Jerry Sandusky is upset over Penn State sanctions

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Jerry Sandusky is upset over Penn State sanctions

From Comcast SportsNet
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -- Jerry Sandusky is distraught over the NCAA penalties issued to Penn State's football program for the school's handling of his child sexual abuse scandal and maintains his innocence as he awaits sentencing, his defense lawyer said Wednesday. Attorney Joe Amendola told The Associated Press in a phone interview that Sandusky told him that even if people believe he is guilty of the crimes for which he was convicted in June, it would be "ridiculous" to think Penn State administrators engaged in a cover-up. The NCAA imposed a multi-year bowl ban on Penn State, invalidated 112 wins, fined the school 60 million and took away future scholarships. The university leadership said the alternative could have been a complete ban on playing games and has acquiesced to the penalties. Wednesday, the NCAA announced it had picked former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell of Maine to monitor Penn State's compliance with the sanctions. Sandusky was convicted in June of 45 counts of child sexual abuse, including attacks on boys inside athletics facilities at Penn State, where he played college football and became a successful defensive coach under Joe Paterno. "He said, To do what they're doing to Penn State is so unjust,'" Amendola said. "He loves the program and he loves the university." Amendola said Sandusky has asked county jail officials to remove him from what is effectively solitary confinement. "He continues to believe that the truth will come out at some point, and that he'll get another trial or another opportunity to establish his innocence," Amendola said. A spokesman for the attorney general's office declined to comment. Amendola said he expects sentencing will occur in September, although a date has not been set. Sandusky, who did not testify on his own behalf during the trial, has been writing a statement to read to Judge John Cleland at sentencing that will address all 10 sets of charges. "Whether he winds up doing it despite what I tell him, is going to be up to him," Amendola said. "It's his life." He said there may not be anything Sandusky can say to prevent an extended prison sentence, but Sandusky has "a fighting spirit" and is "cautiously optimistic." Michael Boni, lawyer for the young man described in court documents as Victim 1, for which Sandusky was convicted of six counts, said the truth came out during the trial. "We care, everybody should care, about what he presents at the sentencing hearing, because it's in all of our interests that he have as long a sentence as possible, hopefully life without parole," Boni said. Amendola said work had begun on an appeal, which may not be filed until after sentencing. If Sandusky appeals to Cleland, rather than going directly to Superior Court, he would have 10 days to file, and Cleland then would have four months to rule, Amendola said. The NCAA said Mitchell will serve as Penn State's athletics integrity monitor for the coming five years, keeping tabs on the school's compliance with the sanctions and related matters. Mitchell's duties will include making four progress reports each year to the NCAA, Big 10 and the university's trustees. Also Wednesday, Cleland struck from the record a filing made by Sandusky co-counsel Karl Rominger last month that challenged an order by the judge designed to figure out if lawyers were leaking information to the media. Cleland's order on Wednesday, citing rules of legal procedure, gave Rominger three weeks to file a new version. Rominger had argued Cleland's demand for a sworn statement listing all material he obtained from prosecutors and gave to third parties would violate protections for attorney work products. A call seeking comment from Rominger was not immediately returned.

How Cubs plan to deploy Javier Baez in the playoffs

How Cubs plan to deploy Javier Baez in the playoffs

CINCINNATI – Using common sense and Geek Department probabilities, Joe Maddon wants to know where the ball should be hit before deciding where to play Javier Baez, the kind of elite defender the Cubs manager envisions when he talks about creating a Gold Glove for super-utility guys. 

“I just like to put him where the most action may be,” Maddon said. “He really provides a lot of coverage on slow rollers. He’s got the arm. He’s got the flair.”

With lefty Jon Lester facing a Cincinnati Reds lineup stacked with right-handed hitters, Maddon started Baez at third base on Saturday at Great American Ball Park, where the Cubs gave a potential sneak preview for their Game 1 playoff lineup.

Baez has been credited with 17 Defensive Runs Saved this year while moving between second base, shortstop and third base, putting together a package of highlight-reel plays and giving Maddon even more freedom with his lineup and in-game strategy.

If offense will be at such a premium in the postseason – putting an even stronger emphasis on pitching and defense – could Baez become an everyday player in October?

