CSN Chicago nominated for eight ChicagoMidwest Emmy Awards

CSN Chicago nominated for eight ChicagoMidwest Emmy Awards

COMCAST SPORTSNET CHICAGO NOMINATED FOR EIGHT CHICAGOMIDWEST EMMY AWARDS

Chicago, IL (September 28, 2011) Comcast SportsNet Chicago, the television home of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, garnered eight Emmy Award nominations from the ChicagoMidwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for the 2010-11 television season. The nominations were announced on September 27 with the awards ceremony to be held in Chicago on Sunday, November 6.

We are honored to receive these nominations from our peers in the industry and we feel they are a reflection of the great work performed by our entire staff, said James J. Corno, President of Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

Note the following Comcast SportsNet Chicago Emmy nominations for the 2010-11 television season:

1) Category 4-g: Outstanding Achievement for News Specialty ReportSeries: HealthScience

Mind and Body: Sarah Lauch, Mike Cappozzo, Todd Williams, Eric Fogle, Don Karulski, Kristina Quinn, Producers; Sarah Kustok, Chuck Garfien, Reporters.

2) Category 5-a: Outstanding Achievement for Sports Programs News Single StoryFeature

The Snack Bowl: Chuck Garfien, Reporter; Mike Cappozzo, James MacNichol, Producers.

3 & 4) Category 5-d: Outstanding Achievement for Sports Programs Program Series

High School Lites: Joe Collins, Aldo Perri, Brett Fisher, Producers; Luke Stuckmeyer, Gail Fischer, Chuck Garfien, Reporters; Charlie Schumacher, Executive Producer.
SportsNet Central, Live from the United Center: John Schippman, Executive Producer; Mark Schanowski, Pat Boyle, Sarah Kustok, Gail Fischer, Luke Stuckmeyer, Reporters; Charlie Schumacher, Kevin Cross, Senior Executive Producers; Ryan McGuffey, Coordinating Producer; Tim Folke, Jeff Nelson, Joe Collins, Eric Fogle, Brian Skonesey, Jeff Korbitz, Mike Cappozzo, Brett Fisher, Producers; Mark Harper, Technical Producer.

5) Category 5-d: Outstanding Achievement for Sports Programs One-Time Special

Stanleys Summer Vacation: John Schippman, Charlie Schumacher, Executive Producers; Chris Boden, Reporter; Mike Cappozzo, Brett Fisher, Julie Bruhn, Kristina Quinn, Dan Taksas, Eric Peterson, Sarah Lauch, Producers.
6) Category 5-e: Outstanding Achievement for Sports Programs Sporting EventGame - LiveUnedited ProgramSpecial

Chicago Bulls Basketball on Comcast SportsNet Chicago: Jim Corno, Jr., Executive Producer; Bob Albrecht, Todd Benjaminson, Producers; James A. Angio, Tamra Anderson, Mark Harper, Co-Producers.

7) Category 11-a: Outstanding Achievement for Special Event Coverage Live

2011 Comcast SportsNet Sports Awards: Jim Corno, Jr., Executive Producer; Mike Leiderman, Producer; Steve Dahl, Host; Jeff Nuich, Associate Producer; Mark Harper, Technical Producer.
8) Category 16-b: Outstanding Achievement for Program Promotion Single SpotCampaign

Fans Best Friend: Kate Hollencamp, Michael Dahl, Jaclene Tetzlaff, Producers.

Carlos Rodon sets White Sox, AL record with seven straight strikeouts to open game

Carlos Rodon sets White Sox, AL record with seven straight strikeouts to open game

White Sox pitcher Carlos Rodon tied an American League and a team record when he started Friday night’s contest with seven consecutive strikeouts against the Minnesota Twins.

Rodon, who struck out 11 in his previous turn on Sunday, matched the mark set by White Sox hurler Joe Cowley on May 28, 1986 in a loss at the Texas Rangers.

Of Rodon’s seven strikeouts, two were on called third strikes by plate umpire Tripp Gibson. Twins outfielder Logan Schafer snapped the streak with a one-out double in the top of the third inning.

Houston’s Jim Deshaies (1986) and the New York Mets’ Jacob de Grom (2014) hold the major league record with eight straight strikeouts to start a game.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

Doug Fister set the AL record with nine consecutive strikeouts in 2012 and Tom Seaver holds the MLB record with 10 straight in 1970.

