happens on the football field, you can’t control what happens out in the media and what have you. I’m not going to exaggerate and make up something that we were fired up about the T-shirt or anything else. It was just, for us, about a big game being a big game. Obviously the T-shirt added fuel, but to answer your question, we’re playing Miami. That’s a team with swagger. They were going into every game, every stadium facing the scrutiny of people’s interpretation of how they celebrate and how they play.

But no, we never thought, oh my gosh, they’re going to put this up on the locker room chalkboard. And Miami knew it didn’t come from the players. They’re watching film of us, we’re watching film of them. They had some respect for us, but we didn’t get worried that was going to fuel the fire. These guys hadn’t lost a (regular season game in over 30 games I believe, so they didn’t need any extra motivation to keep their streak going and maintain their No. 1. Because if I remember correctly, they had just won a National Championship the year before and they started the season off ranked (sixth). And they quickly went to No. 1 after they beat Florida State, but they were already motivated. I don’t think the shirt motivated them anymore. 

In the years since that game, what have your interactions been like with guys who played on that Miami team? How much did you talk about the game, the shirts and the history that came with it?

Pat Terrell: My rookie year in the NFL, next to me in my locker was Cleveland Gary. And Bill Hawkins was on my defense. And Robert Bailey lived with me. Believe me, we talked about that for 16 weeks straight. Cleveland had the fumble to — there was a lot of respect. The Miami guys were ‘What an atmosphere, what a game.’ But the shirt, I heard an earful about that. It was great fodder. Here we were, two or three years removed from that game in the NFL, in that locker room we had Todd Lyght, Frank Stams and me and, I don’t want to forget anyone else, but we had a ton of Notre Dame guys who played in that game and a bunch of Miami guys that played in that game. It was a fun, fun, fun atmosphere. 

What do you remember about gameday, specifically the build-up to it? 

Pat Terrell: It’s funny, you play so many years in the NFL and a lot of games in college, I remember more about that pregame and the night before and the game itself than probably any other game I’ve played in. I just remember getting up in the morning and it was a beautiful, beautiful day. A little crisp, a little wind, a little breeze and the whole day was gorgeous.

For me personally, I had so much family, I had so many family members come up for the game. Remember, I’m from Florida, so I had a ton of family there. I was relieved that the weather was good for them — I didn’t really care — and I just remember that, oh my gosh, just the electric atmosphere as we rolled up in the bus and walked through campus after mass, it was special. It was different.

Older fans, they were fired up because they wanted revenge from the (Faust) game (in which Miami won 58-7 in 1985, former coach Gerry Faust's final game at Notre Dame), and the younger fans just bought up the hype. It was funny, because I do remember just whispering to my teammates, these fans aren’t even playing and they’re — they’re like Cubs fans (now), they want this game, I can’t say more than we did but they were equally motivated. 

What was coach Holtz’s message in the days before the game? (We all know about his “Save Jimmy Johnson’s ass for me” line) Was it different, the same, what was it?

Pat Terrell: Coach Holtz had a very good way of relying on consistency. He would give us a formula to be successful in winning. I can’t remember it exactly, but it was seven areas: no big plays, no turnovers, win the special teams battle. And he proved to us over and over, if we succeed in five out of those seven areas, we will win the game. … Internally, he’s telling us, there’s no way we can lose this game if we execute in those seven areas.

So leading up to the game, I’ve never seen him more emotionally fired up in a pregame speech. It was amazing. But as far as him, he was very consistent on, that’s how he prepared us to play Rice or SMU, he was very consistent. It was a special game. Practice was extremely intense. He’s always a stickler for perfection. … You can’t have your hand in front of the line or behind the line, it had to be on the line. And that was just kind of his attention to detail, and it had never been so evident in that week. But he also instilled confidence in us, talking about respect and not flinching. He was fired up. 

