Hetlet continues tradition at Glenbard West

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Hetlet continues tradition at Glenbard West

Chad Hetlet was the perfect choice to follow in the tradition of Bill Duchon and Jim Covert as the head football coach at Glenbard West. Since the 1960s, the Hilltoppers have been known as the "Hitters," a reference to their smash-mouth and bruising style of play.

After Duchon built the program into a state power and Covert, his handpicked successor, picked up the torch and carried it to another level, winning state championship in 1983, the Glen Ellyn school fell on hard times, producing only one winning team from 1996 to 2006.

Duchon, who played for legendary coach Tony Lawless at Fenwick in the 1940s, was 9-0 in 1968, 10-1 in 1975 and finished second in the state in 1976 with his last team. In his last 11 years, he didn't field a losing team.

Covert was 132-58 in 19 years, a .695 winning percentage. He had only two losing teams. His 13-0 team won the state title in 1983.

Hetlet arrived in 2007 to right the sinking ship and restore the program's flagging prestige and tradition. It didn't take long. After a 6-5 start, his last four teams have gone 12-1, 13-1, 10-2 and 10-1. His 2009 team finished second in the state. This year's squad is 10-0 and ranked No. 1 in the state in Class 7A.

In Saturday's 49-21 victory over Elk Grove, the Hilltoppers were led by quarterback Henry Haeffner, who completed 7 of 11 passes for 188 yards and two touchdowns, and running back Scott Andrews, who rushed for 96 yards and two touchdowns. Linebacker Joe Marconi intercepted a pass go set up another touchdown.

They'll play at Libertyville in the second round of the Class 7A playoff.

"They're playing physical again," said Covert, a frequent observer at Saturday home games. "That element of the game was lost for a while. But now it's back. He (Hetlet) has them playing hard all the time. It's the way it used to be."

Hetlet, 40, described his hiring at Glenbard West as "a perfect marriage." He came from an old-school background where players listened to their coaches talk and kept their mouths shut. He learned that running the ball with a physical presence up front and stopping the run on defense was a surefire recipe for success.

"The selling point for me was they always were a smash-mouth style of football team," he said. "You want to go into a program that is similar to yours. It may not be the only way to do it but it's the only way I know. We won't finesse people. We will be successful as long as we are physical and stop the run."

Hetlet came to Glen Ellyn by a back road. A graduate of Zion-Benton in 1990, he played linebacker on the football team. At Northern Illinois, however, he played rugby because he liked the physical aspect of the game. After his freshman year, he changed his major from computer programming to physical education. He wanted to be a coach.

He began teaching at Libertyville and learned Xs and Os under Dale Christenson, Randy Kuceyeski and Tony Monken. Then he got a job at Johnsburg and assisted Bob Bradshaw for eight years. He was head coach at Johnsburg for one year, then went to McHenry for two years, was Mike DiMatteo's defensive coordinator at Hinsdale Central for one year, then moved to Glenbard West.

"I knew Glenbard West had a great history before I came to the western suburbs," Hetlet said. "I knew Duchon and his history. I knew Covert, too. The more the interest level rose, the more I learned.

"So many former players live in Glen Ellyn. We had instant approval from them as to how we played the game. We kept the Hitters program that Duchon established. What we talk about all the time and remind the kids is they come from a long line of great physical football players. It started with them making a name for themselves. When kids buy into being physical, they are tough to stop."

It's all about putting a big green G on the side of your helmet. Duchon had gold helmets and Covert had 100 percent helmets. That was their thing, their trademark. They were Hitters, all of them. The style of football was the same, a bunch of tough kids.

"I believe in that. That's what we have to do to be successful," Hetlet said. "Our kids have to earn their Gs on the side of their helmets. They don't get it until they go through the off-season. Their parents come to the ceremony. It goes with the tradition, who we are. We don't want to pretend that we are the Duchon or Covert era. We want people to think we want to replicate what they did. We don't want to steal what they did. We want
people to talk about us."

Hetlet said his plan for rebuilding Glenbard West's program was borrowed from Bradshaw, who won a state championship at Woodstock in 1983 and then turned around a program at Johnsburg that was 0-9 and produced five playoff qualifiers in eight years.

"I had to go on what I learned from Bradshaw--outwork your opponents, establish a weight lifting program in the spring, hire good positive coaches, establish a work ethic, get the kids to buy into the idea that we are blue-collar and we will outwork and out-physical opponents."

Hetlet admits that if his 2007 team didn't buy into his old-school philosophy, "then the rest of this doesn't happen." The 2007 squad came off an 0-9 season and finished 6-5, losing to Morgan Park 34-27 in the second round of the state playoff.

"They had the worst record but it made them believe that they could win," Hetlet said. "They were physical. We got lucky and made the playoff. We won the last game of the season against Hinsdale Central to qualify. Our confidence rose. The kids said to themselves: 'Hey, we can do this.' Then we started to get talented players to come out, tough, hard-nosed kids."

