Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

CHICAGO BULLS & CHICAGO WHITE SOX CHAIRMAN JERRY REINSDORF TO BE THE NEXT FEATURED GUESTON COMCAST SPORTSNETS MONTHLY INTERVIEW SERIES, INSIDE LOOK

Inside Look presented by Cadillac, hosted by Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien, featuring Jerry Reinsdorf
to debut Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM

CSNChicago.com to provide additional web extras coverage of Inside Look, including extended video clips
Chicago, IL (March 8, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac.

Debuting Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM -- which tips-off a huge night on Bulls programming on Comcast SportsNet with a special, one-hour edition of McDonalds Bulls Pre-Game Live airing at 7:30 PM, followed by an Eastern Conference showdown featuring the Bulls hosting the rival Miami Heat at 8:30 PM -- Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Bulls & White Sox Chairman JERRY REINSDORF.
Reinsdorf discusses everything in this forthright interview including his good fortune of buying the Bulls franchise in 1985, winning the World Series in 2005, winning six NBA Championships in the 1990s, winning the NBA Draft Lottery allowing the Bulls to draft the reigning MVP Derrick Rose, his thoughts on what made Michael Jordan one of the greatest players in NBA history and much more. Plus Reinsdorf also tells the story about the first time he met Jordan, the best White Sox team hes ever had (and its not the 2005 championship team), and he receives a special, surprise visit during the interview from former White Sox All-Star slugger Jim Thome.

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNets website, CSNChicago.com, for additional web extras interview content never before seen on TV. Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet.

Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf on the following datestimes: Wed, Mar. 14 at 11:30pm - Fri, Apr. 6 at 4:30pm - Wed, Apr. 11 at 2:30pm - Fri, Apr. 13 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 15 at 8pm - Wed, Apr. 18 at 11pm - Thu, Apr. 19 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 22 at 2pm and 8:30pm & Wed, Apr. 25 at 9pm.

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf presented by Cadillac premiering Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM on Comcast SportsNet:

REINSDORF on the White Sox winning the 2005 World Series:

"In the spring of 2005, I said this is going to be my 25th year, maybe we're never going to win a World Series. I don't know if it will ever happen. And then it happened. I am still appreciating the moment. The moment wasn't when we won...I mean that was exciting, you know my God we won the World Series...although it wasn't a shock because we were up three games to nothing. What really happened to make it sink in was the parade. There were two million people, there wasn't one arrest, there wasn't one incident. You could see the love coming to the players from those people. Then there were people coming up to me telling me they had gone to the cemetery and decorated their parents or grandparents graves. You could go to any cemetery in Chicago and the graves were decorated with White Sox paraphernalia. And then the next spring a gentleman came up to me in the parking lot and said my father died 15 minutes after the last out, he knew and he died happy. Those things will never, ever leave me.

REINSDORF on his luck buying the Bulls:

"There's been luck at everything I've ever done. (White Sox Executive Vice President) Howard Pizer and I have a little joke between us when we have a problem and can't figure out the solution to the problem. I'll say to Howard, what are we going to do? And Howard's answer will be, well, we'll get lucky, because everything I've ever done, I've had a tremendous amount of good luck. A little bad luck along the way, but the good luck so outweighs it. In that case, the good luck was they had drafted Michael Jordan. At the time we made the deal, no one knew what Michael Jordan was going to be, and I don't think they would have sold the team if they had known what he was going to be. So clearly, I was lucky."

REINSDORF on winning six NBA titles with the Bulls:

I was incredibly proud to be associated with the Chicago Bulls and what they had done. The Bulls are a worldwide phenomenonled by Michael (Jordan), but it was a great team. You have to give Jerry Krause a lot of credit because the only two players who were on the second 3-peat that were on the first 3-peat were Michael and Scottie (Pippen).

What Jerry said was Organizations win championships and it is true. Now, players are part of the organization. At the end of the day, the players have to win the game. But how did they get there? Who put them together? They didn't just drop out of the sky. They have to be coached...they have to have physical training. It really takes a whole organization, but a great organization has to have great players.

