Kleinschmidt lands 'my dream job'

600388.png

Kleinschmidt lands 'my dream job'

Tom Kleinschmidt is a Catholic Leaguer at heart. His roots are buried deep at Gordon Tech. In 1990, he led the basketball team to one of the most significant achievements in school history. So it isn't surprising to see him return as the Rams' new coach.But it wasn't a no-brainer. Sure, it is the "dream job" that he often thought about during his spectacular college career at DePaul and his professional career in Japan. But leaving York after one season as head coach was a "tough" decision."I had some great kids at York," Kleinschmidt said. "I had great parents, too. Usually you hear war stories about parents and their involvement with the program but I had wonderful relationships. The school made it easy for me."York, like many city and suburban schools, is undergoing budget cuts. The Elmhurst school recently laid off 10 teachers. Coaching assignments were being cut. The administration couldn't guarantee Kleinschmidt a job beyond the current year. "It was a year-to-year thing," he said.Kleinschmidt had enjoyed his first season as a head coach. York finished 22-9 after a 4-7 start. The Dukes won 13 in a row and 18 of their last 19, including a victory in the Martin Luther King tournament at Galesburg. They lost to Lake Park by four in the regional final.After he retired from basketball a few years ago, Gordon Tech approached him and inquired if he was interested in coaching. But he didn't have a degree. He returned to DePaul to complete his education, served on DePaul coach Jerry Wainwright's staff for two years, then went to York.After last season, Gordon Tech coach Shay Boyle resigned to join the staff at Notre Dame in Niles. Once again, Gordon Tech called to see if Kleinschmidt was interested in the job."My situation was in a flux," he said. "I interviewed for the job. York knew about it. After six weeks, they still couldn't give me a guarantee that I'd have a job at York. So I decided to take the Gordon Tech job. I got a hefty raise to come to Gordon Tech. In fact, I'll make more money than at York. I'll teach physical education and speech and I'll go back to college to get my teaching certificate. It is a win-win situation for everyone."Kleinschmidt had more to work with at York. He leaves behind three starters from last year's squad, including 6-foot-7 forward Frank Toohey and David Cohn, one of the best point guards in the state. And last year's sophomore squad was 20-5."I left a good situation. Last year, we finished second in the conference with two sophomores and a junior. This year, we figure to contend for the conference title," he said. "In one year, we made a lot of progress. The kids bought into my system. It's tough to leave. It wasn't a good four weeks thinking about leaving. The kids were continuously on my mind. But finally, I had to do what was best for me."At Gordon Tech, he inherits five of the top seven players from a 14-15 team that lost to Rockford Lutheran in the Class 2A sectional final. But the Rams are saddled with a 31-game conference losing streak. This year's trip to the sectional final marked their first since 2000.It isn't the way it used to be. In 1980, when Tom Winiecki coached Gordon Tech to the state football championship, the school had an enrollment of 2,000 boys. Today, the enrollment is 400 boys and girls. Gone are the days when the basketball teams of coaches Dick Versace, Dan Chubrilo, Bob Ociepka, Steve Pappas and Scott Bogumill dominated the Catholic League and ranked among the best in the state."It's a different atmosphere and culture than when I played," Kleinschmidt said. "Some people still are there who were there when I was there. But this is something I wanted all along. I was hopeful that I could go back and help Gordon Tech as they helped me. But it wasn't an easy decision. It wasn't about money."At York, you can't recruit. At Gordon Tech, I have to get out and outwork people and persuade kids to come to Gordon Tech who have been going to Whitney Young, Lane Tech, Fenwick, Notre Dame, Loyola and St. Ignatius. It's all about re-establishing relationships in the community."I can capitalize on my name. It might get me in the door. But it won't close the deal. They have to buy into what I am telling them. I have to sell them on the person I am and how I can help their kids. I have to show up for football games. I remember that coach Pappas came to my baseball games. He must want me, I thought to myself. I have to be visible. I have no problem going to Welles Park or Horner Park. I used to hang out with their fathers."So Kleinschmidt will be re-establishing relationships at the neighborhood parishes that once stocked Gordon Tech with football and basketball talent, including Queen of Angels, St. Benedict, St. Gertrude, St. Hilary, St. Malachi and St. Andrew, all within a two-mile radius of the school. Parents and potential athletes will be asking some of the same questions that Kleinschmidt asked when he interviewed for the job. Yes, he asked about the future of Gordon Tech. In recent years, there have been rumors that it might close ever since Kleinschmidt graduated in 1991. But he was assured that the school won't close. Enrollment has increased by 10, 10 and 20 percent in the last three years.He blames the economic downturn and changes in the neighborhood for the decline of the basketball program at Gordon Tech. When he attended the school, the tuition was 1,250 a year. Now it is 8,500. And that is lowest prices for a Catholic school education in the Chicago area compared to tuitions of 1,400 to 1,600 at Fenwick, Loyola or St. Ignatius."There are positive signs. The neighborhoods are coming back. Catholic grade schools are turning kids away. They aren't on decline anymore," he said. "I've got to do it like I always do it--outwork people, get in the gyms, extend my hand to alumni and old-timers and old friends. I look forward to playing in the Catholic League again."One of his first stops will be at annual Catholic League Hall of Fame dinner on May 3.

