Homewood-Flossmoor's Ken Shultz is a Hall of Famer

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Homewood-Flossmoor's Ken Shultz is a Hall of Famer

In his 26 years as a high school administrator, Ken Shultz experienced two embarrassing moments--when an unknowing groundskeeper painted a coach's box behind second base and when he was hosting a regional soccer tournament, turned on a recording of the National Anthem and realized he had forgotten to raise the American flag.

But the crowning achievement of his career was when he orchestrated the first random drug testing program for student-athletes at a high school in the United States.

Even if he hadn't accomplished anything else, that alone is enough to earn the retired athletic director at Homewood-Flossmoor a spot in the fourth Hall of Fame class of the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA).

Shultz will be one of 10 athletic directors to be inducted on Dec. 18 during banquet festivities at the 43rd annual National Athletic Directors Conference at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas.

"When I got a letter from the National Federation, I was surprised," said Shultz, who retired in 2005 and is living in Leesburg, Florida. "You go through a career and do your job and hope you do it to the best of your ability. But you don't think about awards.

"It is very humbling to be recognized by your peers. But this award wouldn't have been possible without H-F, the Illinois Athletic Directors Association and the NIAAA. All of those things go into an award like this, not something I did. You have to have a lot of opportunities in your career."

Shultz made the most of his opportunities. He served as president of the Illinois Athletic Directors Association for one year and served on the organization's board of directors for nine years. At H-F, he supervised 28 varsity sports and 1,400 athletes, 120 coaches, the intramural program involving 1,500 participants, 100 extra-curricular clubs involving 2,000
students, dances, proms, homecomings and a 1 million budget.

But he will be remembered most of all for his courageous decision to launch a random drug-testing program for student-athletes at H-F, only the second school in the country to do it. And he can thank former football coach John Wrenn for that.

"He (Wrenn) came to me and said: 'I have kids I suspect are using illegal substances. I can't prove it but they need help. We need a way to identify kids who need help.' It wasn't a witch hunt or a punitive program. It was a way to help children," Shultz said.

So Shultz, Wrenn and other coaches and staff members spent about five months doing research and putting a plan together. They talked to doctors, hospitals, parents, even the ACLU. "All the coaches were on board but we had to sell the community," Shultz said.

They did the first drug test on Jan. 16, 1990. H-F received national publicity. Shultz appeared on many news outlets, including "The Today Show" and "Good Morning America" and other national news networks.

"Each week, we selected 30 kids at random," he said. "The program was designed to help kids, to help them reject peer pressure. We put it in place for 10 drugs and steroids. It still is in place today. It has lasted the test of time. And there have been no lawsuits. We did it right.

"We helped some kids. It is a good program for H-F. Most people think they can take care of drug issue through education and health classes. But people don't own up to the fact that they have a problem. This program also takes pressure off parents. But you have to commit to the program. Some schools have to live off gate receipts so a drug program is too expensive."

A graduate of Valley High School in West Des Moines, Iowa, in 1966, Shultz participated in cross-country, basketball, baseball and track. He majored in physical education at the University of Illinois, graduating in 1970 and obtaining his masters degree in 1971.

"I wanted to coach," he said. "I had outstanding coaches in high school who were role models. I wanted to be a PE teacher and coach."

He married Kathy, his high school sweetheart, after his freshman year at Illinois and she worked to help him get through school.

He taught and coached at Western Illinois University for two years, then coached at Morris High School for six years. While at Morris, he got turned off to coaching and decided that sports administration would be a better career path.

"At Morris, I got the idea of what it is like to be a not-so-desirable athletic director," he said. "Coaches had to do their own scheduling, budgets, raise money, busing. After six years, I realized that is what an athletic director does. It whet my appetite for getting into athletic administration."

Shultz obtained his certificate and was hired as associate athletic director under John Stanley at H-F. After two years, he knew that he wanted to be an athletic director. But he had to pay his dues. He went to North Olmstead, Ohio, as district athletic director. After two years, he returned to H-F. He had his dream job. He never left again.

The key to being a successful athletic director, someone who is involved with the most visible aspects of everything that goes on at one of the state's most prestigious high schools?

