Lemming All-Area banquet set for Soldier Field

782004.png

Lemming All-Area banquet set for Soldier Field

The Chicago Daily News and Chicago Sun-Times once sponsored gala All-Area banquets to recognize the best high school athlete in the city and suburbs in football, boys and girls basketball, soccer, volleyball, softball and baseball. But they were shuttered years ago because of the skidding economy.

They were grand events conducted at the Como Inn, which has since gone the way of the banquets it once hosted. Some of the leading college coaches in the nation were guest speakers, including Bob Knight, Pat Summitt, Ray Meyer, Lou Holtz, Lute Olson, Johnny Orr, Vivian Stringer, Bo Schembechler and Lloyd Carr. Isiah Thomas and Cheryl Miller also spoke.

Ironically, the last speaker at the football banquet was recruiting analyst Tom Lemming of CBS Sports Network.

"That was in 2000. I was so impressed with the Sun-Times banquet. I was there for the first time in 1980 when (Thornton Fractional North quarterback) Mike Tomczak was Player of the Year," Lemming said.

"All the college coaches were at there. I realized that coaches don't have a lot of time to eye-ball the kids. But they let the kids know they were there. It was good interaction. The Sun-Times always did a great job of honoring the kids. They were so excited to be there."

After the Sun-Times banquets were discontinued after 2000, Lemming decided to organize his own All-Area football banquet. "I was surprised when the Sun-Times dropped its banquet. I wanted to do something similar, to keep it going," he said.

So the Tom LemmingNCSA Underclass All-Area Banquet was founded. It is sponsored by the Chicago-based National Collegiate Scouting Association, which assists male and female student-athletes in all sports to find the right college. Chris Krause, NCSA's founder and president, was a linebacker at North Chicago in 1984 when he was evaluated by Lemming.

He also wanted to expand the event to include the top players in all classes. "I wanted to invite the best players in each class who have had great seasons or great potential. It is important that they get as much exposure to college recruiters as they can," Lemming said.

Lemming's 10th annual All-Area banquet will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 5 at Soldier Field's banquet hall. The guest speaker will be Michigan coach Brady Hoke. The event isn't open to the public.

A total of 60 players have been invited, including six seniors, 40 juniors, 10 sophomores and four freshmen. The seniors are Maine South quarterback Matt Alviti, Joliet Catholic running back Ty Isaac, Lemont tackle Ethan Pocic, Marian Central quarterback Chris Streveler, Crete-Monee wide receiver Laquon Treadwell and Bolingbrook quarterback Aaron Bailey.

The junior list is headed by Hales Franciscan lineman Denzel Ward, Plainfield South linebacker Clifton Garrett, Stevenson safety Matt Morrissey, Lincoln-Way East center Nick Allegretti, Hinsdale Central center Brian Allen, Bolingbrook safety Parrker Westphal, Crete-Monee linebacker Nyles Morgan, Glenbard North running back Justin Jackson, Richards running back Tommy Mister and Marist tight end Nic Weishar.

One of the biggest players on the list is 6-foot-6, 285-pound freshman tackle Erik Swenson of Downers Grove South. He is the first freshman in 33 years to start for coach John Belskis. He was invited to the Michigan camp as a seventh grader.

"If they are starting as freshmen, they will be great players as seniors," Lemming said. "Swenson will be a national name in three years. Not too many freshmen start in big-time programs."

Last year, 70 college coaches attended Lemming's event. In past years, the list of speakers has included Notre Dame's Brian Kelly, Illinois' Ron Zook, Iowa's Kirk Ferentz, Nebraska's Bill Callahan, Notre Dame's Charlie Weis, Purdue's Danny Hope and Minnesota's Tim Brewster.

"My main reason for doing this is to get as many colleges as possible to come to Chicago to recruit kids," Lemming said. "Our high water mark was the class of 1986, which had 141 players sign full scholarships to Division I schools.

"Of course, there are NCAA rules to follow and limitations on the amount of contact a coach can have with a player. Coaches can come and say hello but they can't talk to the kids. They sit in the back of the room and eye-ball the kids. It's a win-win situation. The kids know which colleges are represented and who is interested in them."

Lemming is determined to persuade more college coaches to recruit in Chicago, like they did in the 1980s. He hopes to attract at least 100 this year. There still are some schools that don't come to Chicago but there are some that have been making frequent visits in the last year or two, including Ole Miss, Vanderbilt, Alabama, Vanderbilt, LSU, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, New Mexico, New Mexico State and Miami (Fla.).

White Sox conclude suspended game with Tigers on CSN

White Sox conclude suspended game with Tigers on CSN

The White Sox conclude their suspended game against the Detroit Tigers, and you can catch all the action on Comcast SportsNet. The 3-3 game will pick up in the top of the ninth at 1:10 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.  

[SHOP WHITE SOX: Get your White Sox gear right here]

— Channel finder: Make sure you know where to watch.

— Latest on the White Sox: All of the most recent news and notes.

— See what fans are talking about before, during and after the game with White Sox Pulse.

Cubs have ‘all kinds of different lines in the water’ leading up to trade deadline

Cubs have ‘all kinds of different lines in the water’ leading up to trade deadline

MILWAUKEE – The White Sox would never trade Chris Sale to the North Side and give the Cubs this year’s potential American League Cy Young Award winner to pair with the National League’s reigning Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta), the game’s most entertaining manager (Joe Maddon) and one of the most iconic venues in sports (Wrigley Field), making the biggest story in baseball ever bigger.

Silly season is already in full swing with reports that the White Sox sent Sale home from U.S. Cellular Field on Saturday…because their all-world pitcher cut up throwback jerseys he didn’t want the team to wear during his scheduled start against the Detroit Tigers.