Artemi Panarin shows off Duncan Keith's Russian singing skills

Artemi Panarin shows off Duncan Keith's Russian singing skills

Duncan Keith isn't quitting his day job anytime soon, but maybe he can moonlight as a Russian singer.

Artemi Panarin — Keith's Blackhawks teammate and a native of Korkino, Russia — posted an Instagram video Friday of Keith signing along to a song called "Gop-Stop:"

Канадский #розенбаум 😂 Canadian #singer @dk_2_

A video posted by @artemiypanarin on

Here's the YouTube video of the song, which is a famous Russian gangster song:

This is exactly what social media was made for: Bringing worlds together for the amusement and entertainment of others.

Also, hat/tip to Keith for his quality singing/rapping skills.

Dwyane Wade not buying into the Bosh to Bulls speculation

Dwyane Wade not buying into the Bosh to Bulls speculation

ATLANTA — One of the reasons Dwyane Wade was so attractive to the Bulls in free agency was a perceived ability to bring other stars along with him at some point.

Enter Chris Bosh and an ESPN rumor that states the Bulls would be first in line if Bosh becomes free from the Miami Heat on March 1. 

Bosh hasn't played for the Heat in nearly a year after a reoccurrence of blood clots, which could ultimately be deadly. Bosh and the Heat are at an impasse; Bosh wants to play, believing he's found a medication that could work for him and his condition, while the Heat don't feel it's prudent or safe for him to suit up. 

Thus, the impasse.

Since Wade and Bosh are former teammates — and Bosh appeared at the United Center earlier this month for a Bulls-Raptors game — the Bulls seem like they could be a natural destination should he become free.

"Who came up with that? I don't know. I play with the Bulls and I don't even know that," Wade said after the morning shootaround at Philips Arena in Atlanta. "That's news to me, he's one of my good friends. The biggest thing with Chris is the same thing, you know, is his health. He's not even playing basketball right now. He's going to continue on his health and I think that's what he's doing."

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

The Heat can get Bosh off their salary cap Feb. 9th, the anniversary of the last game he played for them. Bosh played 53 games last year after playing 44 in the 2014-15 season, when the blood clot issue first appeared.

A player averaging 20 points and 7.2 rebounds — Bosh's numbers in the 97 games he's played since LeBron James left the Miami Heat in free agency — would be a boon, but as Wade said, his health has to come first for Bosh and whatever franchise is potentially looking at him.

It's already tricky enough when involving Bosh's desire to play and his support from the NBPA, but the NBA doesn't want to have a player potentially die on their watch, making it more difficult for a prospective team to step in and offer Bosh.

"Basketball is something he loves and I'm sure somewhere in the back of his mind he would love to be able to do again," Wade said. "But I know his steps and he's that moment is not here now. I can't even talk about next year."

Wade said the thought of Bosh coming to Chicago hasn't come up in their recent conversations, although even if it had, Wade wouldn't be the one to stoke the flames of speculation when there's so many other hurdles to clear.

"I talk to him. A lot of the issue with the Heat is at the end of the day he has something serious and they want to make sure it's not life-threatening and then it goes from there," Wade said. "Things are said and things are done, but at the end of the day, as I've always said about Chris, I know Chris is worried about his health first.

"He has a family that he loves and he wants to make sure that he's as healthy and whole as he can but also he loves the game of basketball so when that day comes there are always going to be stories about guys where they have friends at."