Alize Jones could be X (or W) factor in Notre Dame's offense

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Alize Jones could be X (or W) factor in Notre Dame's offense

It’s an awfully lofty compliment when Notre Dame fans compare you favorably to a Michigan player, someone who has to be reflexively hated for the "M" on his maize and blue jersey. 

But that’s what Alize Jones saw come across his Twitter feed when he committed to Notre Dame in January 2015. The athletic 6-foof-4, 240 pound Las Vegas native immediately drew comparisons to Devin Funchess, the former Michigan tight-end-turned-wide-receiver who starred for the Wolverines from 2012-2014. 

“They were all like, guarantee he’s going to be a Devin Funchess,” Jones smiled. 

Jones’ size and athletic ability — as well as a thinned tight end depth chart — opened the door for him to play as a true freshman last fall. That’s a rarity, too: The last Irish tight end to record a reception in his first year on campus was Ben Koyack, who had one catch in 2011. Jones caught 13 passes for 190 yards, highlighted by a 45-yard fourth quarter reception against Temple that set up DeShone Kizer’s game-winning toss to Will Fuller. 

While those numbers represent a solid season for a freshman receiver or tight end — even Fuller only had seven catches his first year — Jones wasn’t close to satisfied with it. 

“Just watching film after practices and games, just seeing all the mistakes that I made, it’s like, man, I didn’t take enough time and I don’t think I took it serious last year,” Jones said during spring practice. “I think that my head was just — personally, I don’t think I was ready for it.”

For Jones, playing as a freshman was an eye-opening experience as he learned what it takes to succeed at the college level. Talent and recruiting hype don’t guarantee a player can arrive on a college campus and play well right away. Jones came to understand the necessity of knowing the entire offense, not just his position, and spent spring practice watching film and meeting with teammates and coaches to improve in that area. 

“His confidence is growing,” offensive coordinator Mike Sanford said, “but it’s real confidence in his knowledge of what we’re doing.”

Armed with that offensive knowledge, and with the freshman jitters gone, Jones seems to be in line for an expanded role, gauging from what we saw during spring practice and comments from his head coach.

“He’s got multi-dimensional opportunities,” coach Brian Kelly said. “He’s a big-time athlete that can do some things for us.”

Some of those things Kelly alluded to include playing receiver on the boundary, which is Notre Dame’s “W” position. With Corey Robinson’s football future still undecided — and even if he does return to play in 2016 — there’s an opening for Jones to be that Funchess-type tight end who makes an impact at receiver. 

Jones said he’s spent plenty of time watching how bigger NFL receivers use their size and athleticism to beat opposing cornerbacks. 

“God’s blessed them with size, blessed me with size. You just gotta use it.,” Jones said. “And it’s tough when a defender has a 6-foot-5 guy, 230 pounds, and you have to defend. What are you gonna do? The ball’s up in the air, you gotta go get it. It’s tough to defend that.”

But Jones doesn’t just watch bigger, Calvin Johnson-esque receivers. He’s studied guys like Fuller — the smaller, quicker variety of receivers. 

“I want to be able to play like a smaller guy but in a big man’s body,” Jones said. “Even though the tight end position has been predicated on bigger guys, I want to still be fast. I want to be that fast guy, that athletic guy where I can play receiver if need be. So I really have been harping on that this offseason.”

Part of the learning curve for Jones, too, was going from playing in front of a few thousand fans at Bishop Gorman High School — Ronnie Stanley’s alma mater, too — to the sold-out crowds at Notre Dame Stadium and hostile road environments like Clemson’s Death Valley. But he’s been there, done that now, and wants games to feel more like practice this fall. 

It’s all adding up to Jones aligning himself to being a key part of Notre Dame’s offensive equation the fall — no matter what position he’s playing. 

“I know what it’s like to play Clemson and Ohio State and teams like that, playing against elite guys,” Jones said. “Now going into my sophomore year, I’ve already done it. It’s just getting comfortable with everything, which I am. So I really feel like all the pieces are coming together.” 

Early 2017 NFL Mock Draft: Who would Bears take?

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Early 2017 NFL Mock Draft: Who would Bears take?

It may be too early for projecting the 2017 NFL Draft, but it can't hurt to look ahead.

Rotoworld's Josh Norris released his mock draft on Thursday for next year's draft.

According to Norris, if the Bears finished in the order of their Super Bowl LI odds, Ryan Pace & Co. would hold the No. 12 pick.

Their selection? Florida State running back Dalvin Cook.

Norris gives his explanation of the pick:

"My personal favorite running back in the class. Cook’s market share of FSU’s rushing yards and percentage of 20-plus yard runs last year was ridiculous."

Also in the first round, Norris has five Big Ten players projected to land in the first 32 picks.

Click here to check out Josh Norris' full 2017 mock draft.

White Sox place Jake Petricka on the 15-day disabled list

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White Sox place Jake Petricka on the 15-day disabled list

The injury bug refuses to leave the White Sox alone.

Just as outfielder Avisail Garcia returned to the lineup on Thursday, reliever Jake Petricka has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a right hip impingement. Petricka is the fourth White Sox player to hit the DL since Alex Avila suffered a right hamstring strain on April 24 and that doesn’t count Garcia, who missed the team’s last four games with a right hamstring strain.

The White Sox recalled Tommy Kahnle from Triple-A Charlotte to take the place of Petricka, who needs at least a week off after his discomfort worsened during a Wednesday bullpen session.

“It’s something he’s been dealing with,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “More than anything, this is something that had to happen. We weren’t going to be able to use him for a week at least to be able get over this. The way he’s throwing, you want him back to feeling 100 percent so you’re not going to go injure anything trying to protect it.

“It’s something that’s there. It was more pronounced yesterday than at any point that he’s brought up. But definitely at the point where we need to take care of this.”

Garcia, who has a five-game hitting streak, finally got cleared after several days of testing his hamstring. Ventura said Wednesday’s test was thorough.

“He says he’s ready to go,” Ventura said. “They tested him pretty good (Wednesday), though.”

Avila is also ready to resume action. His baseball bag was loaded and sitting out in front of his clubhouse stall. He’ll join Triple-A Charlotte on Friday and begin a rehab assignment.

The White Sox also made another pair of moves official on Thursday. The club promoted pitcher Erik Johnson from Charlotte and designated John Danks for assignment. The White Sox 40-man roster now stands at 38 after Danks’ removal.