The latest from the Jerry Sandusky trial

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The latest from the Jerry Sandusky trial

From Comcast SportsNet
BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) -- Jerry Sandusky's defense attorney compared the former Penn State assistant coach's high-profile child sex-abuse trial to a soap opera on Tuesday, telling reporters to "stay tuned" to find out if Sandusky would take the stand in his own defense. Asked what soap opera he'd compare the trial to, defense attorney Joe Amendola initially said "General Hospital," then "All My Children." Sandusky is charged with 51 criminal counts related to 10 alleged victims over a 15-year span. He's accused of engaging in illegal sexual contact ranging from fondling to forced oral and anal sex. Prosecutors rested their case Monday after presenting 21 witnesses, including eight who said they had been assaulted by Sandusky. The identities of two other alleged victims are unknown to investigators. After Monday's session wrapped up, Sandusky looked an Associated Press reporter in the eye and said nothing when asked if he planned to testify. Judge John Cleland said defense witnesses should be finished by mid-day Wednesday, and closing statements were expected Thursday morning. The defense portion of the case included a former Penn State coach who said he knew Sandusky brought boys into showers but never saw him do anything wrong. The six witnesses spoke to Sandusky's reputation but did little to directly counter the accusers' testimony. Remaining possible defense witnesses include Sandusky's wife, Dottie, and an expert who could discuss whether Sandusky has "histrionic personality disorder," which experts have called a personality disorder characterized by inappropriate sexual behavior and erratic emotions. The list of potential witnesses also includes a physician who spoke with key prosecution witness Mike McQueary the night he said he saw Sandusky attack a child in a football team shower in 2001, and members of former football coach Joe Paterno's family, although it was unclear how they might fit into the defense case or whether they will be called. Sandusky's arrest led the university trustees to fire Paterno as coach in November, saying his response to the 2001 report from McQueary showed a lack of leadership. Paterno died of cancer in January. Dick Anderson, a longtime Penn State assistant and Sandusky friend who retired in January, testified that he and other members of the football staff were present when Sandusky brought young boys into the team's showers. He said he never witnessed anything inappropriate. "If Jerry would bring someone in with The Second Mile, they had been working out, for whatever reason they came in, it was not uncommon ... with the other coaches in the shower as well," Anderson said, referring to the charity for at-risk children Sandusky founded in 1977. Anderson, who coached at Penn State from 1970 to 1983 and again from 1990 through the 2011 season, said adults and children often shower together at gyms. He noted, for example, that it's not unusual for him to be in the showers with boys at the YMCA. Anderson also spoke in detail about the long hours of coaching and the recruiting trips required for the job, which could lay the groundwork for a defense argument that accuser testimony about regular contact with Sandusky may be inaccurate or exaggerated. Anderson said he did not know Sandusky had been barred by university administrators from taking children onto campus after the 2001 incident was reported by McQueary, although that was disclosed in court documents and has been widely and repeatedly reported since Sandusky's arrest. When lead prosecutor Joe McGettigan asked him if that fact would surprise him, Anderson said yes. The defense's case focused largely on Sandusky's reputation. Anderson said he was "well thought of in every regard," former Penn State assistant coach Booker Brooks called his reputation "exemplary, top-notch," and local political consultant Brent Pasquinelli, who raised money for The Second Mile, called him "a local hero." Besides Anderson, Brooks and Pasquinelli, three other witnesses testified for the defense Monday: a woman who ran a golf-related charity to which one accuser was recommended by Sandusky, a young man who knew Sandusky through The Second Mile and vouched for his reputation, and a schoolteacher who said Sandusky seemed genuinely interested in helping one of the alleged victims in the case. None was on the stand for more than 10 minutes. Tom Kline, a Philadelphia lawyer who represents one of the accusers, said he was served a defense subpoena on Monday, ordering him to produce a copy of the fee agreement he has made with Victim 5, along with copies of his interactions with reporters.

