Fantasy baseball OF ranks

Fantasy baseball OF ranks

The following players qualify at outfielder in standard Yahoo! leagues. Rankings are based on a 5x5 scoring system (batting average, runs, home runs, RBIs, stolen bases).

1. Ryan Braun, Brewers
2. Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies
3. Josh Hamilton, Rangers
4. Mike Trout, Angels
NOTE: The AL's best player over last month.
5. Andrew McCutchen, Pirates
6. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays
7. Curtis Granderson, Yankees
8. Matt Kemp, Dodgers
NOTE: Doubtful we'll see the bags this year.
9. Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins
10. Nelson Cruz, Rangers
11. Adam Jones, Orioles
12. Carlos Beltran, Cardinals
13. Melky Cabrera, Giants
NOTE: Line-drive spike and contact rate back him up.
14. Mark Trumbo, Angels
15. Hunter Pence, Phillies
16. Matt Holliday, Cardinals
17. Bryce Harper, Nationals
18. Allen Craig, Cardinals
NOTE: A superstar waiting to happen, just needs to be healthy.
19. Adrian Gonzalez, Red Sox
20. Jay Bruce, Reds
NOTE: Heavy slumps come with strikeouts and fly balls.
21. Andre Ethier, Dodgers
22. Corey Hart, Brewers
23. Josh Reddick, Athletics
24. Justin Upton, Diamondbacks
NOTE: Is the thumb still bothering him?
25. Michael Bourn, Braves
NOTE: Power came out of nowhere.
26. Michael Cuddyer, Rockies
27. Shane Victorino, Phillies
28. B.J. Upton, Rays
NOTE: Playing for his next big contract.
29. Jason Heyward, Braves
30. Shin-Soo Choo, Indians
31. Nick Swisher, Yankees
32. Ben Zobrist, Rays
NOTE: Signs of life in last week.
33. Martin Prado, Braves
34. Angel Pagan, Giants
35. Dexter Fowler, Rockies
NOTE: Unreal at home, struggles at sea level.
36. Josh Willingham, Twins
37. Desmond Jennings, Rays
38. Alejandro De Aza, White Sox
39. Alex Rios, White Sox
40. Carlos Quentin, Padres
NOTE: Already showing up in trade talks.
41. Dayan Viciedo, White Sox
NOTE: Hacks first, asks questions later.
42. Colby Rasmus, Blue Jays
43. Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners
44. Austin Jackson, TigersNOTE: Mostly, they miss his sublime defense.
45. Matt Joyce, Rays
46. Cameron Maybin, Padres
NOTE: An excellent buy-low candidate.
47. Howie Kendrick, Angels
48. Kendrys Morales, Angels
49. Alfonso Soriano, Cubs
NOTE: On power binge, should get moved to contender.
50. Lucas Duda, Mets
51. Alex Gordon, Royals
52. Jeff Francoeur, Royals
53. Michael Morse, Nationals
54. Jason Kubel, Diamondbacks
55. Rajai Davis, Blue Jays
NOTE: He'll run whenever possible.
56. Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox
NOTE: Hoping for July return.
57. Drew Stubbs, Reds
58. Torii Hunter, Angels
59. Emilio Bonifacio, Marlins
60. Bryan LaHair, Cubs
61. Trevor Plouffe, Twins
NOTE: Average risk, but power seems legit.
62. Michael Brantley, Indians
63. Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics
64. Mitch Moreland, Rangers
65. Brennan Boesch, Tigers
NOTE: Back in No. 2 slot, swinging well.
66. Carl Crawford, Red Sox
67. Michael Saunders, Mariners
68. Seth Smith, Athletics
NOTE: Needed on a corner with others nicked.
69. Carlos Lee, Astros
70. Logan Morrison, Marlins
71. Ben Revere, Twins
NOTE: A three-category man, but no pop.
72. Gregor Blanco, Giants
73. Ty Wigginton, Phillies
74. David Murphy, Rangers
NOTE: Have some fun in Arlington.
75. Lance Berkman, Cardinals
76. Raul Ibanez, Yankees
77. Coco Crisp, Athletics
78. Yonder Alonso, Padres
NOTE: Line-drive machine, no power.
79. Kirk Nieuwenhuis, Mets
80. Norichika Aoki, Brewers
81. Alex Presley, Pirates
NOTE: Category juice in the leadoff spot.
82. Scott Hairston, Mets
83. Ryan Ludwick, Reds
84. Jon Jay, Cardinals
NOTE: Badly needed back in center.
85. Luke Scott, Rays
86. Jordan Schafer, Astros
87. Delmon Young, Tigers
88. Jose Tabata, Pirates
89. Denard Span, Twins
90. Vernon Wells, Angels
91. Juan Pierre, Phillies
92. Nyjer Morgan, Brewers
93. Jason Bay, Mets
NOTE: Should they just let Hairston take over?
94. Brett Gardner, Yankees
95. Gerardo Parra, Diamondbacks
96. Andy Dirks, Tigers
97. Daniel Nava, Red Sox
98. Tony Campana, Cubs
NOTE: Speed demon, not much else here.
99. Jerry Hairston Jr., Dodgers
100. Bobby Abreu, Dodgers

The last White Sox rebuild: Bobby Howry remembers aftermath of '97 'White Flag' trade

The last White Sox rebuild: Bobby Howry remembers aftermath of '97 'White Flag' trade

Bobby Howry wasn't aware of the fact he was part of one of the more infamous transactions in White Sox history until a few years after it happened. 