So take me through the moment that went a long way toward cementing your legacy at Notre Dame, batting down that pass. What do you remember about the read you had on that play? Did you know immediately you had a shot to get your hand on it?

Pat Terrell: Right before the play, coach Alvarez — Barry Alvarez, he’s at Wisconsin now, he was our defensive coordinator — he had a calm demeanor about himself. He had complete confidence in us at all times. And we had a TV timeout or something, we came to the sideline, and he just kind of calmed us down. He looked each one of us in the eye and said hey look, we’re going to win this game. Go out there and execute. We’ve practiced what we have to do. And for me personally, it was so exciting. You got caught up in the moment. As a defensive back, you want the quarterback to throw it to your man. That’s the mentality that I had. I hope he throws it to my guy because you don’t want to have to cover somebody for five or six seconds.

So with that confidence — you don’t have that confidence if you’re playing scared — one of the things coach Alvarez did is fortunately we were able to watch on film Miami a few weeks before against Michigan State when they had a very important goal line play. And typically when you scout a team, the playbook shrinks when it gets down there around the goal line. It’s college, you just don’t have time to prepare for 12 different plays. You’re going to have your favorites and you’re just going to execute those. So we knew what Miami wanted to do.

So the first thing I was doing was trying to get recognition on a play. So when the formation came out and it looked familiar, my confidence level went up a little bit. What was kind of ironic and funny, though, is the guy who I was covering, it was kind of a flashback, I played against Leonard Conley all though high school. We were big rivals. And so that was kind of neat, one of those ‘here we go again.’ He was a big player on his high school, I was a big player on my high school. That was fun. If it wasn’t for George Williams, I remember, he hit Leonard quick. He gave me a great move to the inside and broke out and I was just fighting to get in position.

When the ball was up I was just like, you know, it’s one of those things, I was just praying to let me have some hang time. And obviously from all my teammates, they said okay, you should’ve caught it. But I was just so focused on knocking that ball down.

And it’s never personal — when I knocked that ball down, it was a win for the entire university. At that point it was almost like being a fan of the game. I was so excited that we won, not that I made a play. And then fast-forward, in my NFL career, to be frank with you I almost kind of got tired of people talking about that play. I was like hey, I spent four year at Notre Dame, I did a few more things while I was there — I had a 60-yard pick six (in the Miami game), which defensive backs really love that.

But it probably wasn’t until I had kids, when you walk back on campus — and one of the reasons you go to a place like Notre Dame is its reputation and high standards and tradition, and to be able to make it and have your name associated with the tradition, I appreciate that play way more now than I did even a decade after. I’ve said it several times as a joke, but the stadium held, what, 59,000 people before expansion? I swear, I think I’ve met 80,000 people that weren’t just at the game, but were sitting right in that corner. ‘I was right there in that corner when you knocked that ball down!’ That’s been kind of funny.

But like I said, I’d be lying if I didn’t tell you when you go back on campus, and now people remember you for that play and being a part of that huge game, it’s a special feeling. It was an intense game. There were so many big plays made by so many players on both sides of the ball. I just think it was a true thrill to be a part of that win. 

Were you able take a moment to yourself after the game to collect your emotions and thoughts, or was it just such a whirlwind that it didn’t stop?

Pat Terrell: It was emotional. I remember after I made the play, I was so excited that we won, that as I was jogging back from the end zone to the sideline, and being from Florida and having my mom and dad there — and I remember I got kind of emotional because my grandmother passed away earlier that year. And the reason that was significant, my grandmother passed away in training camp of the ’88 season. I wrote her name on my footband, my wristband. I remember just feeling really emotional about that. That what I was thinking about.

But when she passed away earlier in the season, I missed the team photo. So think about it: of any team photo to miss, don’t miss the ’88 national championship team photo, right? And so, believe it or not, coach Holtz remembered that so after we won the championship, it was right before we went to the White House, he rescheduled when we got back we were going to re-take the team photo. And I really thought that was special, he was doing that for me. And then when we got back, the worst thing in the world that could’ve happened, happened, and we lost a teammate who died of congenial heart failure, an enlarged heart that no one knew. Bobby Satterfield. And he passed away, and so there was no way I wanted to re-take that picture without him in it.

