Fantasy baseball outfielder rankings

Fantasy baseball outfielder rankings

By David Ferris
CSNChicago.com

The following players qualify at outfielder in standard fantasy leagues. Rankings are based on a 5x5 scoring system (batting average, runs, home runs, RBIs, stolen bases).
                        
1. Mike Trout, Angels    
NOTE: No offense Miggy, but Trout's the MVP.
2. Ryan Braun, Brewers    
3. Andrew McCutchen, Pirates    
4. Josh Hamilton, Rangers    
5. Alex Rios, White Sox    
6. Adam Jones, Orioles    
7. Matt Holliday, Cardinals    
8. B.J. Upton, Rays    
NOTE: Team is done, but he's driving for next paycheck.
9. Jason Heyward, Braves    
10. Michael Bourn, Braves    
11. Curtis Granderson, Yankees    
NOTE: A three-category guy this year.
12. Austin Jackson, Tigers    
13. Angel Pagan, Giants    
NOTE: Most underrated player in baseball?
14. Allen Craig, Cardinals    
15. Josh Willingham, Twins    
16. Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins    
NOTE: Knees are tricky, but pop is ridiculous.
17. Jay Bruce, Reds    
18. Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics    
19. Matt Kemp, Dodgers    
20. Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies
NOTE: Might be done for year.     
21. Carlos Beltran, Cardinals    
22. Martin Prado, Braves    
23. Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers
NOTE: Not as much fun from up close.     
24. Norichika Aoki, Brewers    
25. Justin Upton, Diamondbacks    
NOTE: Has the thumb been right all year?
26. Alex Gordon, Royals    
27. Carlos Gomez, Brewers    
28. Corey Hart, Brewers    
29. Alfonso Soriano, Cubs    
NOTE: Much better season than many realize.
30. Ben Zobrist, Rays    
31. Nelson Cruz, Rangers    
32. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians    
33. Josh Reddick, Athletics    
NOTE: Average cratering in second half.
34. Andre Ethier, Dodgers    
35. Torii Hunter, Angels    
36. Hunter Pence, Giants    
37. Ichiro Suzuki, Yankees    
38. Desmond Jennings, Rays    
39. Alejandro De Aza, White Sox    
NOTE: Underrated spark to their offense.
40. Shane Victorino, Dodgers    
41. Bryce Harper, Nationals    
42. Jason Kubel, Diamondbacks    
43. Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox    
44. Juan Pierre, Phillies    
45. David Murphy, Rangers    
46. Coco Crisp, Athletics    
47. Dexter Fowler, Rockies    
48. Garrett Jones, Pirates    
49. Ryan Ludwick, Reds    
50. Ben Revere, Twins    
51. Cody Ross, Red Sox    
NOTE: Perfect swing for Fenway.
52. Justin Ruggiano, Marlins    
53. Jon Jay, Cardinals    
NOTE: Defense needed; they're weak on corner.
54. DeWayne Wise, White Sox    
55. Nate McLouth, Orioles    
NOTE: Don't laugh, Buck trusts him.
56. Mark Trumbo, Angels    
NOTE: Bad habits back in second half.
57. Nick Swisher, Yankees    
58. Jayson Werth, Nationals
NOTE: No pop yet, but average is nice.     
59. Tyler Colvin, Rockies    
60. Drew Stubbs, Reds    
NOTE: Trouble with the slider.
61. Michael Brantley, Indians    
62. Howie Kendrick, Angels    
63. Will Venable, Padres    
64. Dayan Viciedo, White Sox    
65. Jonny Gomes, Athletics    
66. John Mayberry, Phillies
NOTE: Cashing in late on pedigree.    
67. Rajai Davis, Blue Jays    
NOTE: A speed play, that's it.
68. Michael Saunders, Mariners    
69. Denard Span, Twins    
70. Carlos Lee, Marlins    
NOTE: Makes contact but zero pop.
71. Brandon Belt, Giants    
72. Matt Joyce, Rays    
73. Justin Maxwell, Astros    
NOTE: An underrated, ownable Astro.
74. Brandon Moss, Athletics    
75. Cameron Maybin, Padres    
76. Delmon Young, Tigers    
77. Colby Rasmus, Blue Jays    
NOTE: Is the grow-up season ever coming?
78. Trevor Plouffe, Twins    
79. Seth Smith, Athletics    
80. Michael Morse, Nationals    
81. Chris Denorfia, Padres
NOTE: A terrific play against lefties.     
82. Yonder Alonso, Padres    
83. Mitch Moreland, Rangers    
84. Jarrod Dyson, Royals    
85. Jeff Francoeur, Royals    
NOTE: At least you're not paying him.
86. Scott Hairston, Mets    
87. David DeJesus, Cubs    
88. Gregor Blanco, Giants    
89. Gerardo Parra, Diamondbacks    
90. Brennan Boesch, Tigers    
91. Roger Bernadina, Nationals    
92. Jesus Guzman, Padres    
93. Tyler Greene, Astros    
94. Donovan Solano, Marlins    
NOTE: Utility grab, will run freely.
95. Tony Campana, Cubs    
96. Darin Mastroianni, Twins    
97. Steve Lombardozzi, Nationals    
98. Ty Wigginton, Phillies  

