Fantasy Baseball Outfielder Ranks - 921

Fantasy Baseball Outfielder Ranks - 921

By David Ferris Contributor

The following players qualify at outfielder in standard fantasy leagues. Rankings are based on a 5x5 scoring system (batting average, runs, home runs, RBIs, stolen bases).
1. Mike Trout, Angels     NOTE: No offense Miggy, but Trout's the MVP.
2. Ryan Braun, Brewers     
3. Andrew McCutchen, Pirates     
4. Josh Hamilton, Rangers     
5. Alex Rios, White Sox     
6. Adam Jones, Orioles     
7. Matt Holliday, Cardinals     
8. B.J. Upton, Rays     NOTE: Team is done, but he's driving for next paycheck.
9. Jason Heyward, Braves     
10. Michael Bourn, Braves     
11. Curtis Granderson, Yankees     NOTE: A three-category guy this year.
12. Austin Jackson, Tigers     
13. Angel Pagan, Giants     NOTE: Most underrated player in baseball?
14. Allen Craig, Cardinals     
15. Josh Willingham, Twins     
16. Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins     NOTE: Knees are tricky, but pop is ridiculous.
17. Jay Bruce, Reds     
18. Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics     
19. Matt Kemp, Dodgers     
20. Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies    NOTE: Might be done for year.      
21. Carlos Beltran, Cardinals     
22. Martin Prado, Braves     
23. Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers    NOTE: Not as much fun from up close.      
24. Norichika Aoki, Brewers     
25. Justin Upton, Diamondbacks     NOTE: Has the thumb been right all year?

26. Alex Gordon, Royals     
27. Carlos Gomez, Brewers     
28. Corey Hart, Brewers     
29. Alfonso Soriano, Cubs     NOTE: Much better season than many realize.
30. Ben Zobrist, Rays     
31. Nelson Cruz, Rangers     
32. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians     
33. Josh Reddick, Athletics     NOTE: Average cratering in second half.
34. Andre Ethier, Dodgers     
35. Torii Hunter, Angels     
36. Hunter Pence, Giants     
37. Ichiro Suzuki, Yankees     
38. Desmond Jennings, Rays     
39. Alejandro De Aza, White Sox     NOTE: Underrated spark to their offense.
40. Shane Victorino, Dodgers     
41. Bryce Harper, Nationals     
42. Jason Kubel, Diamondbacks     
43. Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox     
44. Juan Pierre, Phillies     
45. David Murphy, Rangers     
46. Coco Crisp, Athletics     
47. Dexter Fowler, Rockies     
48. Garrett Jones, Pirates     
49. Ryan Ludwick, Reds     
50. Ben Revere, Twins     
51. Cody Ross, Red Sox     NOTE: Perfect swing for Fenway.
52. Justin Ruggiano, Marlins     
53. Jon Jay, Cardinals     NOTE: Defense needed; they're weak on corner.
54. DeWayne Wise, White Sox     
55. Nate McLouth, Orioles     NOTE: Don't laugh, Buck trusts him.
56. Mark Trumbo, Angels     NOTE: Bad habits back in second half.
57. Nick Swisher, Yankees     
58. Jayson Werth, Nationals    NOTE: No pop yet, but average is nice.      
59. Tyler Colvin, Rockies     
60. Drew Stubbs, Reds     NOTE: Trouble with the slider.
61. Michael Brantley, Indians     
62. Howie Kendrick, Angels     
63. Will Venable, Padres     
64. Dayan Viciedo, White Sox     
65. Jonny Gomes, Athletics     
66. John Mayberry, Phillies     NOTE: Cashing in late on pedigree.     
67. Rajai Davis, Blue Jays     NOTE: A speed play, that's it.
68. Michael Saunders, Mariners     
69. Denard Span, Twins     
70. Carlos Lee, Marlins     NOTE: Makes contact but zero pop.
71. Brandon Belt, Giants     
72. Matt Joyce, Rays     
73. Justin Maxwell, Astros     NOTE: An underrated, ownable Astro.
74. Brandon Moss, Athletics     
75. Cameron Maybin, Padres     
76. Delmon Young, Tigers     
77. Colby Rasmus, Blue Jays     NOTE: Is the grow-up season ever coming?
78. Trevor Plouffe, Twins     
79. Seth Smith, Athletics     
80. Michael Morse, Nationals     
81. Chris Denorfia, Padres    NOTE: A terrific play against lefties.      
82. Yonder Alonso, Padres     
83. Mitch Moreland, Rangers     
84. Jarrod Dyson, Royals     
85. Jeff Francoeur, Royals     NOTE: At least you're not paying him.
86. Scott Hairston, Mets     
87. David DeJesus, Cubs     
88. Gregor Blanco, Giants     
89. Gerardo Parra, Diamondbacks     
90. Brennan Boesch, Tigers     
91. Roger Bernadina, Nationals     
92. Jesus Guzman, Padres     
93. Tyler Greene, Astros     
94. Donovan Solano, Marlins     NOTE: Utility grab, will run freely.
95. Tony Campana, Cubs     
96. Darin Mastroianni, Twins     
97. Steve Lombardozzi, Nationals     
98. Ty Wigginton, Phillies     

