Follow the money

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Follow the money

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

The big story this week was the unprecedented penalties handed down by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell in the New Orleans bounty scandal. Wow. That got everybodys attention. I think most of the folks I talked to thought the penalty was a bit much, but thanked god it wasnt their team, especially since we all know that this is not an isolated incident. I have no doubt that Goodell had to act in this way since it became public. At that point the Saints did this to themselves. I find it interesting that it was noted that this investigation had been going on for years. The troubling part is that this did not deter Gregg Williams and the Saints from curtailing the practice. Again, I believe it was because these incentives were so much part of the tough-guy culture and existed for so long that those involved did not see the harm, pardon the pun. Much like Martha Stewart, the lying when confronted only increased the penalty. And also like a gun-toting-in-the-sweatpants-at-a-nightclub wide receiver and a delusional, hair-dyed, Howdy-Doody look-alike ex-governor, examples must be made of. Theres nothing like a very public flogging to keep the masses in check.

Now as I said here last week, I think some of this is over-blown in the fact that this is portrayed as players repeatedly taking wild-eyed head-shots and tackling at knee level only. The game moves too fast for that. Wouldnt an obsessed media notice? Are the Saints penalty numbers far above the rest of the league? But core aggression, achieved by almost any means, is always going at the heart of a game of violence. Stuff is going to happen. The players understand the world of mayhem in which they exist. Bounty or not, a hit that knocks someone out is going to get notice: From players. From coaches. From fans. And, lets not forget, be shown repeatedly, around the clock on ESPN and the NFL NETWORK! If it bleeds it leads!

Now call me cynical, but Im wondering in what different ways the NFL could benefit from this. During the past year, concussion issues in sports have been discussed more than any time ever. Goodell has been out front on this, touting a concern for player safety. But is he exactly the right guy to be doing this? After all, hes in charge of a business that is built on violence and high-speed collisions. Can a cattle farmer be an animal rights activist? Also since hes in charge, he must be aware of the 39 lawsuits from over 850 former players over concussions. I would think those lawsuits stand a chance against a league that used to sell biggest hits videos on their own website. Wouldnt a good preemptive strike against damages be to show that your on and off-field business model had changed? (Or is it an admission of guilt?)

Culture change doesnt come easy, and I commend Goodell for at least trying to move the bar to a more palatable place. But, with the money that is involved Im finding it hard to believe that all of his motives are altruistic. Then again, if he really is the savior, he can purify the sport by dealing with the real elephant in the room: The fact that the NFL is the most popular sport in this country because its the easiest to gamble on.

Im thinking if there was going to be a how-not-to book written on how to negotiate a player contract, it should be done by Matt Fortes agent. Lost in the woods is always my first thought when I hear the latest update of his contract saga. Forte is not in a position of strength, usually the determining factor in a negotiation, but he and his team dont seem to understand this. I know that this must be very frustrating for him, but what can he do? What he shouldnt do is send out woe is me tweets lamenting the fact that the Bears signed another running back. Honestly?Theres no crying in football! Michael Bush is a beast of a back and a great compliment to Forte. What Forte should do is stay quiet, and double-down that he wont get hurt and play on his 1-year deal. After this season Im sure the Bears wont want to use the tag again, then he can do what he wants. If they do use it again, he will have made about 20 mildo in 2 seasons, so quit the whining or sign a new deal. Or better yet, get some better advice. Im available!!