Combined with Sunday’s start, when he struck out the side in the eighth at the Cleveland Indians, Rodon whiffed 10 straight batters. Rodon’s run is the longest consecutive strikeout streak in the majors since Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Eric Gagne struck out 10 in a row in May 2003.

American sweep and European rally at Ryder Cup

American sweep and European rally at Ryder Cup

CHASKA, Minn. (AP) -- Even with the first opening-session sweep in four decades, the Americans were reminded anew Friday that no lead is safe in the Ryder Cup.

Not after one session. Not after one day.

And based on the last Ryder Cup on American soil, not until it's over.

Europe battled back from a 4-0 deficit behind its best tandem, Henrik Stenson and Justin Rose, and capped off a long and rowdy day at Hazeltine when its best player, Rory McIlroy, holed a 20-foot eagle putt and then mocked the crowd by taking a bow.

The American celebration turned into a consolation.

They had a 5-3 lead, the margin after the first day at Medinah four years ago that ended in another European victory. They lost a chance to really put Europe in a hole.

"It's frustrating not to come out a little bit more ahead," U.S. captain Davis Love III said.

Love could not have scripted a better start - a symbolic one, too.

To honor Arnold Palmer, who died Sunday night, Ryder Cup officials placed on the first tee Palmer's golf bag from when he was captain of the 1975 Ryder Cup team. Jordan Spieth and Patrick Reed then set the tone with a 3-and-2 foursomes victory over Stenson and Rose, and the Americans delivered the first sweep of the opening session since that 1975 team at Laurel Valley.

Phil Mickelson, feeling more pressure than usual because of his influence on changes and on this team, also produced big shots. His wedge into 5 feet that Rickie Fowler converted was key in the Americans winning three straight holes for a 1-up victory over McIlroy and Andy Sullivan.

"With everything going on - me not having a point and Phil being a big part of getting the players a lot more involved to Arnie passing and him being a huge part of the week, this is big for us," Fowler said.

It just didn't last.

"The guys were disappointed with the way they played this morning and the way they performed," European captain Darren Clarke said. "But they showed tremendous bravery and heart and desire to go out and play the way they have done this afternoon."

Beaten for the first time, Rose and Stenson went right back out against Spieth and Reed and handed the American duo its first Ryder Cup loss. The Europeans made nine birdies in 13 holes for a 5-and-4 victory in an afternoon session in which the board was filled with European blue.

Sergio Garcia, who along with Martin Kaymer made only one birdie in a foursomes loss, teamed with fellow Spaniard Rafa Cabrera Bello to dismantle J.B. Holmes and Ryan Moore. McIlroy and Pieters never trailed against Johnson and Kuchar, handing them their first loss in four Ryder Cup matches.

The lone American point in the afternoon came from Brandt Snedeker and Brooks Koepka, who had no trouble against Kaymer and Danny Willett.

Willett had a little trouble with the crowd, especially when they lampooned him around Hazeltine with references to hot dogs and his brother, Pete, who had written a column in a British publication disparaging American galleries.

"It was anticipated," Willett said. "Coming to America is a tough one, just like when the Americans come to Europe. They gave me a little bit more. I think it was exactly what we thought it was going to be."

It wasn't just directed at Willett, however.

The crowd was loud and boisterous from the opening tee shot in misty conditions. There were a few rude comments, not unusual in America for a Ryder Cup. McIlroy had a 20-foot birdie putt to halve the morning foursomes match against Mickelson and Fowler when a fan from across 100 yards away shouted, "Get an American to putt it for you." That was a reference to McIlroy and Rose losing a playful $100 bet to an American fan who made a putt in Thursday's practice session.

Most striking was how quickly the crowd cheered bad shots for Europe. Typically, there is the slightest delay. Not on Friday. Sullivan, one of six rookies for Europe, hit his tee shot into the water on the 17th that put Europe 1 down and effectively ended the match. The crowd cheered before there was a ripple.

That's what inspired McIlroy in the final match of the day. He and Pieters were 2 up on the 16th hole, with Kuchar already in for a birdie, when the four-time major champion drained his 20-foot putt. Turning to the crowd, he bowed twice and screamed out, "C'mon!"

"I wanted to put an exclamation on that session for us," McIlroy said. "I thought about that celebration before I hit the putt."

More than a celebration, it was a message from McIlroy to what he felt was a hostile crowd.

"I'm not fazed by anything said by the crowd," McIlroy said. "And I'm not fazed by anything the U.S. throws at us."