In 1997, with the White Sox only 3 1/2 games behind the division-leading Cleveland Indians, general manager Ron Schueler pulled the trigger on a massive trade that left many around Chicago — including some in the White Sox clubhouse — scratching their heads. Heading to the San Francisco Giants was the team's best starting pitcher (left-hander Wilson Alvarez), a reliable rotation piece (Doug Drabek) and a closer coming off a 1996 All-Star appearance (Roberto Hernandez). In return, the White Sox acquired six minor leaguers: right-handers Howry, Lorenzo Barcelo, Keith Foulke, left-hander Ken Vining, shortstop Mike Caruso and outfielder Brian Manning. Only Foulke had major league experience, and it wasn't exactly good (an 8.26 ERA in 44 2/3 innings). 

Howry was largely oblivious to the shocking nature of the trade that brought him from the Giants to White Sox until, before the 1999 season, he was featured in a commercial that referenced the "White Flag trade."

"I don't even know if I knew it was called that before then," Howry recalled last weekend at the Sheraton Grand Chicago at Cubs Convention. 

The trade was a stark signal that youth would be emphasized on 35th and Shields. Both Alvarez and Hernandez were set to become free agents after the 1997 season, and the 40-year-old Darwin wasn't a long-term piece, either. With youngsters like Magglio Ordonez and Carlos Lee rising through the farm system, the move was made with an eye on the future and maximizing the return on players who weren't going to be long-term pieces. 

Sound familiar? 

It's hardly a perfect comparison, but when the White Sox traded Chris Sale to the Boston Red Sox in December for four minor leaguers — headlined by top-100 prospects in Yoan Moncada and Michael Kopech — it was the first rebuilding blockbuster trade the organization had made since the 1997 White Flag deal. Shortly after trading their staff ace at the 2016 Winter Meetings, the White Sox shipped Adam Eaton — their best position player — to the Washington Nationals for a package of prospects featuring two more highly-regarded youngsters in Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez. 

[SHOP WHITE SOX: Get your White Sox gear right here]

And there still could be more moves on the horizon, too, for Rick Hahn's White Sox (Jose Quintana has been the subject of persistent rumors since the Winter Meetings). But for those looking for an optimistic outlook of the White Sox rebuilding plans, it's worth noting that the club's last youth movement, to an extent, was successful.

Only Howry (3.74 ERA over 294 games) and Foulke (2.87 ERA, 100 saves over 346 games) became significant long-term pieces for the White Sox from those six players brought over in 1997. And it wasn't like Schueler dealt away any of the franchise's cornerstones — like Frank Thomas, Albert Belle and Robin Ventura — but with future starters in Lee, Ordonez and Chris Singleton on their way the White Sox were able to go young. A swap of promising youthful players (Mike Cameron for Paul Konerko) proved to be successful a year and a half later. 

And with a couple of shrewd moves — namely, dealing Jamie Navarro and John Snyder to the Milwaukee Brewers for Cal Eldred and Jose Valentin — the "Kids Can Play" White Sox stormed to an American League Central title in 2000. 

"It was great," Howry said of developing with so many young players in the late 1999's and 2000. "You come in and you feel a lot more comfortable when you got a lot of young guys and you're all coming up together and building together. It's not like you're walking into a primarily veteran clubhouse where you're kind of having to duck and hide all the time. We had a great group of guys and we built together over a couple of years, and putting that together was a lot of fun."

What sparked things in 2000, Howry said, was that ferocious brawl with the Detroit Tigers on April 22 in which 11 players were ejected (the fight left Foulke needing five stitches and former Tigers catcher/first baseman Robert Fick doused in beer). 

"About the time we had that fight with Detroit, that big brawl, all of a sudden after then we just seemed to kind of come together and everything started to click and it took off," Howry said. 

The White Sox went 80-81 in 1998 and slipped to 75-86 in 1999, but their 95-67 record in 2000 was the best in the league — though it only amounted to a three-game sweep at the hands of the wild-card winning Seattle Mariners. 

Still, the White Flag trade had a happy ending two and a half years later. While with the White Sox, Howry didn't feel pressure to perform under the circumstances with which he arrived, which probably helped those young players grow together into eventual division champions. 

"I was 23 years old," Howry said. "At 23 years old, I didn't really — I was just like, okay, I'm still playing, I got a place to play. I didn't really put a whole lot of thought into three veteran guys for six minor leaguers." 

White Sox Talk Podcast: Zack Collins discusses staying at catcher

White Sox Talk Podcast: Zack Collins discusses staying at catcher

White Sox 2016 first round pick Zack Collins joins the podcast to talk about his future with the White Sox, when he hopes to make the big leagues and the doubters who question whether he can be a major league catcher.   He discusses comparisons with Kyle Schwarber, his impressions of Yoan Moncada and Michael Kopech, why his dad took him to a Linkin Park concert when he was 6 years old and much more.