So yeah, to bring a long story around, that’s what I was thinking about when I was running back. I didn’t really realize the magnitude of that play. The magnitude really grew after the championship, because you look back, we had a great season and that was a pivotal point in the season, beating No. 1 Miami and we went on to win the national championship. But I’ll tell you what, that game was way more intense than the championship game. We played USC, one against two that year too, and that was intense but it still couldn’t match the intensity of the Miami game. It’s kind of fun to celebrate it now.

High School Lites Week 10 capsules and picks

High School Lites Week 10 capsules and picks

CSN Chicago will have cameras covering the biggest high school football games across Chicagoland on the Week 10 edition of High School Lites, coming your way Saturday night at 11 p.m. after Cubs Postseason Live. Can Maine South beat West Aurora in this terrific Class 8A opening game? Can Lyons Township upset Naperville North on CSN Friday night in Naperville? Who wins the unofficial Tyson LeBlanc Bowl when Curie takes on Oswego East? And can the T.F. South Rebels extend the coaching career of retiring head coach Tom Padjen with a win over Rock Island?

Class 8A

No. 19 Lyons Township (7-2) at No. 14 Naperville North (8-1) Friday 7 p.m.

Live broadcast on CSN, plus a live stream available on CSNChicago.com and the NBC Sports app.

EDGY's Take: Lyons Township features one of the top junior quarterbacks in the state in Ben Bryant and the Lions also have plenty of skills. Naperville North and head coach Sean Drendell will unleash its Thunder and Lightning backfield in senior RB Cross Robinson and senior RB Eric Wright and the Huskies also have a very good senior led offensive line. Biggest matchup to watch here? The Naperville North offensive line versus a very good Lyons Township defensive line.

EDGY's Pick: Naperville North 28, Lyons Township 21

No. 23 Leyden (7-2) at No. 10 Barrington (8-1) Friday 7 p.m.

EDGY's Take: Leyden and head coach Tom Cerasani are back in the state playoff field for the first time since 2012. The Eagles will look toward standout athlete Jalen Moore (SIU) and a strong running game to center their attack. Barrington will also run the football. They’re led by a big, strong and physical offensive line and a speedy backfield with senior RB Logan Moews and senior QB Ray Niro. Can Leyden's defense contain the Broncos’ speedy backs? Can Barrington get a handle on Moore?

EDGY's Pick: Barrington 29, Leyden 13

No. 26 Maine South (6-3) at No. 7 West Aurora (9-0) Friday 7 p.m.

EDGY's Take: Maine South is never shy when it comes to having its spread offense scoring points in bunches. Keep an eye out for senior QB Nick Leongas along with junior RB Fotis Kokosioulis. It also features a solid offensive line led by senior four star-ranked OL Kevin Jarvis (Michigan State). Coach Nate Eimer’s West Aurora Blackhawks feature speed on both sides of the ball. You'll be impressed with the Cross twins: senior RB/DB DaQuan Cross and senior RB/DB DaVion Cross. Can the Blackhawks defense slow down Maine South? Can the Maine South defense avoid allowing the Warriors from breaking open big plays? 

EDGY's Pick: Maine South 36, West Aurora 34

No. 17 Curie (8-1) at No. 16 Oswego East (8-1) Saturday 1 p.m.

EDGY's Take: Oswego East head coach Tyson LeBlanc coached at Curie from 2007-11 and guided the Condors to the state playoffs in all five seasons. This season, Curie is led by head coach Jay McDonagh. Keep an eye out for senior RB/LB Anthony Watson. Oswego East can score points in a hurry with senior RB Ivory Kelly-Martin (Iowa). They also boast a solid defense, featuring senior DE Elijah James (Central Michigan). Can Curie win away from the city of Chicago? Can Oswego East handle the physicality from the Condors?