The thing about John Elway as a player was that he always seemed to get better the more dire the situation. Ever heard of The Drive? Need I say more? Well it seems he save a little of the Elway magic for his job as President of the Broncos. As Ive written here before, part of Tim Tebows allure for me was watching Elways reaction to it. One of the best quarterbacks ever watching this hack. First the team was pressured to put him in. Then he wins a bunch of games to get them into the playoffs. The Elway reactions, facially and verbally, were priceless. He should teach that vacant smile to beauty contestants to use as they are asked questions about topics they have no clue about, like say about anything you would read in a paper. Then after the shocking playoff win against the Steelers, Tebow was the QB of the future, right? Wrong, worst mechanics-ever breath! John Elway is a freaking genius! How could he get rid of his polar quarterbacking opposite, in a city head-over-heels in love with him and not hear one word about it? Sign Peyton Manning, thats how! Even if Manning is done, who cares? Tebow is someone elses problem. (Of course Ill have more on that, but that topic is an entire blog in itself, my little foot soldiers!) He gone! And in the world of Elway, thats all that matters. Plus, youre selling your fan base that you are trying to win now with a future Hall-of-Famer. And he got a fourth-round draft pick! I cant get over what a brilliant move it was on Elways part. Has he ever thought of politics? Better yet, does he want to run my Eagles?

Terps add ex-New Mexico State receiver Teldrick Morgan

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Terps add ex-New Mexico State receiver Teldrick Morgan

One of the most productive receivers in college football during the 2014 season is joining Maryland for the 2016 campaign.

Teldrick Morgan, who spent the first three seasons of his collegiate career at New Mexico State, has joined the Terps as a graduate transfer and will be eligible to play this season.

“Teldrick brings a great deal to our program, and we’re excited that he’s a part of our family,” Maryland head coach DJ Durkin said in the announcement. “It’s always great to bring a local kid back home, and on top of that he’s very skilled and brings a wealth of experience to our receivers unit.”

The 2014 season was a big one for Morgan, a native of the Old Line State. He ranked 32nd in the FBS with 75 receptions and 50th in the nation with 903 receiving yards.

Morgan missed three games last season due to injury and finished with 44 receptions (still a team high) for 543 yards and four touchdowns. He did have a pair of triple-digit receiving-yardage games, though, racking up 151 yards against UTEP and going for 101 yards against Louisiana Monroe.

Maryland can use all the help it can get when it comes to the passing game. The Terps ranked 13th out of 14 Big Ten teams in pass yards per game, averaging just 174.3 yards through the air per Saturday.

Pat Summitt used the sport to empower women at Tennessee and beyond

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Pat Summitt used the sport to empower women at Tennessee and beyond

Needing yet another men's basketball coach, Tennessee officials turned to the one person they thought would be perfect to take over the Volunteers program.

Pat Summitt said no.

She wasn't interested in the job in 1994 after Wade Houston was forced out, and she turned it down again when Jerry Green quit in March 2001. A Tennessee governor once joked he wouldn't have his job if Summitt ever wanted to run her home state.

Breaking the glass ceiling in the men's game, political office, that wasn't Summitt's motivation. She had the only job she ever really wanted.

"I want to keep doing the right things for women all the time," Summitt said in June 2011 after being inducted into her fifth Hall of Fame.

Summitt died Tuesday morning at age 64.

The woman who grew up playing basketball in a Tennessee barn loft against her brothers, and started coaching only a couple years after Title IX was invoked, spent her life working to make women's basketball the equal of the men's game. In the process, Patricia Sue Head

Summitt stood amongst the best coaches in any sport when she retired in April 2012 with more victories (1,098) than any other NCAA coach and second only to John Wooden with eight national championships.

Summitt used the sport and her demand for excellence to empower women and help them believe they can achieve anything, taking no backseat to anyone.

When I moved to Tennessee in 1976, girls played six-on-six, half-court basketball designed to protect them from getting hurt. Summitt, who took her Lady Vols to four AIAW Final Fours, refused to recruit Tennessee players. Tennessee high schools switched to five-on-five rules starting with the 1979-80 season.

The NCAA finally started running a national postseason tournament for the women in 1982. At the time, Summitt was known for having "corn-fed chicks" on her roster, big and strong but not talented enough to win national titles. After she won her first national title in 1987 in her eighth Final Four either in the AIAW or NCAA, she said, "Well, the monkey's off my back."

