Joe Paterno's will is now public


Joe Paterno's will is now public

From Comcast SportsNet
BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) -- Joe Paterno's will left his personal property to wife Sue and established a trust for the remainder of his estate. The documents released by the family Thursday to The Associated Press include the original seven-page will filed in 1997. The material didn't state how much Paterno or his estate were worth. The Hall of Fame football coach died of cancer in January at age 85, less than three months after being ousted by university trustees in November as part of the fallout over the arrest of retired defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky on child sex abuse charges. The family released the will the same day Sandusky's trial wrapped up its first week in Centre County court. The (Wilkes-Barre) Citizens' Voice reported Sunday that Paterno's will had been sealed by a county judge in April upon request of the estate. "The request was entirely appropriate and totally consistent with the actions of other prominent individuals," the family said in a statement issued through a spokesman. "The only objective was to preserve a measure of privacy for Sue Paterno, their five children, 17 grandchildren and other family members. "In an effort to ensure maximum transparency and eliminate unfounded speculation, the family has decided to make the will publicly available," the family added. They said they would petition the court to unseal all future filings. Sue Paterno was named "personal representative" of the will. The family also released a two-page codicil -- or amendment -- filed in 2010 that named the Paternos' daughters, Mary Kay and Diana, in that order, as the personal representatives if their mother was unable to do so. There is a "clamor of transparency" anytime public documents are sealed without cause or explanation, said Larry Holeva, managing editor of the Citizens Voice and the (Hazleton) Standard-Speaker. "This wasn't about Joe Paterno, simply about ensuring that public documents remain public." Paterno began working at Penn State as an assistant coach in 1950 before being promoted to head coach in 1966. He held Division I records for head-coaching tenure at one school and career victories, with 409. He typically shied away from media questions about his salary and compensation. But the university was compelled to release his salary in 2007 after losing an open records lawsuit. The school's 2011 filing valued Paterno's compensation at just more than 1 million -- a veritable bargain for a coach with two national championships on his resume. Alabama's Nick Saban, for instance, makes more than 5 million a year. Paterno's family last month released details of his state pension, valued at 13.4 million for his 61-year career at Penn State. At the same time, the family also said last month it planned to donate 1.5 million to Penn State-related and State College-area charities. The university in April announced it had agreed to provide millions in payments and benefits to Paterno's estate and family under the late coach's employment contract. Included were four checks worth a total of more than 3 million to cover the season, bowl game and entire career, the university said. Despite the payout, the Paternos did not sign away their right to sue, the family's lawyer said.

Three quick fixes for some Bears woes while searching for a turnaround

Three quick fixes for some Bears woes while searching for a turnaround

Positives were difficult to find in last Thursday’s 26-10 loss to the Green Bay Packers. So maybe the place to look for improvement lies in just getting rid of a few negatives.

As far as positives, Leonard Floyd would be the obvious one, with two sacks, one a strip and fumble recovery for a TD. Ka’Deem Carey would be another, with 10 carries for 48 yards, his second straight game with high-impact running; Jordan Howard has been shackled for two weeks, so the Bears have needed another backfield-committee member contributing. Jeremy Langford may have trouble finding work when he comes back from his ankle injury.

But negatives have far outweighed positives, which is how you get to 1-6. Fixing three of those will go a long way toward improving their chances against a Minnesota Vikings team that appeared eminently beatable in losing at Philadelphia on Sunday:

Stop the penalty hemorrhaging

For the third straight game the Bears had 10 penalties walked off against them. This "streak" started after eight infractions in the win over Detroit. The 10 in Green Bay cost the Bears 108 yards in a game where their offense netted just 189. Seven of the penalties were charged to the defense, six of which gave the Packers first downs.

The three offensive penalties were mental. A wide receiver (Alshon Jeffery) lined up offsides. The quarterback (Matt Barkley) drew a delay flag. An offensive lineman (Ted Larsen) was illegally downfield.

All of which point to a discipline problem getting worse, not better. Whether the fault lies with players losing focus or coaches not instilling a mindset is a debate, but meaningless if the problem is not addressed. “There were a lot of penalties out there,” said cornerback De’Vante Bausby, who committed three of those penalties. “We had a good scheme and plan but we just didn’t finish in the second half as a group.”

Stop the dinking

While Brian Hoyer replacing Jay Cutler scaled back the downfield element of the offense, the loss of an emerging Kevin White should not be understated. The de facto rookie may not have gotten in the end zone but he was leading the team in receptions before he suffered a broken leg in the win over Detroit.

Since the loss of White, however, the offense has shrunk. The Bears averaged 7.5 yards per pass attempt through four games with White. Without White the average is 7.0, and that is including the blip in Indianapolis, which stands as a complete anomaly. The average was 5.9 in the Jacksonville loss and 5.0 in Green Bay.

Hoyer’s ball-security orientation has been a positive, but also a limiting factor. Cutler last year had one of the best ball-security seasons of his career, yet the offense was able to average 7.5 yards per attempt.

The Bears scored two of their three rushing touchdowns in games with White, who may not yet be the field-stretcher his 4.35 speed but the prospect of White arguably made for a more threatening offense than even with the contributions of Cam Meredith.

Stop the Vikings

The Minnesota Vikings have suffered injuries at a rate like the Bears’ but have overcome them. Until Sunday in Philadelphia, when the Eagles sacked Sam Bradford six times and hit him more than a dozen other times. The Vikings never sacked Carson Wentz, who wasn’t special but was good enough while Minnesota was self-destructing.

The Vikings have beaten the Bears the last three times they’ve met, the first time that’s happened since 1999 and 2000, which is also the last time the Bears started 1-6. And the Bears have lost three straight.

The Bears were able to end the first three-game skid by focusing on one game: the Lions. The result was shutting down a very good offense, the lowest yardage-allowed (263) of the season and the firmest commitment to the run game (29) attempts.

Morale inside the locker room can only be revived by a win. One game. This game.

Morning Update: Cubs head to Cleveland; Fire lose in season finale

Morning Update: Cubs head to Cleveland; Fire lose in season finale

Preview: Blackhawks host Flames Monday on CSN

World Series drought will soon end for Cubs or Indians

Report: Bears looking for Jay Cutler return against Vikings; Matt Barkley on stand-by

Richard Panik fueling Blackhawks' top line

Fire wrap 2016 season with loss at Toronto

PHOTOS: Cubs leave Wrigley Field and head to Cleveland

Indians announce starting rotation for World Series vs. Cubs

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts: Cubs ‘really have no weaknesses’

Bulls: Fred Hoiberg, Dwyane Wade soak themselves in Cubs fever

The moment Billy Williams knew the 2016 Cubs were destined for the World Series