EDGY's Pick: Oswego East 24, Curie 19

No. 18 Lincoln-Way East (7-2) vs. No. 15 Taft (8-1) at Lane Stadium Saturday 11 a.m.

EDGY's Take: Lincoln-Way East will hit the road in the opening round, heading to the North Side to take on Taft, which won the Chicago Public League’s Big Shoulders conference. East is led by senior QB Jake Arthur, senior RB Nigel Muhammed and a roster of well over 100 players. Taft is led by QB Abdullah Ahmad. Also, keep an eye on senior OL/DL Adam Gago for the Eagles. Can Taft go toe to toe with Lincoln-Way East for four quarters?   

EDGY's Pick: Lincoln-Way East 37, Taft 13

Class 7A

No. 24 Carmel (5-4) at No. 9 St. Charles North (8-1) Saturday 1 p.m.

EDGY's Take: Carmel and veteran head coach Andy Bitto has had an up-and-down season. But when the Corsairs’ option attack is clicking — led by senior QB Jeremy Strutzel and junior WB/S Zaire Barnes — look out. St. Charles North's only loss came back in Week 4 to rival St. Charles East. Can the North’s defense find the football against Carmel’s option game? Can the Corsairs defense slow down a North Stars offense led by senior QB Zach Mettetal and senior WR Griffin Hammer (Colorado State)? 

EDGY's Pick: St. Charles North 28, Carmel 24

No. 21 McHenry (6-3) at No. 12 Batavia (7-2) Saturday 1:30 p.m.

EDGY's Take: McHenry is back in the state playoff field for the first time since 2007. The Warriors and first year head coach Nat Zunkle feature a passing attack led by QB Colton Klein. The defense is led by senior LB Colton Folliard. As for coach Dennis Piroon’s Batavia Bulldogs, it’s all about getting the running game in gear. Junior RB Reggie Phillips will run behind a big and physical offensive line led by senior OT Evan Day (Illinois State). Can McHenry slow down the Batavia running game? Can the Batavia defense rebound from a rough Week 9 performance and raise its game another level against McHenry?

EDGY's Pick: Batavia 27, McHenry 21

Class 6A

No. 11 Rock Island (7-2) at No. 6 Thornton Fractional South (7-2) Friday 7 p.m.

EDGY's Take: T.F. South veteran head coach Tom Padjen announced earlier this week that this will be his last season leading the Rebels football program, wrapping up his 40-year coaching career. The Rebels will look to extend Padjen’s final season — and they’re led by the coach’s nephew, senior QB Reis Padjen, along with senior WR Bron Hill and a very quick defense. Rock Island is led by former Lake Zurich head coach Bryan Stortz and the Rocks rely on senior QB Alek Jacobs. He has thrown for nearly 4,000 career passing yards and his main target is WR Jacob Ellis (6-foot-7, 215 pounds). So which defense can slow down the other team's passing game? 

EDGY's Pick: TF South 31, Rock Island 28

Class 5A

No. 10 Metamora (6-3) at No. 7 Kankakee (6-3) Saturday 2 p.m.

EDGY's Take: Both Metamora and Kankakee want to run the football and both can play strong defense. Hall of Fame head coach Pat Ryan has led the visiting Redbirds to 23 state playoff appearances. Their playmakers include RBs Jon Brunton and Ethan Hodel, while sophomore QB Thomas Hall is more than capable in the play-action passing game. Kankakee is back in the state playoff for the first time since 2009. The Kays and head coach Omar Grant will give the football to RB DeAndre Caldwell early and often. Can Metamora win on the road and avoid the turnover monster that's followed them quite a bit this season? Can the Kays win time of possession and also break open a big special teams score or two?

EDGY's Pick: Kankakee 28, Metamora 21