Cutler and Cam: Whats wrong with these pictures?

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Cutler and Cam: Whats wrong with these pictures?

Cam Newton is struggling. Or is he?

The Carolina Panthers quarterbacks 84.5 passer rating from his epic rookie season of 2011 is down a little to 79.3. He threw 17 interceptions last season; he has thrown six in 2012, on pace for 19.

His completion percentage has dipped a little from 60 to 58.4.

His team is 1-5 and has lost four straight games. But the Panthers were 1-5 at this juncture of Newtons rookie season as well, although they never lost four in a row during the 6-10 season.

So what really is the problem with Cam Newton? The Bears arent quite seeing it, and if they are, theyre certainly not going to say.

I just think hes playing very well, said defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli. The guy is a weapon, and right now, were very concerned with him.

Newton may have simply set the bar too high with his rookie season of impact plays and games, like 543 yards and 29 points on the Chicago Bears. Dan Marino was in a Super Bowl his second season and since Newton broke some of Marinos and others rookie records, without the benefit of an offseason, the assumption that he would take not the next step but rather the next leap.

I understand Im not perfect, Newton said. Im striving to be great. What other people may think or what other people may criticize me on, I take it for what its worth but continue to try to make myself better each and every opportunity that I get.

Yet if Newton is struggling to the point of Hall of Famer Warren Moon crying racism at the decibel level of the criticism, what does that make Cutler?

Cutler is off his 2011 production in passer rating (85.7 to 78.3), completion percentage (58 to 56.7) and interception rate (2.2 to 3.7). He has thrown one more INT than Newton but three more TD passes.

The difference is pretty simple: Newtons Panthers have lost four straight for their 1-5. Cutlers Bears have won four straight for their 5-1.

Ironically, Newton is being ravaged for his pouty demeanor through times of trouble. Sound familiar?

The Bears have focused on film of last years near-miss against Carolina as well as current games. But what they see, apart from spot problems that have left the Panthers with that record, not that much has really changed with Newton himself.

Hes fast, hes big, hes got a strong arm, hes mobile in the pocket, said coach Lovie Smith. With that strong arm he can make all the throws and they do a good job letting him display all those talents. They have some option plays that normally are reserved for quarterbacks who can run.

Injury Report: Dexter Fowler close to return; Sox lose another while making debut

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Injury Report: Dexter Fowler close to return; Sox lose another while making debut

Each week, CSNChicago.com takes a look at the injury report from both the Cubs and White Sox, presented by Service King.

CUBS

Dexter Fowler (hamstring) is due to come off the disabled list early next week and the Cubs initially believed he may not even need a rehab stint, so he could make his return atop the Cubs lineup on the upcoming homestand. That is, however, if he's OK after getting drilled by a slugging toddler.

Jorge Soler (hamstring) traveled with the Cubs to New York and there is still no timetable for his return or when he would head out on a rehab assignment. He is participating in batting practice and has been seen taking some grounders in the field.

Tommy La Stella (hamstring) and Clayton Richard (finger) are both currently on rehab assignments with Triple-A Iowa and both guys could be back with the big-league club soon. However, the Cubs may leave Richard in the minors for a little while to figure out his struggles (7.30 in 22 games with Chicago).

WHITE SOX

The White Sox are having terrible luck with players making their debut this season.

Matt Davidson’s first game with the White Sox on Thursday started off great, recording an RBI-single in his second plate appearance. But it didn’t end well. Davidson suffered a broken right foot while rounding the bases trying to advance on a J.B. Shuck double. The White Sox recalled Carlos Sanchez on Friday to replace Davidson.

Melky Cabrera has missed a few games and will miss few more with a right wrist sprain. Cabrera left Saturday’s game after rolling his wrist diving for a fly ball, but X-rays came up negative.

Justin Morneau continues to progress from his elbow surgery he had back in December. If things go as planned, he could begin a rehab assignment next week. The White Sox veteran is traveling with the team this weekend to Houston and will re-evaluate at the end of the series.

Zach Putnam was placed on the 15-day disabled list on June 21 with ulnar neuritis in his right elbow. Putnam has a pair of options: surgery (two types) or rehab. The White Sox reliever is hoping to avoid any sort of surgery, which would effectively end his season. For now, Putnam will continue to rest his arm and let the inflammation decrease. He will travel with the team to Houston and could attempt to play catch soon.