White Sox LHP Carlos Rodon ‘back on track’ after rehab start Monday

White Sox LHP Carlos Rodon ‘back on track’ after rehab start Monday

Carlos Rodon threw 58 pitches in a rehab start for Triple-A Charlotte on Monday and is optimistic he’ll return to the White Sox starting rotation soon. 

The 23-year-old left-hander was placed on the 15-day disabled list July 9 (retroactive to July 6) with a sprained left wrist, a bizarre injury he suffered when he slipped coming out of the White Sox dugout at U.S. Cellular Field before a game July 8 against the Atlanta Braves. He threw 3 2/3 innings yesterday in Louisville against the Cincinnati Reds’ Triple-A affiliate, allowing three runs (two earned) on five hits with two walks, three strikeouts and one home run.

More important than the results to Rodon, though, was how he felt in his first game in nearly three weeks. 

“I felt good,” Rodon said. “Back on track.”

The plan for Rodon is to throw again with the White Sox before returning to the team’s rotation, though. Manager Robin Ventura didn’t set a timetable but said the 2014 No. 3 overall pick is “headed in the right direction.”

[MORE: Suspended Chris Sale will start Thursday against Cubs]

The N.C. State product hit the disabled list earlier this month with a 4.50 ERA, 4.42 FIP and 91 strikeouts, 32 walks and 15 home runs over 92 innings. Once he returns, he’ll hope to hit the reset button on what’s been an up-and-down second year in the major leagues. 

Rodon said his goal was to throw 60 pitches on Monday, so he was only two pitches off from that mark. And when he returned to U.S. Cellular Field Tuesday, he remained encouraged with his recovery process. 

“Everything responded well,” Rodon said. “Just looking forward to this next start here.”

John Fox, Bears coaches balancing workload with injury risk as training camp convenes

John Fox, Bears coaches balancing workload with injury risk as training camp convenes

Bears players and coaches have been preparing for 2016 intermittently for the past several months. That said, the 2016 “season” effectively begins on Thursday with the Bears holding their first practice of training camp, one that will be open to the public even though players will work the first two days without pads.

From now until early next year, the Bears will have no more than one day off at a time, save the off-week leading up to no game on Nov. 6, and other than perhaps a bonus day off here and there, such as after the Thursday, Oct. 20 night game at Green Bay, after which coach John Fox may grant his team a couple added days off, depending on the performance in Green Bay.

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

Pads come on for the first time since last Jan. 3 against the Detroit Lions as of Saturday’s practice. Thus begins the ongoing balancing act for coaches to maximize the amount of productive time within the parameters allowed under the collective bargaining agreement, all in the context of heat and conditions of contact.

“You’ve got to get your team ready for battle and you’ve got to make sure you’ve got guys ready to go to battle with,” Fox said. “So it’s a fine line, getting ready for football.”