Back then only a student ID was needed to attend a women's game. And there was no demand for the results of those games. After graduating from Tennessee, I helped the sports writers by bringing notes from an NCAA Tournament game back to the office for someone else to write up. There was no urgency since there was no reader demand.

So Summitt worked to make it impossible to ignore her team or the women's game.

By January 1993, so many people wanted to watch then-No. 2 Tennessee visit top-ranked Vanderbilt that the contest became the first Southeastern Conference women's game to sell out in advance. With children under 6 allowed in free, having a ticket didn't guarantee getting through the door; at least 1,000 were turned away at the door - including Vanderbilt's chancellor.

The Lady Vols won 73-68, a game I covered in my first year as a sports writer for The Associated Press in Nashville.

"This was the biggest game in women's basketball, and that's what I've been waiting 19 years to see," Summitt said. "I'm glad I stayed around to see it."

Summitt scheduled opponents anywhere and everywhere, barnstorming the country to introduce people to women's basketball. Tennessee played Arizona State in 2000 in the first women's outdoor game played at then-Bank One Ballpark, drew the largest crowd ever to a regional championship in March 1998 when 14,848 packed Memorial Gym in Nashville with Tennessee trying to finish off the NCAA's first three-peat and helped Louisville set a Big East record christening the KFC Yum! Center in 2010.

The Lady Vols became must-see TV in the sport as Summitt put the women's game on the national stage with six national titles in the span of 12 years.

I remember when I got real up-close look at what drove Summitt.

Assigned to cover Summitt as part of AP's annual college basketball preview package in the fall of 1998, I spent nearly 30 minutes with the coach in her office.

Door closed, Summitt gave a glimpse of that famous stay-away stare. With undivided attention now on me, she wanted to know if I had talked with her mother, Hazel, for the story. She then showed me the engaging side, laughing when asked about a stretch of play during the 1998 title game that resembled the Showtime Lakers, beaming while reflecting on how well her Lady Vols showed women could play the game.

The Lady Vols lost 69-63 to Duke that season in the East Regional. The next day I left a message at Summitt's house and late that afternoon, she called back to talk about more life lessons and basketball.

"It's a game, and winning and losing both can be great ways to teach kids how to get ready for the real world," said Summitt, who had to stop the interview because her mother had given son, Tyler, a gift. She explained he would have to save some of that cash before buying something for himself. Then she resumed the conversation about the game.

That was Pat Summitt: Hoops and family.

She held everyone to the exacting standards she learned from her father cutting tobacco and helping bale hay on the family farm. Tennessee and Connecticut was the biggest draw in women's basketball with Geno Auriemma and his Huskies handing Summitt her lone title game loss in 1995. But Summitt canceled the series in 2007 and refused to say why other than, "Geno knows."

Summitt ended a nine-year championship drought with her seventh national title in 2007 followed by the eighth in 2008. She became the first NCAA coach to win 1,000 games Feb. 5, 2009, and received a new contract that boosted her annual salary to $1.4 million - far removed from the $8,900 of her first season.

She never got to the 40th season in that contract, her career cruelly and prematurely ended by early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type. She finished 1,098-208 with 18 Final Fours, at the time tying the men of UCLA and North Carolina for the most by any college basketball program.

Not that numbers define Summitt, who once said, "Records are made to be broken."

Yes, all marks fade, but no one will eclipse Summitt's contributions to women's basketball.

How Far Will You Take It? - The Wrigley Field Scoreboard

How Far Will You Take It? - The Wrigley Field Scoreboard

Despite the recent renovations to Wrigley Field, one iconic feature of the century-old ballpark remains the same. The scoreboard.

Still manually operated as it has always been since its installation in 1937, the iconic scorebard is part of the rich tradition of Wrigley Field. With the construction of two large video boards in left and right fields, the center-field scoreboard stands tall to link changing Wrigley with its historic past. 

Kelly Crull takes a ride around Wrigleyville in the all-new Toyota RAV4 Hybrid to bring you the history and evolution of the iconic Wrigley Field scoreboard.