"Surround yourself with good people," Shultz said. "You have to delegate things. You can't be everywhere 247. You get people who like kids. Then the programs will thrive. We always had good facilities. Coaches see that as a great plus. I tried to provide an environment where coaches can be successful and then get out of their way, allow them to coach kids and deal with kids."

According to Shultz, there are two kinds of leadership--management and leadership. A manager makes sure the buses show up and officials show up and arranges for the scheduling of events. But leadership is the inter-action of coaches and people.

"You have to be a good listener, a problem-solver," he said. "At my retirement party, (basketball coach) Roy Condotti said I was Mr. Problem-Solver. He said: 'When I came to him with a problem he fund a way to solve it.' I appreciated that comment more than anything else, that a coach had confidence to come to me. You have to be able to communicate to coaches."

His philosophy? To expand opportunities for student-athletes. The first thing he did when he was hired at H-F was to add seven sports. He had\ orientation meetings for kids and parents. He organized 96 teams in 28 sports, including freshman A, B and C squads.

"If you can't find something outside the classroom, you aren't looking," he said. "I cringe at specialization. I understand a coach's position. But a 5-foot-8 freshman basketball player might be 6-foot-5 as a junior. I believe you should let kids have an opportunity to enjoy all sports. They will choose their favorite sport by themselves as a junior."

But winning is important. "I would be lying if I said it wasn't," he said. He fired eight coaches in 22 years. But it wasn't so much because they were 0-9 but because they couldn't relate to their kids.

"You get a good barometer from the athletes," Shultz said. "I popped in at practices to see how things were going. I looked at how kids were reacting in practice, their energy, whether they were listening, if there was good communication, if they were treating each other with respect.

"I had to release some coaches with good records who didn't interact with kids. A coachathlete relationship is most important. Are kids enjoying their experience? You will lose them if they aren't having fun.

"An athletic director has to be pro-active. His job is so intense. You end up being reactive. You can't anticipate everything. But the longer you are in the profession, you can see if something is leading down the wrong road."

What about parents? Some cynical, longtime coaches argue that high school sports would be a wonderful experience--without parents. Shultz understands their frustration. But the reality of the situation--parents won't go away--means an athletic director must find a way to deal with the issue. Or it will become an issue.

"You have to channel their energies in a positive direction," he said. "In 26 years, I saw parents become more involved. They have a big investment in their kids...off-season competition, college scholarships. The first thing is to get the parents on your side."

Shultz organized "Meet the Coach Night," a series of preseason meetings between coaches and parents. "Parents can be your greatest advocate. You have to communicate with them. Don't be afraid to talk to parents. A coach has to have a thick skin. The worst thing is to shut out the parents. They can be a great support element for the programs," he said.

At H-F, Shultz said parents were involved. They wanted to hear about training rules, the random drug testing program and coaching rules.

"We did a good job of bridging the gap between parents and coaches," he said. "You must embrace the job. You must have a passion for the job. It is a journey. I enjoyed the challenges each day. You never know what will happen each day. There is always the unexpected each day. Every day isn't a great day. But as you go through that adversity, you will be stronger.

"It isn't a job that anyone can do. What do you need to do to be successful? You must be organized. You have to be a good communicator and problem-solver. And you have to have a good secretary. So many people look at the job as a destination. But it is a journey."

Today, Shultz enjoys life in his retirement community 40 miles north of Orlando, south of Ocala. He plays golf, works out and swims in the pool every day.

"But," he said with certainty, "there is nothing to get the juices going like going into an athletic director's job every day and not knowing what will happen, what challenges you will face that day."

Kyle Baun healthy, ready for another chance with Blackhawks

Kyle Baun healthy, ready for another chance with Blackhawks

Kyle Baun couldn’t have asked for a better start to his second NHL season as he made the Blackhawks roster out of training camp.

It didn’t last long, however, as Baun was back with the Rockford IceHogs after two games with Chicago. As for that season in Rockford?

“That was a whole other story,” said Baun.

Indeed, Baun lost a good portion of his Rockford season when his right wrist was sliced twice by another player’s skate in mid-November. That, however, is all behind him. Now Baun hopes to replicate his 2015 camp performances and latch on with the big club longer.