“Not 100 percent,” Maddon said. “You catch a lead, he’ll be in the game. I think that we still may go with an offensive matchup – and then hopefully grab a lead – and then get him in there. Do that kind of a thing, not unlike what we did last year with ‘Schwarbs’ (Kyle Schwarber), as an example, (where you) pull him and move everything around.

“I haven’t decided, but that would be my first inclination.”

[SHOP: Buy a Javier Baez jersey]

The Cubs lead the majors in defensive efficiency, a breakthrough that has contributed to 102 wins and helped Lester and Kyle Hendricks put up Cy Young Award-worthy numbers, giving this group an overall dimension that could separate them from the franchise’s previous playoff teams.

“That’s where our pitchers have just been able to relax,” Lester said. “(We) know that: ‘Hey, I don’t have to be so perfect with each pitch.’ We’ve got such good defense behind us that it’s kind of like: ‘OK, just hit it. Those guys will figure it out after that.’”

DeShone Kizer not perfect, but clearly meets the standard for Notre Dame

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DeShone Kizer not perfect, but clearly meets the standard for Notre Dame

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — DeShone Kizer wasn’t perfect, but exact perfection probably doesn’t matter much when you take a flamethrower to something.

That something was Syracuse’s secondary in Notre Dame’s 50-33 win over the Orange Saturday at MetLife Stadium. Kizer threw for 471 yards, 55 short of Joe Thiesmann’s program record and the most an Irish quarterback has ever thrown for in a win. He threw touchdowns of 79, 67 (both to Equanimeous St. Brown) and 54 yards (to Kevin Stepherson) and averaged 13.5 yards per attempt.

Still, what Kizer and coach Brian Kelly were more pleased with was how he played in the second half. Back-to-back quick-strike scoring drives — Kizer connected for that 54-yard touchdown to Stepherson, which Dexter Williams followed with a video game-like 59-yard touchdown run — put the game out of reach awfully quickly after a rocky end to the first half.

“The first half, yeah, you get a bunch of highlights throwing the ball down the field and having one play, two-play drives,” Kizer said. “What we need right now is a way of being sustainable on defense and offense. The second half is a good example of that.”

Kizer didn’t play mistake-free football, though. He missed an easy touchdown when he overthrew a wide-open Stepherson in the first half, and the sack he took late in the second quarter knocked Notre Dame out of field goal range — after which Brisly Estime returned Tyler Newsome’s punt 74 yards to set up an Orange touchdown. And things threatened to get worse when Kizer threw an interception with under 30 seconds left, setting up a Syracuse 40-yard field goal that Cole Murphy missed.

[MORE NOTRE DAME: Defense leaves New Jersey with good vibrations]

Kelly said Kizer tried to do too much late in the first half, but stopped pressing and trying to put the team on his back after those two mishaps.

“That was the conversation I had with him was DeShone, we need to get three points there, you’re trying to do too much,” Kelly said. “And he has a tendency to want to do too much, put too much pressure on himself. And he’s gotta stop doing that. I told him, you do enough. What I liked about him in the second half was that he dropped the ball down, took the easy completions, made the smart decisions and I think he needs to continue to do that. I thought the second half showed the kind of things I was looking for him to do.”

The things Kizer did right emphatically overcame those mistakes. He threw a number of fantastically-placed passes over the middle and consistently looked for easy check down throws. He got both tight ends — Durham Smythe and Nic Weishar — involved in the offense. He rushed for a touchdown, too, his sixth of the year. 

So in front of a bunch of NFL scouts at an NFL stadium — where Kizer could, of course, be playing on Sundays next year — the Notre Dame quarterback turned in yet another strong performance. This time, though, it was good enough to get his team a win.

And it wasn’t perfect, as Kizer was quick to note after the game, but he’ll head back to South Bend pleased with what he did and where he can go from here. 

“This is the sloppiest 50 points I’ve ever been a part of, the sloppiest 400-plus pass game I’ve ever been a part of,” Kizer said. “And I think that’s the best part of about. We’re having fun, we’re having a good time, and there’s still so much room to improve. To come out and play the way we played and have the amount of fun that we had and still know there’s a lot of work to be done, I couldn’t be happier.”