Kyle Hendricks outduels Clayton Kershaw and delivers legendary performance that puts Cubs in World Series

Kyle Hendricks outduels Clayton Kershaw and delivers legendary performance that puts Cubs in World Series

John Hendricks sent a text message to his son at 11:24 a.m. on Saturday: “Good luck tonight!! Remember, great mechanics and preparation will prevail. Just let it go!!” It ended with three emoji: a smiley face with sunglasses, the thumbs-up sign and a flexed biceps.

The Cubs have bonded fathers and sons for generations, and Hendricks immediately understood what it meant for his boy when the Cubs traded Ryan Dempster to the Texas Rangers minutes before the deadline on July 31, 2012, telling Kyle: “You win in this city, you will be a legend. There is no doubt about it. This is the greatest sports town in the United States.”

This is the intoxicating lure of the Cubs. It didn’t matter that Kyle had been an eighth-round pick out of Dartmouth College, and hadn’t yet finished his first full season in professional baseball, and would be joining an organization enduring a 101-loss season, the third of five straight fifth-place finishes.

Kyle’s low-key personality will never get him confused with an ’85 Bear, but he delivered a legendary performance in Game 6, outpitching Clayton Kershaw at the end of this National League Championship Series and leading the Cubs to the World Series for the first time in 71 years.

Five outs away from the pennant, a raucous crowd of 42,386 at Wrigley Field actually booed star manager Joe Maddon when he walked out to the mound to take the ball from Kyle and bring in closer Aroldis Chapman. Kyle, the silent assassin, did briefly raise his hand to acknowledge the standing ovation before descending the dugout steps. 

After a 5-0 win, Kyle stood in roughly the same spot with Nike goggles on his head and finally looked a little rattled, his body shivering and teeth chattering in the cold, his Cubs gear soaked from the champagne-and-beer celebration.

“It’s always been an uphill climb for me, honestly,” Kyle said. “But that really has nothing to do with getting guys out. My focus from Day 1 – even when I was young, high school, college, all the way up until now – all it’s been is trying to make good pitches. 

“And as we moved up, you just saw that good pitches get good hitters out.” 

At a time when the game is obsessed with velocity and showing off for the radar gun, Kyle knows how to pitch, putting the ball where he wants when he wants, avoiding the hot zones that lead to trouble, mixing his changeups, fastballs and curveball in an unpredictable way that takes advantage of the team’s intricate scouting system and keeps hitters completely off-balance.

“Kyle didn’t even give them any air or any hope,” general manager Jed Hoyer said.

Amid the celebration, scouting/player-development chief Jason McLeod spotted Kyle’s dad and yelled at John: “You f------ called it!” John – who once worked in the Angels ticket office and as a golf pro in Southern California – had moved to Chicago two years ago to work for his good friend’s limo company and watch his son pitch at Wrigley Field. John had told McLeod that Kyle would one day help the Cubs win a championship.

“That was one of the best pitching performances I’ve ever seen,” McLeod said. “Ever.”

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities] 

The media framed Kyle as The Other Pitcher, even though he won the ERA title this season, with all the pregame buzz surrounding Kershaw, the three-time Cy Young Award winner and 2014 NL MVP. Except Kershaw gave up five runs and got knocked out after five innings, while Kyle only gave up two singles to the 23 batters he faced, finishing with six strikeouts against zero walks and looking like he had even more left in the tank at 88 pitches.

“It was incredible,” Ben Zobrist said. “That was the easiest postseason game we’ve had yet and it was the clincher to go to the World Series. 

“He’s just so good, so mature for his age. He just has a knack to put the ball where he needs to. He’s smart and he’s clutch. He deserves to win the Cy Young this year.”

Where Kershaw’s presence loomed over the entire playoffs, Kyle has always been underestimated, coming into this season as a fourth or fifth starter with something to prove, and even he didn’t see all this coming. But big-game pitchers can come in all shapes and sizes and don’t have to throw 97 mph. 

“He wants the ball,” John said. “Every big game – I don’t care if it was Little League or wherever – he wants the ball. Plain and simple, (he’ll) get the job done.”

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