Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

Bulls & White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf to be next featured guest on 'Inside Look' (debuts Wed, Mar. 14 at 7:00 PM)

CHICAGO BULLS & CHICAGO WHITE SOX CHAIRMAN JERRY REINSDORF TO BE THE NEXT FEATURED GUESTON COMCAST SPORTSNETS MONTHLY INTERVIEW SERIES, INSIDE LOOK

Inside Look presented by Cadillac, hosted by Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien, featuring Jerry Reinsdorf
to debut Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM

CSNChicago.com to provide additional web extras coverage of Inside Look, including extended video clips
Chicago, IL (March 8, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac.

Debuting Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM -- which tips-off a huge night on Bulls programming on Comcast SportsNet with a special, one-hour edition of McDonalds Bulls Pre-Game Live airing at 7:30 PM, followed by an Eastern Conference showdown featuring the Bulls hosting the rival Miami Heat at 8:30 PM -- Comcast SportsNets Chuck Garfien hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Bulls & White Sox Chairman JERRY REINSDORF.
Reinsdorf discusses everything in this forthright interview including his good fortune of buying the Bulls franchise in 1985, winning the World Series in 2005, winning six NBA Championships in the 1990s, winning the NBA Draft Lottery allowing the Bulls to draft the reigning MVP Derrick Rose, his thoughts on what made Michael Jordan one of the greatest players in NBA history and much more. Plus Reinsdorf also tells the story about the first time he met Jordan, the best White Sox team hes ever had (and its not the 2005 championship team), and he receives a special, surprise visit during the interview from former White Sox All-Star slugger Jim Thome.

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNets website, CSNChicago.com, for additional web extras interview content never before seen on TV. Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet.

Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf on the following datestimes: Wed, Mar. 14 at 11:30pm - Fri, Apr. 6 at 4:30pm - Wed, Apr. 11 at 2:30pm - Fri, Apr. 13 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 15 at 8pm - Wed, Apr. 18 at 11pm - Thu, Apr. 19 at 4:30pm - Sun, Apr. 22 at 2pm and 8:30pm & Wed, Apr. 25 at 9pm.

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with Jerry Reinsdorf presented by Cadillac premiering Wednesday, March 14 at 7:00 PM on Comcast SportsNet:

REINSDORF on the White Sox winning the 2005 World Series:

"In the spring of 2005, I said this is going to be my 25th year, maybe we're never going to win a World Series. I don't know if it will ever happen. And then it happened. I am still appreciating the moment. The moment wasn't when we won...I mean that was exciting, you know my God we won the World Series...although it wasn't a shock because we were up three games to nothing. What really happened to make it sink in was the parade. There were two million people, there wasn't one arrest, there wasn't one incident. You could see the love coming to the players from those people. Then there were people coming up to me telling me they had gone to the cemetery and decorated their parents or grandparents graves. You could go to any cemetery in Chicago and the graves were decorated with White Sox paraphernalia. And then the next spring a gentleman came up to me in the parking lot and said my father died 15 minutes after the last out, he knew and he died happy. Those things will never, ever leave me.

REINSDORF on his luck buying the Bulls:

"There's been luck at everything I've ever done. (White Sox Executive Vice President) Howard Pizer and I have a little joke between us when we have a problem and can't figure out the solution to the problem. I'll say to Howard, what are we going to do? And Howard's answer will be, well, we'll get lucky, because everything I've ever done, I've had a tremendous amount of good luck. A little bad luck along the way, but the good luck so outweighs it. In that case, the good luck was they had drafted Michael Jordan. At the time we made the deal, no one knew what Michael Jordan was going to be, and I don't think they would have sold the team if they had known what he was going to be. So clearly, I was lucky."

REINSDORF on winning six NBA titles with the Bulls:

I was incredibly proud to be associated with the Chicago Bulls and what they had done. The Bulls are a worldwide phenomenonled by Michael (Jordan), but it was a great team. You have to give Jerry Krause a lot of credit because the only two players who were on the second 3-peat that were on the first 3-peat were Michael and Scottie (Pippen).

What Jerry said was Organizations win championships and it is true. Now, players are part of the organization. At the end of the day, the players have to win the game. But how did they get there? Who put them together? They didn't just drop out of the sky. They have to be coached...they have to have physical training. It really takes a whole organization, but a great organization has to have great players.

REINSDORF on winning the NBA Draft Lottery in 2008 (despite having just a 1.7 chance), which allowed the Bulls to draft reigning NBA MVP Derrick Rose:

Two months before (the NBA Draft Lottery), John Paxson and I were talking and Paxson said, 'Where are we going to get a point guard? We've got to get a point guard. I said, 'I don't know, we'll win the lottery, we'll take Derrick Rose. I knew he was going to be a very good player. I can't say I expected him to be an MVP in his third year. What's really good is that he's grounded. He really hasn't changed since he got here. He comes from a solid background. He was protected when he was growing up. He is a lot like Michael in that he just wants to win basketball games.