Baun will play in his first preseason game this fall when the Blackhawks face the Pittsburgh Penguins Friday night. The 24-year-old skated is expected to start on a line with Tyler Motte and Tanner Kero, with whom he skated on Friday morning.

“I just want to simulate what I did last year, and it went well at the beginning,” Baun said. “I want to keep working hard, do what I did last year in the exhibition season and hopefully I can stick again.”

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

Baun’s stint was short lived last fall; he was reassigned to Rockford on Oct. 16, and was looking to have a strong season there. Less than a month later, however, he suffered his right wrist injury that sidelined him for more than three months. Baun said he still wasn’t quite right even when he returned.

“I was trying to get back with the wrist and stuff, and I’m not sure it was 100 percent by the time I came back,” said Baun, who now wears Kevlar guards on his wrists. “So it was good to get a summer of training back in and get my legs under me.”

As for that wrist, Baun said it’s definitely “much better now.”

“The strength and dexterity is back,” he said. “It’s a small muscle, so to get the dexterity back was kind of tough.”

Baun is looking for another opportunity. Considering the opportunities for forwards this season, a good showing could lead to some more time in Chicago.

“I’m just trying to focus on my own game like last year. I think that worked for me, trying not to look too, too much into what everyone else is doing,” he said. “Consistency is the biggest thing here. They’re just looking for a guy who can come in, game in and game out, and improve.”

BRIEFLY

- Jonathan Toews, Marian Hossa and Corey Crawford, who just wrapped up their World Cup of Hockey play on Thursday night, will probably get “three or four days off” before joining camp, assistant coach Mike Kitchen said. “They’ve been going for a long time,” Kitchen said. “We’ll give them some time off.”

- Coach Joel Quenneville flew to Pittsburgh with the team.

Three keys and prediction: Notre Dame - Syracuse

Three keys and prediction: Notre Dame - Syracuse

Here are three keys and a prediction for Saturday's Notre Dame-Syracuse game in New Jersey.

1. Make a play on Amba Etta-Tawo: Orange quarterback Eric Dungey targets Etta-Tawo, college football’s leading receiver through four weeks, an average of 13 times a game. Covering Etta-Tawo well is one thing, but that won’t necessarily mean Dungey will look elsewhere to throw the ball. Senior Cole Luke will probably get the first crack at guarding Etta-Tawo, and he’ll have to make a few plays on the ball (a tipped pass, an interception, etc.) to force Dungey out of his comfort zone. If Luke can’t do it, look for an underclassmen — Donte Vaughn, who picked off a pass against Duke, would have to lead that next group — to step in. Stopping Etta-Tawo would go a long way toward keeping the points down against Syracuse’s going-to-plaid offense. 

2. Meet “the standard” on offense. DeShone Kizer has been somewhere between very good and great this season, but it hasn’t been enough for Notre Dame to avoid any of their three losses. Syracuse’s defense is prone to allowing explosive plays and has struggled against the run, so triggering Josh Adams, Dexter Williams and/or Tarean Folston on the ground could allow Kizer to pick apart the Orange secondary as the game goes on. Most importantly, Kizer and his teammates need to avoid carelessly turning the ball over, as they did a few times against Michigan State and Syracuse. 

3. Effective play from the young guys. Kelly said one of the defensive changes we’ll see going forward is a lot more younger, talented players getting on the field in situations in which they weren’t equipped to in Brian VanGorder’s complex defense. Maybe that means defensive end Daelin Hayes using his elite pass rushing trait to pressure Dungey, or linebacker Asmar Bilal using his excellent speed trait to run with a crossing route and break up a pass. No matter how it happens, it has to happen — with that “it” being making defensive plays. Without sacks, TFLs, fumbles and/or interceptions, all that talk of Notre Dame having more “fun” this week will ring hollow on Saturday.

 

Prediction: Notre Dame 45, Syracuse 42. Adams and Williams both have big games on the ground and Kizer leads an offensive oscillating between explosive and efficient to, for the first time this year, enough points to overcome a shaky defensive performance.