Knicks' Derrick Rose on rape case: 'I feel like I didn't do anything wrong'

Knicks' Derrick Rose on rape case: 'I feel like I didn't do anything wrong'

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Derrick Rose said Monday he isn't worried about a rape trial set to start next week because he feels he "didn't do anything wrong."

Rose said he is instead focused on his first season with the New York Knicks. His first practice with the team will be Tuesday.

"My concern is just playing well this year," Rose said. "I can't think about the case. I feel like I'm innocent and I feel like I didn't do anything wrong, like I said, and I can't let that distract me with the year that I have ahead of me."

A woman sued Rose last year in California, contending the former MVP and two of his friends raped her in August 2013 while she was incapacitated after a night of drinking. Rose and the others say they had consensual sex with her that night.

The civil trial is scheduled to begin Oct. 4 - barring any settlement - the day the Knicks play their exhibition opener in Houston. It's unclear how much, if any, of the preseason he would have to miss if there is a trial.

"I'm not worried about it, but if I do have to miss time, it's a part of it," Rose said. "Of course I don't want to be in this position, but it is what it is and I'm going to let my lawyers and my team handle it."

Rose added that he hadn't heard anything about a possibility of criminal charges being brought.

The Knicks acquired Rose from Chicago in June. The point guard said he is healthy after a series of injuries, mostly to his knees, that have plagued him since his MVP season in 2011.

Because of the injuries, Rose hasn't played in more than 66 games a season since he first tore his ACL in the 2012 playoffs. Rehab has forced him to report early or stay late after practices and games for much of the last few years, which he said was tiresome.

But he was able to focus on basketball this summer while adding yoga to his workout routine, and Knicks who have been playing with him say Rose's quickness has returned.

"He's extremely focused right now," All-Star Carmelo Anthony said, adding that he's never played with a point guard with Rose's explosiveness. "He's healthy, he has a different mindset. He has a clear mind and he's ready to go out there and try to help us with our goals."

Rose was the biggest addition to a Knicks team that also signed his former Bulls teammate, Joakim Noah, and veteran guards Courtney Lee and Brandon Jennings. If he remains healthy, Rose can get the Knicks playing at a quicker pace and create easier baskets under new coach Jeff Hornacek, after their offense often stalled while playing the triangle under Derek Fisher and Kurt Rambis the last two years.

Lee said Rose, who once hit a game-winning shot over him while Lee played for Houston, has looked confident during offseason workouts.

"He kind of reminded me of that MVP D-Rose, especially in some of the drills that we were doing," Lee said. "He was able to get to his spots quick, explosiveness and knock down shots."

Rose averaged 16.4 points in 66 games last season, and most of the games he missed were unrelated to his knees. The Chicago native has been focused on learning a new city and team, traveling with a group of Knicks players to practice in Puerto Rico at Anthony's invitation.

Having to miss time in October would delay his ability to get comfortable. A settlement would prevent that, but Rose didn't discuss that possibility, praising his legal team for taking care of the details.

"They're handling everything and they're giving me time to focus on what I need to focus on and that's just straight basketball," Rose said.

Kyle Hendricks helps transform Cubs into 100-win team

Kyle Hendricks helps transform Cubs into 100-win team

PITTSBURGH – The Cubs have gone from the happy-to-be-here team that crashed last year’s playoff party to a 100-win machine that’s expected to win the World Series or else be remembered as underachievers.  

The evolution of Kyle Hendricks from a fifth starter to a legitimate Cy Young Award candidate helps explain why the Cubs have lived up to the preseason hype and created such expectations for October.

The Cubs won’t be leaving their season up to the coin flip of a wild-card game, the way they did 355 days ago at PNC Park, where it almost looks like the Pittsburgh Pirates still haven’t recovered yet. What once appeared to be a circle-your-calendar showdown that could decide the National League Central is now glorified spring training for the Cubs in late September.   

[SHOP: Gear up, Cubs fans!]

Hendricks didn’t have to silence the blackout atmosphere during Monday night’s 12-2 win in front of an announced crowd of 20,519 and sections of empty seats. A quiet, polite Dartmouth College graduate would never troll Pittsburgh fans on Twitter the way Jake Arrieta did last year. But the Cubs are witnessing another historic run that could catapult them through October.  

Hendricks (16-8) lowered his major-league-leading ERA to 1.99 with six scoreless innings against the Pirates (77-79). The Cubs reached 100 wins for the first time since 1935 and that sense of momentum always begins with starting pitching. Hendricks has allowed three earned runs or fewer in each of his last 22 starts.  

“Obviously, we did not anticipate all of this,” manager Joe Maddon said. “He’s really exceeded, and good for him. This is something I think he can carry on for years. This is by no means a fluke. It’s not an anomaly. This is how good he’s capable of being. So it’s made a big difference that he’s been able to do what he’s done this year. No question.”