The Bears already have had offseason injuries to guard Ted Larsen and wide receiver Marquess Wilson, in addition to a strained hamstring for rookie running back Jordan Howard and veterans like Pernell McPhee (knee) coming off surgery.

“It’s a combative game and injuries are part of it,” Fox said. “You’ve got to have some good fortune, and some good practice habits. That way you’re getting better and more physical, yet not to the point where you’re losing guys. Obviously with the reduction of our offseason and the things we used to do as coaches, I don’t think doing less of that is the right idea.”

[RELATED: Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips]

Training camp this year includes one of the shortest off-site stretches ever, with 10 sessions at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais and one at Soldier Field on Sat. Aug. 6.

Day, Date, Practice Time (CT)

Wednesday, July 27: Report day

Thursday, July 28: 9:35 a.m. practice (no pads)

Friday, July 29: 11:15 a.m. practice (no pads)

Saturday, July 30: 9:35 a.m. practice

Sunday, July 31: 11:15 a.m. practice

AUGUST

Day, Date, Practice Time (CT)

Monday, Aug. 1: 9:35 a.m. practice

Tuesday, Aug. 2: Off day

Wednesday, Aug. 3: 11:15 a.m. practice

Thursday, Aug. 4: 9:35 a.m. practice

Friday, Aug. 5: 11:15 a.m. practice

Saturday, Aug. 6: 12:30 p.m. Meijer Chicago Bears Family Fest (Soldier Field)

Sunday, Aug.7: Off day

Monday, Aug. 8: 11:15 a.m. practice

Tuesday, Aug. 9: 9:35 a.m. practice/final open practice

Wednesday, Aug. 10: Off day

Preseason Schedule:

Thursday, Aug. 11: Bears vs. Denver Broncos, 7 p.m.

Thursday,  Aug. 18: Bears at New England Patriots, 7 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 27: Bears vs. Kansas City Chiefs, 12 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 1: Bears at Cleveland Browns, 7 p.m.

Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips

Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips

After covering some 25 Bears training camps spanning both Bourbonnais and Platteville, this CSNChicago.com reporter has gleaned some tips for getting the most out of the fan experience:

Appreciate the effort:

A lot of the young men you’ll be watching are living playing to realize a dream they’ve had since they were as young as some of the youngest fans. They are competing for jobs every day, every snap, and even going against teammates, the effort expended is worthy of the utmost respect. A guarantee: You WILL see something spectacular, whether from a star or some young hopeful who will leave it all and then some on that practice field. Enjoy the moment.

Be polite:

If you want autographs from players, your chances improve with a little courtesy. “Hey, Cutler…” and waving a pen and program at the Bears quarterback does not play nearly as well as “Jay, Jay…” or, if you’re a young fan and really want to stand out, “Mr. Cutler, Mr. Cutler…” Players don’t always get to hear a lot of “polite.” It doesn’t guarantee a signing, but understand that there’s no way players can sign every request and still have fully functioning limbs. And if a player doesn’t stop to sign, it’s not a snub. Most players sign every other day, so this just might be their off day for signing.

Plus, if it’s post-practice, remember that these players have just gone through at least two hours of beyond-max-effort work, wearing equipment that is anything but air-conditioned and weighs as much as a small child, and getting off their feet is a necessary survival skill.

[SHOP: Buy a Jay Cutler jersey here]

Go early:

The folks at Olivet Nazarene University do a truly amazing job of crowd and traffic control, but depending on the size of the crush, particularly on peak days, you may miss some field time getting into the parking lots if you’re getting there close to the start of practice. For another thing, players are typically on the field well ahead of the scheduled start times for practice, so you’ll be seeing players working and getting loosened up if you’re there early.

Understand the cadence and order:

Practices are not continuous scrimmaging and hitting. For one thing, that’s physically not possible, or smart. The Bears have individual sessions, then depending on the day, may come together for a “live” run scrimmage without receivers, followed by a less intense session, maybe some special teams, before or after very live pass-protection and receiver-DB head-to-heads, a break, then finishing with 11-on-11 “team” sessions.