Other things haven't changed, either. Duchon Field still has natural grass and no lights and looks like a Norman Rockwell painting on a crisp Saturday afternoon in the autumn. The players still ring the victory bell on the hilltop after winning a game.

And the Golden Eagles youth football program is "a huge deal," according to Hetlet. The youngsters are coached and supervised by many former Hitters who grew up in the same program. "Our kids come ready to play at the freshman level--and our freshmen are very successful," he said.

"But now we are different because the kids in the DuchonCovert era were a Glen Ellyn team. Now the boundaries have changed. We're a Glen EllynGlendale Heights team."

But they're still Hitters, make no mistake about that.

Bears: Leonard Floyd approves of deep-dish pizza

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Bears: Leonard Floyd approves of deep-dish pizza

Leonard Floyd admitted it'll take some getting used to the Chicago weather.

As for its pizza? He's already on board with that.

The Bears' first-round selection stopped by CSN's studios late Friday night and got his first taste of deep-dish pizza, specifically a Lou Malnati's pepperoni and sausage pie.

Floyd didn't have much to say while his face was stuffed with the deep-dish.

But when he did a live chat shortly after, he confirmed that the Chicago-style pizza was as good as advertised.

"If I had three thumbs I would hold all of them up," Floyd said. "Pizza was awesome, awesome."

It's safe to say he's fitting in to the Chicago lifestyle quite well already.

Check out Floyd's entire Q+A on our Facebook page.

Recapping the second and third rounds of the NFL Draft

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Recapping the second and third rounds of the NFL Draft

The first 98 selections of the 2016 NFL Draft are in the books. Here's a look at the second and third round choices made Friday night.

(Click here for a recap of Round 1)

Round 2

32. Cleveland Browns: Emmanuel Ogbah, DE, Oklahoma State

33. Tennessee Titans: Kevin Dodd, DE, Clemson

34. Dallas Cowboys: Jaylon Smith, LB, Notre Dame

35. San Diego Chargers: Hunter Henry, TE, Arkansas

36. Jacksonville Jaguars (via Baltimore): Myles Jack, LB, UCLA

37. Kansas City Chiefs (via San Francisco): Chris Jones, DL, Mississippi State

38. Miami Dolphins (via Baltimore via Jacksonville): Xavien Howard, CB, Baylor

39. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Noah Spence, LB, Eastern Kentucky

40. New York Giants: Sterling Shepard, WR, Oklahoma

41. Buffalo Bills (via Chicago): Reggie Ragland, ILB, Alabama

42. Baltimore Ravens (via Miami): Kamalei Correa, LB, Boise State

43. Tennessee Titans (via Philadelphia via Los Angeles): Austin Johnson, DL, Penn State

44. Oakland Raiders: Jihad Ward, DL, Illinois

45. Tennessee Titans (via Los Angeles): Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama

46. Detroit Lions: A'Shawn Robinson, DL, Alabama

47. New Orleans Saints: Michael Thomas, WR, Ohio State

48. Green Bay Packers (via Indianapolis): Jason Spriggs, OT, Indiana

49: Seattle Seahawks (via Chicago via Buffalo): Jarran Reed, DL, Alabama

50. Houston Texans (via Atlanta): Nick Martin, OL, Notre Dame

51. New York Jets: Christian Hackenberg, QB, Penn State

52. Atlanta Falcons (via Houston): Deion Jones, LB, LSU

53. Washington Redskins: Su'a Cravens, LB, USC

54. Minnesota Vikings: Mackensie Alexander, CB, Clemson

55. Cincinnati Bengals: Tyler Boyd, WR, Pittsburgh

56. Chicago Bears (via Seattle): Cody Whitehair, OL, Kansas State

57. Indianapolis Colts (via Green Bay): T.J. Green, DB, Clemson

58. Pittsburgh Steelers: Sean Davis, DB, Maryland

59. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (via Kansas City): Roberto Aguayo, K, Florida State

