Loyal to a fault

Loyal to a fault

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010
3:19 PM

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

One of the frequent conversations that I will get into at the bar will involve who has the best fans. Since Im from Philadelphia, this conversation will usually start when one of my customers will tell me how horrible Philly fans are. Now I wont deny that some of my Philly brethren are knuckleheads, embarrassing actually, I just dont that think they should represent all of us thoughtful, handsome ones!

On-field tasings could happen anywhere, and for my money, should. (Wouldnt it have been great if the fatherson duo on the Southside had been dropped on the spot when they attacked the Kansas City 1st base coach? And before I hear too much crowing from the other side of town about Sox fans, let us remember that these morons spent their afternoon at Wrigley.)

My point is that ANY fan base has its issues. I just dont think that a group should be identified by a misguided few, no matter how entertaining it makes a verbal beat-down at the bar. The talk at the bar these days, seems to be a lot about baseball fans. In this town there has always been the argument about Cubs fans, and how loyal and devoted (read: better) they are because they always fill up Wrigley Field. My point has been that they might be just the opposite, although with all of the empty seats there this month, maybe not.

This is the only way that a fan has to show their displeasure, but not showing up. Now all empty seats are not created equal and should not be viewed that way. Atlanta Braves fans not showing up for playoff games has long been a joke and bringing it up is an easy way to tick one of them off! The view of outsiders, especially from the Northside, being that after 14 consecutive playoff appearances, Braves fans are jaded, and dont appreciate what they have. How about ticket prices for playoff games are jacked up, and for those 14 appearances, the Braves only have one title to show for it? Thats a lot of disappointing traffic jams on the way home. (Have you ever driven in or around Atlanta? Ouch!)

This year, there are two fan bases on opposite sides of the spectrum. Philly fans are being lauded for selling out (45,310!) Citizens Bank Park a record 122 in a row to watch their Fightins and in Tampa Bay, they cant get over 8,000 to watch the most exciting young team in baseball clinch a playoff berth, prompting star 3rd baseman Evan Longoria to publicly call it embarrassing. As far as what Longoria says, I agree. But that being said, what do you expect? Tampa is not a major market, there are many other options there for one to entertain themselves, and oh by the way, they play in the worst ballpark ever built. EVER! This is not the first time that the Rays are being thought of as a joke franchise and wont be the last, off the field that is. On the field, for right now, theyre about as good as it gets. Until, that is, they cant afford to pay all of their great young talent, and they all leave to play for real teams. In Philly is where one of the great National League teams of any generation performs and the locals have suffered through so much, (In EVERY sport!) that they cant get enough. But, speaking as a Phillies fan, just because the stadium is full every night doesnt mean that the fans are better, theyre just enjoying it more. Its the chicken-egg thing. If a team is good, they will come, if it is bad, they will not.

I think the fact of whether fans go to the ballpark, most times, is a measure of a product on the field. As consumers, we all have choices. My choice is that I can afford to spend the 500 it takes to take my family of 5 to a ballgame maybe once a year. Something that would sway my decision to go more, or less, would be the value I get for that expenditure. Everything is more fun, or can be rationalized to the Boss, when you win. Does that make me less of a fan? I read about the team every day. I watch EVERY game on TV. The games outcome, sometimes, can affect my mood. Im a die-hard! But, just because I would make a monetary decision, based on several factors, like say the convenience of only having to wait in line for the bathroom at my house for 10 minutes, doesnt mean I dont care. There are many ways to judge how much a person cares for something or how much that thing means to them. In todays electronic age of being a fan, I dont think attendance is the only one. Having a team become very good and then be adored by the local populace, doesnt mean that the fans are all front-runners. It could mean that the following of that team is just, finally, getting some reward for their investment. And I dont see anything wrong with that. Am I right Blackhawk fans?

Brent Seabrook could return, but Jonathan Toews will miss ninth straight when Blackhawks play Stars

Brent Seabrook could return, but Jonathan Toews will miss ninth straight when Blackhawks play Stars

Brent Seabrook might be an option, but Jonathan Toews will miss his ninth consecutive game when the Blackhawks take on the Dallas Stars on Sunday night at the United Center.