Bears No. 1 offense moving in wrong direction after three preseason games

Bears No. 1 offense moving in wrong direction after three preseason games

If there are solutions lurking in the rubble that has been the Chicago Bears 2016 offense, they are staying hidden. And the problems have to be more than just the loss of coordinator Adam Gase and stalwarts Martellus Bennett, Matt Forte and Matt Slauson.

But in the longest stretch of playing time yet this preseason, a 23-7 loss Saturday to the Kansas City Chiefs, the Bears repeatedly dropped passes, ran wrong routes, failed to execute blocks and generally looked like an offense that has taken significant steps backward since last season.

“We’ve still got some time,” said quarterback Jay Cutler. “We’ve still got some time to get better. We’re still missing some guys and we’re going to have an influx of guys coming into the lineup that’ve been missing the past couple of weeks, which is going to help us, make us a little more dynamic out there.

“We’ve just got to keep working.”

The No. 1 offense ran 18 first-half plays and netted 20 yards – five fewer than the team gave the Chiefs in penalties. And matters got worse. The Bears ran 11 plays in the second quarter for a net minus-11 yards.

The Bears went to the line of scrimmage three times in the final 6 seconds of the first half. Those trips produced a false start by Alshon Jeffery (which pushed the Bears back across midfield and out of what would have been their only play in the Kansas City end of the field through 30 minutes); a bounced pass from Cutler in the direction of Marc Mariani when no Chief was within 20 yards of the Bears wide receiver; and a sack by 346-pound nose tackle Dontari Poe, who had one sack in 15 games last season.

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The Bears had practiced those situations as recently as this week, though “we need to prepare more, obviously,” Cutler said, smiling.

Franchise-tagged Jeffery did not limit his issues to the pre-snap penalty. He caught none of the three passes targeted for him in the first half and let one go off his hands with Kansas City cornerback Marcus Peters on the ground, a victim of the loose Soldier Field sod.

“I was just trying to catch it and take off,” Jeffery said. “But you still got to catch it.”

When the offense finally managed to cross midfield, on its first possession of the third quarter, the drive included a bad drop of a bubble screen to wide receiver Kevin White, a badly run route by White near the end zone, and finally a missed field goal by Robbie Gould from 48 yards.

“It’s just growing pains,” Cutler said. “It’s just kind of how it is, his ‘rookie’ year, not really playing a lot of college football… . We’re working with him and he’s doing everything he possibly can to work through it and be where it’s supposed to be.

“And he understood it. I talked to him on the sideline and just told him this is going to happen. And now he knows and it just can’t happen again. We just can’t have repeat mistakes. He’s a good kid and he’s going to do well.”

The rest of the offense? Since most of the starters will play little if at all next Thursday at Cleveland, the improvement is going to have to come from within, from practice. It didn’t happen in games, where it is generally supposed to.

Bears quarterback Connor Shaw reportedly suffers broken leg in preseason loss

Bears quarterback Connor Shaw reportedly suffers broken leg in preseason loss

A little over a year ago Connor Shaw suffered a season-ending injury during a preseason game with the Cleveland Browns.

Unfortunately, history has likely repeated itself.

According to NFL Network's Ian Rapoport, Shaw endured a broken leg right above his left ankle in the Bears' 23-7 preseason loss to the Kansas City Chiefs on Saturday afternoon. After connecting with wide receiver Josh Bellamy for an 18-yard completion in the fourth quarter, the Bears quarterback had his left leg folded by Chiefs defensive lineman Rakeem Nunez-Roches. Shaw stayed on the grass for a few minutes, writhing in pain, before having his left leg put in an air cast and leaving Soldier Field on a cart. 

Following the game, Bears head coach John Fox said that Shaw's injury is "very serious" and that he was on his way to the hospital for further examination.

[MORE BEARS: Bears severly outplayed in another home preseason game]

The devastating injury comes at inopportune time for Shaw who has arguably been the best player in a Bears uniform this preseason.