60. New England Patriots: Cyrus Jones, DB, Alabama

61. New Orleans Saints (via New England via Arizona): Vonn Bell, DB, Ohio State

62. Carolina Panthers: James Bradberry, DB, Samford

63. Denver Broncos: Adam Gotsis, Georgia Tech

THIRD ROUND

64. Tennessee Titans: Kevin Byard, DB, Middle Tennessee State

65. Cleveland Browns: Carl Nassib, DL, Penn State

66. San Diego Chargers: Max Tuerk, OL, USC

67. Dallas Cowboys: Maliek Collins, DT, Nebraska

68. San Francisco 49ers: Will Redmond, DB, Mississippi State

69. Jacksonville Jaguars: Yannick Ngakoue, DL, Maryland

70. Baltimore Ravens: Bronson Kaufusi, DL, BYU

71. New York Giants: Darian Thompson, FB, Boise State

72. Chicago Bears: Jonathan Bullard, DL, Florida

73. Miami Dolphins: Kenyan Drake, RB, Alabama

74. Kansas City Chiefs (via Tampa Bay): KeiVarae Russell, DB, Notre Dame

75. Oakland Raiders: Shilique Calhoun, DL, Michigan State

76. Cleveland Browns (via Tennessee via Los Angeles): Shon Coleman, OL, Auburn

77. Carolina Panthers (via Cleveland via Philadelphia via Detroit): Daryl Worley, DB, West Virginia

78. New England Patriots (via New Orleans): Joe Thuney, OL, N.C. State

79. Philadelphia Eagles: Isaac Seumalo, OL, Oregon State

80. Buffalo Bills: Adolphus Washington, DL, Ohio State

81. Atlanta Falcons: Autin Hooper, TE, Stanford

82. Indianapolis Colts: Le'Raven Clark, OL, Texas Tech

83. New York Jets: Jordan Jenkins, LB, Georgia

84. Washington Redskins: Kendall Fuller, DB, Virginia Tech

85. Houston Texans: Braxton Miller, WR, Ohio State

86. Miami Dolphins (via Minnesota): Leonte Carroo, WR, Rutgers

87. Cincinnati Bengals: Nick Vigil, LB, Utah State

88. Green Bay Packers: Kyler Fackrell, LB, Utah State

89. Pittsburgh Steelers: Javon Hargrave, DL, South Carolina State

90. Seattle Seahawks: C.J. Prosise, RB, Notre Dame

91. New England Patriots: Jacoby Brissett, QB, North Carolina State

92. Arizona Cardinals: Brandon Williams, DB, Texas A&M

93. Cleveland Browns (via Carolina): Cody Kessler, QB, USC

94. Seattle Seahawks (via Denver): Nick Vannett, TE, Ohio State

95. Detroit Lions: Graham Glasgow, OL, Michigan

96. New England Patriots: Vincent Valentine, DL, Nebraska

97. Seattle Seahawks: Rees Odhiambo, OL, Boise State

98. Denver Broncos: Justin Simmons, DB, Boston College

Bears' 3rd rounder Florida DE Jonathan Bullard to add pass rush to front three

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Bears' 3rd rounder Florida DE Jonathan Bullard to add pass rush to front three

The Bears had to cut ties with defensive end Julius Peppers a couple of years ago, only to see him change from a 4-3 end to 3-4 linebacker hybrid for the Green Bay Packers. In the third round of this year’s draft, the Bears added a player whose goal is to emulate Peppers, which would be more than fine with the Bears.

“Julius Peppers is my favorite player,” Florida defensive lineman Jonathan Bullard said at this year’s NFL Scouting Combine.

Bullard was selected by the Bears with the 72nd pick of this year’s draft.

“My oldest brother actually wore No. 90 because of Julius and I wore No. 90 because of my brother but it was actually Julius," Bullard said. "We all watched him play growing up. My brother also played at a D-2 school and I wore 90 in high school.”

No. 90 came available last year when the Bears released defensive tackle Jeremiah Ratliff. It was taken over by Greg Scruggs when he was signed on Dec. 30 for Game 16, but could be Bullard’s in the foreseeable future, particularly if Bullard plays to his self-description.

“I would say my disruption,” Bullard said of his specific strength. “I had a lot of disruption and I make things easier for my teammates to make plays, also.”

They may be very pleased with the progress of Ego Ferguson’s rehab and recovery from season-ending knee surgery but that did not stop the Bears from adding internal pressure on the defensive line with the selection of Bullard.

“We see him as a 3-4 defensive end,” said GM Ryan Pace. “He played defensive end [at Florida], bulked up and played more of a three-technique position for them.

“When you watch tape on him, there’s one thing you can’t coach, and that’s get-off. His get-off is excellent and I think there’s a lot of advantages from just that alone.”

Bullard, 6-3, 285, had 6.5 sacks in 2015 along with 17.5 tackles for loss, good enough to be a semifinalist for the Chuck Bednarik Award. He started eight games at defensive end in 2013, then all 12 games in 2014 and 14 his senior season.

“My junior year I started back out at end…but most of my senior year it was 3-technique,” Bullard said.

With the Bears set at nose tackle with Eddie Goldman and defensive end with Akiem Hicks, Bullard is expected to be part of a rotation inside in sub packages, which the Bears operated out of some 60 percent of the time in 2015, per GM Ryan Pace.

“I think because off my versatility,” Bullard said. “I can do whatever you want me to do on your defensive line, inside to outside, quickness to hold the point. So I think I’m going to bring a lot to your team.’’