You can’t make this stuff up. But it’s yet another reminder of what Cubs general manager Jed Hoyer predicted leading up to the Aug. 1 trade deadline: “Expect the unexpected.”   

By late Saturday night, Twitter buzzed about a Fox Sports report that the New York Yankees are telling teams that they will hold onto All-Star reliever Andrew Miller and are moving closer toward dealing 100-mph closer Aroldis Chapman.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

President of baseball operations Theo Epstein never likes to rule anything out, running a front office that keeps all options open. So expect to hear more rumors about the Cubs trying to engineer a deal for a controllable starting pitcher, canvassing the bullpen market and scouting rentals like Oakland A’s outfielder Josh Reddick.

“All I know is that Theo and Jed really have all kinds of different lines in the water,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 6-1 loss to the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park. “Like any of the GMs at this time of the year, they’re always going to look to make us better. So if something makes sense to these boys, I’m sure we’re considering it.”

It’s difficult to see Reddick or the offense being a priority or a focal point when the Cubs are so loaded with position players and have plenty of short- and long-term pitching issues. But the Epstein regime has already poured so much capital into their lineup, rebuilding the franchise around hitters. Why stop now?

Epstein has also hinted the Cubs could pivot in a bad market for starting pitching or if the prices for relievers become prohibitive.

 [RELATED: Cubs ready to activate Joe Nathan, but is that enough for this bullpen?]  

“Sometimes, if the marketplace makes it hard to improve a weakness,” Epstein said, “you can compensate for that by making an area of strength even stronger. That’s not necessarily the direction we’re going to go, but it could be.”

Reddick has Boston Red Sox roots, hits left-handed and will become a free agent after this season. The Cubs just welcomed back their leadoff guy (Dexter Fowler) and have a Gold Glove right fielder with a $184 million contract (Jason Heyward) and multiple options in left field (Kris Bryant, Ben Zobrist, Willson Contreras) plus Chris Coghlan (strained ribcage) and Jorge Soler (strained hamstring) rehabbing at Double-A Tennessee.

“‘CC’ last year was really big for us and we’re still waiting on George,” Maddon said. “I wouldn’t create conjecture for or against. I mean, it’s possible, it absolutely is. They are really hunkered down trying to figure out what’s best for us right now.

“They’re probably looking at us as two different teams versus righties and versus lefties and what we need in those particular moments. And: How far is George actually? I don’t think George is that far off, and I don’t think ‘CC’ is either. But regarding my conversations with (Theo and Jed), they are looking at a lot of different options.”

White Sox mum on Chris Sale incident after suspended game against Tigers

White Sox mum on Chris Sale incident after suspended game against Tigers

The White Sox and Detroit Tigers will resume play of their suspended game — which is tied 3-3 to begin the top of the ninth — on Sunday after a third rain delay finally washed things out Saturday night at U.S. Cellular Field. 

But literal storms paled in comparison to the figurative one that erupted from the White Sox clubhouse involving ace left-hander Chris Sale. The American League's All-Star Game starter was scratched from his start about 30 minutes before the scheduled first pitch, with a vague statement from general manager Rick Hahn mentioning a “non-physical” incident in the clubhouse that was under investigation by the team

Just as the game's second rain delay hit, though, a report surfaced — which was later confirmed by CSNChicago.com’s Dan Hayes — that Sale, who started for the American League All-Stars last week in San Diego, was so furious over having to wear the team’s 1976 throwback uniforms that he cut them up so they couldn’t be worn. Sale was sent home by the White Sox after the incident. 

The White Sox will still start All-Star left-hander Jose Quintana for Sunday’s series finale — which will begin 30 minutes after the final out of the suspended game, which will resume play at 1:10 p.m. on Comcast SportsNet — and manager Robin Ventura said he doesn’t have any plans for when Sale will make his next start. 

“I’ll talk about the game, but any of that stuff, we’ll wait on that,” Ventura said when asked about the Sale incident. “I know the team put out a release on that and we’re just going to stick with that. I’m not going to discuss what went on in there. But unfortunate he didn’t start tonight and proud of the guys that came in and filled in.”

Third baseman Todd Frazier declined comment — “I can’t really talk anything about that,” he said — as did right-hander Matt Albers, who started and threw two innings as the first cog in a seven-pitcher “Johnny Wholestaff” game.  

"I think we're going to keep that in-house,” Albers said. “For me, obviously you guys probably know what happened, but for me as a player, and in our clubhouse, we're going to keep in in-house. So, you're going to have to ask somebody else about that."

Without anything close to ample time to shuttle a starting pitcher up from the minor leagues to replace Sale, the White Sox went with Albers despite the 33-year-old throwing an inning both Thursday and Friday against the Tigers. Albers said he was told he would start the game around 4:30 p.m. 

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

The White Sox needed seven relievers to get through the evening, with Albers, Dan Jennings and Tommy Kahnle all soaking up two innings and Zach Duke, Nate Jones and David Robertson combining for the final two frames before more heavy storms slammed the South Side. 

“(Sale’s) one of the best, absolutely,” Albers said. “But we're here for teammates. We're here to pick each other up in good times and bad, so we're just here to pick whoever up whenever."

On Thursday, general manager Rick Hahn said the White Sox are open to all options at the trade deadline outside of adding a short-term rental, meaning that a complete teardown and rebuild of the roster is on the table, even if it’s ultimately an unlikely scenario. But Frazier said the swirling rumors about plenty of players in the clubhouse aren’t fraying — or causing bizarre, national storylines — a White Sox team that only has one win since the All-Star break. 

“That’s happened to me the last two years,” Frazier said. “You just gotta be professional and play baseball. That’s it. Control what you can control, that’s playing the game.”