REINSDORF on winning the NBA Draft Lottery in 2008 (despite having just a 1.7 chance), which allowed the Bulls to draft reigning NBA MVP Derrick Rose:

Two months before (the NBA Draft Lottery), John Paxson and I were talking and Paxson said, 'Where are we going to get a point guard? We've got to get a point guard. I said, 'I don't know, we'll win the lottery, we'll take Derrick Rose. I knew he was going to be a very good player. I can't say I expected him to be an MVP in his third year. What's really good is that he's grounded. He really hasn't changed since he got here. He comes from a solid background. He was protected when he was growing up. He is a lot like Michael in that he just wants to win basketball games.

Bears add power on RB depth chart with Indiana’s Jordan Howard in Round 5

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Bears add power on RB depth chart with Indiana’s Jordan Howard in Round 5

Running back, one of the foundation pillars of Chicago Bears football, was in some turmoil this offseason. First was the exit of Matt Forte. Then was the failed pursuit of Denver’s C.J. Anderson, a statement that while the Bears were pleased with the futures of Ka’Deem Carey and Jeremy Langford, those two were not necessarily the future of the offense, particularly in situations calling for raw power.

Accordingly, the Bears went big in the fifth round, using the 150th pick of the draft on Indiana running back Jordan Howard, a 230-pound force who averaged more than 123 yards from scrimmage in his combined 32 collegiate games at UAB and Indiana.

At 230 pounds, Howard eschews subtle.

“I feel like I’m a grinder,” Howard said. “I can get those tough yards and in the NFL. You don’t really see those long, explosive runs like you see in college. There are a few, but not many, so I feel my game suits the NFL more than it does college.”

It also appears to suit the Bears, who have struggled too often over the past several years in short-yardage and goal-line situations.

Howard, however, may need to tweak his game just a bit.

Big running backs like Earl Campbell, Larry Csonka and Christian Okoye have had success spikes but not always sustained at those peak levels. The reason: Big backs deliver big hits but they also take more of them, and hits take their toll. John Riggins (240 pounds) extended his Hall of Fame career using speed that away from tacklers rather than taking all of them on.

Howard has a smash-mouth mindset but NFL tacklers will be substantial tiers above what he ran into at Indiana. And he missed time last year with knee and ankle injuries that limited him to nine games, in addition to averaging 216 carries per season for his three college years.

Still, “I feel like my size will benefit me well because a lot of time guys they won’t want to tackle me a lot of times, especially after long games when we’ve just been pounding,” Howard said. “They then start diving and then I can avoid them. I think it works very well for me.”

(Hard to see Aaron Donald, Luke Kuechly, Julius Peppers and J.J. Watt “diving,” but you never know.)

Howard will not be doing a lot of diving himself. He carries a decided chip on his shoulder after getting just one scholarship offer (UAB) coming out of high school, then having UAB drop football while he was there.

"Yeah definitely some pride because coming out of high school I had one offer to play at UAB in Conference USA, so I definitely wanted to prove I could play on a bigger stage," he said. "And I was doing it for UAB because they shut the program down. I wore my heart on my sleeve for them."

Adam Warren emerging as essential piece on Cubs pitching staff

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Adam Warren emerging as essential piece on Cubs pitching staff

Adam Warren was the lowest-profile addition of the Cubs' offseason, but he's already emerged as a vital part of the team out to the hottest start in baseball.

Jason Heyward, John Lackey and Ben Zobrist (plus the re-arrival of Dexter Fowler in spring training) got all the headlines as new acquisitons over the winter.

In fact, Warren wasn't even the main focus in the deal that made him a Cub as the return from the New York Yankees for Starlin Castro, the former face of the franchise who tallied 991 hits in six seasons in Chicago.

Yet where would the Cubs be right now without Warren?

The 28-year-old right-hander has pitched the most innings in the National League without giving up an earned run this season (8) and has allowed just two hits and three walks for a sparkling 0.625 WHIP.

"Just as I thought: outstanding," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said. "I try not to abuse him, pretty much. ... I"m very comfortable pitching him in the latter part of the game, whether it's the seventh, eighth, ninth — it doesn't matter to me. 