Bears awarded QB Connor Shaw off waivers from Browns

Bears awarded QB Connor Shaw off waivers from Browns

The Bears have added another quarterback to the mix as they have been awarded Connor Shaw off waivers from the Cleveland Browns.

The 24-year-old Shaw was waived by the Browns on Thursday after spending the past two seasons with the team.

Shaw reunites with his former Browns quarterback coach in Dowell Loggains — now offensive coordinator of the Bears. Shaw was also teammates in Cleveland with current Bears backup quarterback Brian Hoyer.

Shaw was signed as an undrafted free agent out of South Carolina by the Browns in 2014. He's made just one career start in a 2014 Week 17 matchup against the Baltimore Ravens in which he went 14/28 for 177 yards and an interception.

Shaw spent all of 2015 on injured reserve with a broken thumb.

White Sox 'impressed' with rookie Tim Anderson's start

White Sox 'impressed' with rookie Tim Anderson's start

Aside from Todd Frazier’s desire for a more vocal presence on the field, Tim Anderson’s play has brought few complaints so far.

The White Sox top prospect has flashed ridiculous speed, good hands and a strong arm at shortstop, and his aggressive bat has already made an impact. What’s more, the organization is more than satisfied with the maturity displayed by the 2013 first-round pick and his desire to improve.

To say the least, Anderson is off to a good start with the White Sox, who open a three-game series at Houston on Friday night.

“I've been impressed with Timmy,” manager Robin Ventura said. “He's a very confident kid. He's quiet, but there's some confidence and some inner-drive. He's not a showboat guy. He just goes out and plays and he's a hard-nosed kid.”

Anderson is hitting .314/.322/.512 with 10 extra-base hits, five RBIs and two stolen bases in his first 19 games. He has multiple hits in 10 contests, which is the most by a White Sox rookie through 19 games since Gus Zernial in 1949. Anderson also has produced three Defensive Runs Saved and is 0.7 Wins Above Replacement in his short time in the majors.

It hasn’t all been easy.

He struck out twice with the bases loaded late in a one-run loss at the Boston Red Sox on June 23. He also endured a 1-for-12 span almost immediately after he was promoted to the majors. And he has struck out 28 times in 88 plate appearances, a rate of 31.1 percent.

But even when he struggles, teammates say Anderson’s mood — quiet, upbeat and determined — has stayed the same.

“With Timmy doing what he’s doing, it’s nice to watch,” third baseman Todd Frazier said. “I was telling Rick Renteria in the dugout, he doesn’t change one bit whether he’s bad or good. That’s the sign of a really great athlete.”

The ability to adapt has helped Anderson develop quickly.

[RELATED: Tim Anderson draws first walk of career]

One of the knocks on Anderson has always been that his tools are raw because he didn’t start to play until his junior year at Hillcrest High in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. With only four years of baseball experience when he was drafted, the White Sox expected to take their time with Anderson. Before this season, general manager Rick Hahn said Anderson might need all season at Triple-A Charlotte to refine his game.

But Anderson forced their hand.

“He's come a long way in the last couple years as far as just his instinctual stuff on the field and the inner timing of everything, that baseball clock in your mind,” Ventura said. “He's got it on spot.

“Just the ball off the bat, his reactions, his first step quickness. The first thing you really notice is how he moves. He's been great.”

Frazier agrees. He calls Anderson a catalyst at the top of the lineup as the White Sox have averaged 4.7 runs per game with him in the lineup. The team is 10-9 since Anderson arrived.

Frazier’s only point of contention with Anderson is in the field. But it’s all part of Frazier having fun with the rookie — “I bust his chops a lot,” he said.

“He doesn’t say much,” Frazier said. “I wish he would talk some more in the infield.

“Tell me if a guy’s stealing or not. Little things like that.”

Asked about Frazier’s ribbing on Thursday, Anderson started to smile. He recounted how the veteran informed him that the club planned to set aside the umpire, the pitcher and the ball for safe keeping after Anderson drew the first walk of his career.

Though he didn’t know what to expect at first, Anderson has started to find more comfort at the big league level. As for the on field-chatter with Frazier, that’s a work in progress.

“We are going to work on that,” Anderson said. “It’s coming.”