Concerns rising over safety in auto racing

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Concerns rising over safety in auto racing

From Comcast SportsNet
MILTON KEYNES, England (AP) -- Formula One champion Sebastian Vettel wants motor racing safety improvements following the death of IndyCar driver Dan Wheldon, although drivers accept the dangers involved. The Red Bull driver called Wheldon's death a "big loss" but said risks can not be avoided. "The bottom line is what we do might not be the safest so there is always some risk but we are ready to take that into account because we love racing and we love motor sports and it is dangerous," Vettel said Wednesday. The 33-year-old Wheldon, a two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, died Sunday in a fiery wreck at an IndyCar race in Las Vegas. The last F1 driver killed on the track was Ayrton Senna in 1994. Despite some claims that F1 has become "too safe," Vettel stressed that Wheldon's death shows racing should never stop trying to improve safety. "The last couple of years we've had some big crashes and luckily no big injuries or worse than that," the 24-year-old German driver said. "We should never give up on trying to make racing safer in general." Vettel was back at the Red Bull team factory on Wednesday to celebrate becoming the youngest two-time F1 champion. He insisted motivation would not be lacking over the season's final three races as he is three wins away from matching Michael Schumacher's record of 13 victories in a season and two pole positions away from equaling Nigel Mansell's record 14. "It's been an extremely successful year, especially when you start to realize what we have achieved so far and the season is not over yet. Winning the championship with four races to go is something that doesn't happen every day," Vettel said. "(But) if you expect to stay unbeatable then that is the first day you will be beaten." Vettel and his Red Bull team principal Christian Horner said the priority now was to ensure teammate Mark Webber finished the season with a race win and second-place in the drivers' standings with the team having already clinched the constructors' championship. Fourth-place Webber trails current runner-up Jenson Button by only 13 points. Vettel said improved maturity made his second title easier than his first -- when he won the last race to edge Fernando Alonso of Ferrari -- and even made mention of a long-term goal of Schumacher's seven career championships. But he quickly backed off from lofty ambitions, too. "I don't really set myself a target for wins, records," Vettel said. "I'm not racing for stats." Vettel clinched the title in Japan and then won the subsequent Korean GP on Sunday, only returning home after that, and to a cold house. "It was quite cold so I put the fire on. I have a problem with the heating," Vettel said of the first thing he did after getting home as two-time world champion.

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Here are some of the top Chicago sports stories from Monday:

Five Things to Watch: Blackhawks collide with Avalanche tonight on CSN

Five Things to Watch: Bulls host Mavericks in search of third straight win

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

Blackhawks' rough weekend 'a little bit of a wake-up call'

The state of the Bulls after the first half of the season

Reports: Dolphins assistant Jeremiah Washburn to be Bears' new O-line coach

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

President Obama, with Cubs at White House: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan'

At Cubs' White House visit, President Obama touts Michelle Obama's Cubs fandom, shouts out Jose Cardenal

Fire trade for midfielder Dax McCarty

The state of the Bulls after the first half of the season

The state of the Bulls after the first half of the season

Who are the Bulls? The team that beat Cleveland and Toronto or lost to Dallas, Minnesota and Milwaukee?

That's the question Bulls fans are currently asking and the one Bulls Insider Vincent Goodwill posed in the video above.

The Bulls have had impressive wins and shocking losses, but neither of those should be surprising at this point. The Bulls are, as Goodwill put it, consistently inconsistent.

The first half of the season has proven that Dwyane Wade still has some memorable moments left to give and Jimmy Butler continues to approach superstardom. On the downside, the drama surrounding Rajon Rondo has meant the 'three alphas' that were hyped up in the preseason haven't been the dynamic trio some Bulls fans had hoped.

Coach Fred Hoiberg doesn't have the shooters his system needs, but can he still rally the troops and get something out of Rondo?

Watch the video to see Goodwill's look back on the Bulls' first half and what could be ahead.