"I think this guy could finish games. He's got that kinda ability; he's got that makeup. You got that kinda weapon in your toolbox — he's good against righties and lefties, he's durable, he's got all this variety of different pitches, fits our culture beautifully. I just don't want to abuse the guy."

Warren has worked as a starter in the past and said the Cubs initially told him they wanted him to work in the rotation at some point down the road. 

But for right now, Warren is set as a jack of all trades in the bullpen pitching with confidence.

"I like being versatile," Warren said. "I like being able to do a lot of different things. So if I can continue to do that, that's where I like to be in the bullpen, just because I feel like that helps our team out the most."

Warren — like the rest of the Cubs — doesn't like to think too far ahead. He doesn't worry about what his "title" is in the bullpen, which is a necessary attitude to have with a manager that loves to play the matchups and is constantly tinkering with his relievers.

But Warren has emerged as a high-leverage arm Maddon can combine with Pedro Strop (2.89 ERA, 0.64 WHIP, 4 holds) and Hector Rondon (0.00 ERA, 0.29 WHIP, 4 saves) at the back end of the bullpen.

As the new guy on the pitching staff, Warren made it a point to get out to a good start.

"With a new team, you really want to prove yourself," he said. "So I think you have that chip on your shoulder a little bit to want to go out there and start off hot. But really, I think it's just going out there, having a gameplan with our scouting report and just executing."

Warren feels comfortable with his new team and in the bullpen, crediting his teammates and the Cubs coaching staff for welcoming him in.

Coming from the Yankees — a historic franchise with 27 World Series championships and a penchant for doing things a certain way (such as their no facial hair policy) — it was a little bit of a culture shock for Warren to come to a Cubs team that hasn't won the World Series in more than a century and essentially has no rules in a clubhouse designed to let everybody be themselves.

But the transition has gone as smoothly as possible, Warren said.

"It's completely different," he said. "Here, they've created the atmosphere of just be yourself, be laid back. I like that. I like being able to grow facial hair if you want.

"You start focusing completely on baseball. The atmosphere that fans create out there has been unreal to me. Even when it's been cold, they've been up for every pitch. It's really refreshing to see the excitement around the team."

Bears hope they found another Peanut Tillman with CB Deiondre’ Hall

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Bears hope they found another Peanut Tillman with CB Deiondre’ Hall

In the second round of the 2003 draft the Bears took a flyer on a tall cornerback out of a smaller school. Now they have gone a similar route, hoping to land another Charles Tillman.

At the very least they secured a tall cornerback from a smaller school who WANTS to be another Charles Tillman.

Deiondre’ Hall, 6-2, 190 pounds, became a Bear with the team’s third pick in the fourth round of the 2016 draft. Hall comes out of Northern Iowa with 13 career interceptions, six returned for touchdowns, with another 28 passes broken up.

In the Tillman tradition he also finished with four forced fumbles, three of those his senior season.

His role model, “for cornerback, me personally, I’ve always loved him, is Charles Tillman,” Hall said. “Just being a ballhawk and getting that ball. That’s something that’s been huge to me throughout my time at Northern Iowa… .

“I’ve always kind of tried to model my game after him. Like I said, just being a ballhawk and getting that ball out. That’s one of the key emphasis throughout my time at Northern Iowa. Not basically mimicking his game but taking bits and pieces and adding it to mine.”

The turnover bits and pieces of his game will be welcome additions for a team that totaled just 17 total turnovers last season and whose cornerbacks (Kyle Fuller, Tracy Porter) combined for just three interceptions.

But Hall has started at linebacker, is a physical defensive back, and is likely to get at least a look at safety as well. There his football template changes.

“For safety positions, I’ve always kind of saw myself as a ‘Honey Badger,’” Hall said, referencing Arizona Cardinals All-Pro defensive back Tyrann Mathieu. “Being able to play a little corner, coming down in the slot and guarding those quicker guys and being able to stay up top and cover ground. That’s huge in the game these days.”