Before leaving Saturday's game, Shaw was 5/6 for 68 yards with a QB rating of 153.5 including a 16-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Cameron Meredith. Shaw also showed an ability to make things happen with his legs as he had two carries for 15 yards. It was the second consecutive eye-opening performance for Shaw. In last week's preseason loss to the New England Patriots, Shaw was for 4/6 with 42 yards and a touchdown pass.

Shaw had already surpassed David Fales as the Bears' third-string quarterback, and was starting to push Brian Hoyer — who coincidentally suffered an injury to his ribs against the Chiefs — for the backup job behind Jay Cutler. At worst, Shaw would have been a practice squad candidate.

"I've known him since his rookie year in Cleveland and he's really worked hard," Hoyer said. "He's done a good job and to see that, it's really heartbreaking obviously for him, and for a guy that's watched him develop and grow you just really feel for him.

"He's a tough and resilient kid. He's going to be back, but now it's going to be a dark time. That's just the way it is. That's part of football and unfortunately happened to a great kid."

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Bears wide receiver Alshon Jeffery, who played with Shaw at South Carolina, has no doubt Shaw's will bounce back from the injury.

“It’s a tough break,” Jeffery said. "He was having a hell of a camp. He was doing a hell of a job out there. You hate to see any teammate go down, but I know him personally being with him in college. He’s a fighter. He’s going to come back.”

Bears severly outplayed in another home preseason game

Bears severly outplayed in another home preseason game

It's easy to dismiss preseason games, but they can't be ignored when a team is severely outplayed in every sense of the word.

That was the case for the Bears on Saturday afternoon as they were dismantled by the Kansas City Chiefs, 23-7, in front of a crowd of 48, 377 at Soldier Field to remain winless on the preseason.

The Bears starting offense compiled a net of 65 yards as they couldn't find a rhythm against a Chiefs defense playing without Pro Bowlers' Justin Houston, Eric Berry and Tamba Hali.

Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was able to stay upright for most of the game as the starting offensive line allowed just two sacks, but Cutler was plagued by a few drops from his receivers and was off target for most of the afternoon, finishing 6/15 with 45 yards and a passer rating of 47.9. The Bears starting wide receiving tandem of Alshon Jeffery and Kevin White registered the same amount of drops (three) as they did receptions. The lone highlight from the starting offensive unit came from second-year running Jeremy Langford who twice turned broken plays into positive gains, showing a remarkable improvement in that facet from his rookie season.

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While the starting offensive unit will draw much-deserved criticism for their performance against the Chiefs, the defense didn't fare that much better.

The starting 11, playing without Pernell McPhee and Kyle Fuller, allowed 239 total yards in the first half. The starting unit also lost their only proven cornerback when eight-year veteran Tracy Porter entered the NFL's concussion protocol after taking a knee to the head by teammate Harold Jones-Quartey in the second quarter. 

Despite Saturday's mediocre play by the defense, there were some positives including the first NFL interception by Bears rookie cornerback Deiondre' Hall who looks to be squarely in the mix for a starting cornerback job with the abundance of injuries at the position. Rookie defensive tackle Jonathan Bullard also continued his strong preseason play with another sack. First-rounder Leonard Floyd suited up but didn't play due to a hamstring injury.

The Bears finally broke a near 55-minute scoring drought when third-string quarterback Connor Shaw connected with wide receiver Cameron Meredith for a 16-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. Shaw suffered a left ankle injury on the next series and had to leave on a cart. He finished the game 5/6 for 65 yards and a touchdown, also adding 15 rushing yards on two carries.

In two preseason home games the Bears have been outscored 45-7. They were blanked by the Denver Broncos back in Week 1 on Aug. 15.

The Bears will look to avoid going winless for the first time in franchise history in preseason when they close out their exhibition slate against the Browns in Cleveland next Thursday.