Expansion of the College Football Playoff field continues to seem inevitable

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USA TODAY

Expansion of the College Football Playoff field continues to seem inevitable

There were six teams deserving of reaching the College Football Playoff this season. But there were only four spots.

But what if there were more spots?

An expansion of the Playoff field to eight teams has seemed inevitable from the day the four-team system was announced. Four more Playoff games means oodles more TV viewers, which means oodles more dollars.

And then we wouldn't be having all these arguments, either — but that's nonsense because of course we would, trying to figure out who got snubbed from the expanded bracket.

But this season's emphasis on the conference-champion debate might kick the efforts to expand the Playoff into high gear. Just take it from NCAA president Mark Emmert.

Now, technically speaking, there are 10 FBS conferences, each of which crowns a champion at the end of every football season. Emmert is obviously referring to the Power Five conferences: the Big Ten, Big 12, ACC, Pac-12 and SEC. He might want to pick his words a bit more carefully, considering he represents the other five conferences — the American, Conference USA, the MAC, the Mountain West and the Sun Belt — too, but his point remains understood.

This season has sparked a ton of controversy as the Playoff selection committee opted for the first time to include a team that did not win its conference, Ohio State, and it picked the Buckeyes over the Big Ten champs, Penn State. Plus, Big 12 champion Oklahoma was passed over in favor of non-champion Ohio State, too, actually falling behind another non-champion from the Big Ten, Michigan, in the final Playoff rankings.

With that decision brought the reasonable question of how much a conference championship should matter in getting a team into the final four and competing for a national championship.

The Playoff committee's mission is to pick the country's four best teams, and there aren't many people out there that will argue that Ohio State isn't one of the country's four best teams. But there's something to be said for winning a conference championship because if the Buckeyes can waltz into the Playoff without even playing in the Big Ten title game, why even have a conference championship game — besides, obviously, earning one more night of big-time TV money.

And so the call for an expanded Playoff bracket has reached perhaps its greatest volume in the short time the Playoff has existed. The obvious solution to Power Five conference champions continually being boxed out is to lock in five spots on the bracket for the five conference champions. Then, guarantee a spot for the highest-ranked team from the Group of Five conferences, and you're left with two "at-large" spots that this season would've gone to Ohio State and Michigan, two of the highest-profile programs in the country sure to drive TV viewership in battles against conference-champion Alabama, Clemson, Washington, Penn State and Oklahoma teams. And P.J. Fleck's undefeated Western Michigan squad takes the final slot.

That's quite the field. But if you think it would've solved all this year's problems, you're wrong. Still there would've been outcry that red-hot USC didn't make the field. The Trojans are playing so well that they could very well win the whole thing, despite their three early season losses. That debate over snubs will exist forever, no matter the size of the field, something we see play out each and every season in the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

Also, what a damper an expanded bracket would put on the final few weeks of the regular season. Ohio State's game against Michigan, the highest-rated game of the college football season with more than 16 million people watching, would've been effectively meaningless. No matter who won or lost, both teams would've made that eight-team field, right?

Additionally, another round of Playoff football would expand the season to 16 games for some teams. That means more physical demands on student-athletes and a season cutting deep into January, which would impact their educational and time demands.

But again, an expansion of the Playoff bracket has always seemed inevitable. There's too much money to be made, and at the same time fans seem to be all about that idea. People love the postseason for good reason, and the win-or-go-home nature of the NFL playoffs make those games the most-watched sporting events of the year.

Now the NCAA president is chiming in with hopes of an expanded field. So really isn't it just a matter of time?

Road Ahead: Blackhawks dealing with rash of injuries

Road Ahead: Blackhawks dealing with rash of injuries

CSN's Chris Boden and Tracey Myers have the latest on the Blackhawks in the Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland and NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

From an injury standpoint, it's been a tough few weeks for the Blackhawks.

The Blackhawks are down two key players in captain Jonathan Toews and goaltender Corey Crawford, and now may be without defenseman Brent Seabrook who sustained an upper-body injury in Tuesday's victory over the Arizona Coyotes.

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While the Blackhawks haven't had much luck on the injury front, their upcoming two opponents are in the same boat.

"You look at the New York Rangers, a very talented team, but this is what every team goes through every season. Your depth gets tested," Myers said.

Check out what else Boden and Myers had to say about the team's upcoming matchups in this week's Honda Road Ahead