Seabrook suffered an upper-body injury against the Arizona Coyotes on Tuesday night. He did not play Friday when the Blackhawks lost 1-0 to the New York Rangers in overtime. Seabrook practiced on Saturday, but coach Joel Quenneville said he'll see how Seabrook feels on Sunday morning before seeing if the defenseman can play.

Toews has skated with the team just once since suffering his back injury against the San Jose Sharks on Nov. 23. That was on Dec. 2; Toews skated mainly on his own that day before joining the team for about 10 to 15 minutes of practice. But Toews has not been on the ice since, and coach Joel Quenneville said the Blackhawks won’t have a better idea of when Toews can return until he skates again.

Corey Crawford (appendectomy) did not practice.

Marian Hossa did not practice but was just taking a rest day. He’s expected to play Sunday. Same goes for Richard Panik, who also did not practice.

Scott Darling will start in net vs. the Stars.

Bill Dineen, father of Blackhawks assistant coach Kevin Dineen, died on Saturday morning. Kevin Dineen was not at practice.

Cincinnati hires Ohio State defensive coordinator Luke Fickell as new head coach

luke-fickell-1210.jpg
AP

Cincinnati hires Ohio State defensive coordinator Luke Fickell as new head coach

Urban Meyer has lost another coordinator to the head-coaching ranks.

After reports Friday that Ohio State defensive coordinator Luke Fickell was talking with Cincinnati about its vacant head-coaching job, the Bearcats announced Saturday that Fickell is the guy.

"It’s with much pride and humility that I accept the awesome honor of becoming the head coach at the University of Cincinnati," Fickell said in the announcement. "This city, this school and my family are all Ohio. It’s a tough, blue-collar state with hard-working, blue-collar people that respect an honest and complete effort. That’s what they will get from me personally and what they should expect from this football program. This team belongs to this city, and we will make you proud."

Fickell had been a mainstay at Ohio State. He played there in the mid-1990s and returned as a graduate assistant in 1999. After a two-year stint as the defensive line coach at Akron, he returns as an assistant on Jim Tressel's staff, the special teams coordinator on the Buckeyes' national championship team in 2002. He spent six seasons as a defensive coordinator before Tressel's tenure ended in tumultuous fashion amid the "Tattoogate" scandal, and it was Fickell who took over as interim head coach, helping to keep the program together during a 6-7 season before Meyer arrived in 2012. Fickell stayed on Meyer's staff and has served as a defensive coordinator under Meyer for the past five seasons as Ohio State has posted a stunning 61-5 record with a national championship win in 2014.

Fickell's track record has been terrific in recent seasons, coaching a Buckeyes defense that's ranked as one of the nation's best. Ohio State currently ranks third in the country in scoring defense, allowing an average of 14.2 points a game, and fourth in the country in total defense, allowing an average of 282.3 yards per game. The Buckeyes also rank fourth in the nation in interceptions, fifth in passing defense and fifth in red zone defense. In 2015, the Buckeyes were second in the nation in scoring defense and ninth in total defense.

Six defensive players from the 2015 Ohio State team were selected in this year's NFL Draft, including three in the first round.

Cincinnati fills a vacancy created when Tommy Tuberville departed earlier this month. Tuberville posted a 4-8 record last season. Fickell seems a perfect fit with the Bearcats, as he brings that one season of head-coaching experience and intimate knowledge of the recruiting area.

"We are excited to welcome Luke, his wife Amy and their family to Cincinnati," Cincinnati athletics director Mike Bohn said in the announcement. "We targeted a number of criteria we wanted in our head football coach, and we were looking for the coach who was the best fit for our program, our university and our community and we have found that leader in Luke Fickell. His extensive ties to the state of Ohio, experience at a championship-level program in Ohio State, ability to evaluate and develop talent, energy and leadership are all qualities which set him apart. Above all else, he's a model of integrity and a great family man, and we look forward to partnering with him to continue to build upon our winning tradition."

Fickell is the second defensive coordinator in as many years to depart Meyer's staff for a head-coaching job and the third coordinator overall in as many years. Chris Ash left to coach Rutgers last offseason, and Tom Herman left for the head-coaching job at Houston two offseasons ago. Herman is now the head coach at Texas.

And some fun scheduling coincidences: Not only does Fickell's new team face Michigan next season during non-conference play, but the Bearcats take on the Buckeyes in 2019.