Mark Sanchez can co-exist with Tim Tebow, right?


Mark Sanchez can co-exist with Tim Tebow, right?

From Comcast SportsNet
FLORHAM PARK, New Jersey (AP) -- The message was the same from the New York Jets' two quarterbacks: We can do this. And, not only that, Mark Sanchez and Tim Tebow think they're going to have lots of fun along the way. A brewing quarterback controversy? Not if you ask them. "I think we'll have a great working relationship," Tebow told the sea of reporters at his introductory news conference on Monday. "We talked about that, just supporting one another in our roles. I'm excited about that opportunity. I think we'll have a great relationship and hopefully we'll be able to thrive together." Sanchez, meanwhile, was nowhere near the Jets' packed practice facility. He was home in California -- and didn't even watch Tebow smile his way through his first New York close-up. "I heard he did a pretty good job," Sanchez said on a conference call five hours later. "How did he do?" Well, Tebow handled himself just fine in the spotlight, a situation Sanchez has been accustomed to during his first three NFL seasons. "As the quarterback of the Jets, I'm getting wins for this team," Sanchez said. "That's my primary focus. If Tim is going to help us win, I'm excited about that." They've known each other for a few years, and Sanchez even hosted Tebow at the University of Southern California on a recruiting trip. "He's a very classy person with a lot of integrity," Tebow said. "He's also fun to hang around. I think our quarterback room will be a lot of fun." Sanchez was equally as complimentary, dishing out the praise for his celebrity backup. "He's such a good guy, people don't want to believe it," Sanchez said. "There's no such thing as that good of a guy, but he is. He's a great guy, a great competitor, and he's going to make a great teammate." Both quarterbacks said all the right things about themselves, each other and the goal they share. "I would give my whole heart to be the best Jet I possibly can be," Tebow said, "and help this team win football games." Added Sanchez: "Our team goal is what's most important, and that's winning." Sure, it all sounds good, but is it realistic? Consider that Tebow is a confident and polished rock star who has been a winner on the field. Oh, and he walks in as the Jets' most popular player, thanks to a huge contingent of fans who have followed him from the University of Florida to the Denver Broncos and now to New York. "I really don't feel like it will be too much of a distraction because I honestly will try not to pay too much attention to it," Tebow said. "The reason we're doing this today is because I have bosses, too, and they wanted me to stand up and talk to all of you. I can blame it on them because they made me do it." He laughed a few times, grinned throughout and went out of his way to dismiss any speculation that this could be one potential sticky situation. But make no mistake: Tebow is a competitor whose desire is to be a starting quarterback in the NFL. His shortcomings are well-documented with his flawed mechanics, questionable decision-making and 46.5 percent completion rate last season. Tebow also has a resume filled with stirring comeback victories and a playoff win -- all last season with the Broncos. The game plan -- at least for now -- is to have Tebow serve as the backup to Sanchez, who coach Rex Ryan and general manager Mike Tannenbaum insist is the unquestioned starter. If Sanchez slips up or struggles, that's when the real test will be. After all, the Jets committed to Sanchez when they signed him to a three-year extension a little more than two weeks ago. Tebow is also going to have plenty of playing time, in all kinds of roles. And, if that comes from under center, that sounds good to him. "I think, first and foremost, I'm a football player first and then a quarterback, although that is my dream, that's what I want to be," he said. "But however I can help the team, however I can make a difference, however they can use me, I'll be open to it and work as hard as I can." Ryan has suggested that Tebow could see as many as 20 plays a game, a massive amount for a backup quarterback. That means Sanchez will have to head to the sideline for a good handful of those, and that's something that doesn't exactly excite him. But, also not looking to stir any controversy, Sanchez chose his words carefully. "It's well-documented that I'm not thrilled about playing wide receiver or coming off the field," he said. "But that's just how I'm programmed, and any quarterback is programmed like that. The way I feel about the wildcat really is secondary. I'm a team guy and I'll do whatever it takes to win. If changing a few things up a couple times a game is what we need to do, I'm totally on board."

Bill Murray makes Cubs address from the White House

Bill Murray makes Cubs address from the White House

Actor and longtime Cubs fan Bill Murray crashed the end of the White House briefing on Friday sporting Cubs attire after his team took a 3-2 lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series.

Asked whether he believes the Cubs will reach their first World Series berth since 1945, Murray responded: "I feel very confident that Clayton Kershaw is a great, great pitcher, but we (Cubs) got too many sticks."

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Earlier in the day, he briefly met with President Barack Obama, a noted White Sox fan, to congratulate Murray on being the recipient of the 2016 Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

Murray will be honored on Sunday, but the problem is, it may interfere with Game 7 of the NLCS if the Dodgers beat the Cubs on Saturday night.

Murray will surely be cheering the loudest for the Cubs in Game 6 to avoid that conflict.

Check out the video here.

For Bears QB Jay Cutler, an unwanted second chance – audition? – presents itself

For Bears QB Jay Cutler, an unwanted second chance – audition? – presents itself

Some decisions have ways of simply making themselves. Decisions like, say, who will be the starting quarterback for the Chicago Bears.

Regrettably, one aspect of that decision was made for the Bears when Brian Hoyer went down with a broken left arm in the second quarter of Thursday’s 26-10 loss to the Green Bay Packers. At that moment the Hoyer-or-Cutler question was rendered moot. As FOX’s Jay Glazer had reported, the No. 1 job was Hoyer’s to lose, and the injury unfortunately took care of that. Coaches never had to make that decision.

This is clearly not the way Cutler would like to have been returned to his job. No player is pleased to have an opportunity made possible by a catastrophic injury to a teammate.

Bigger picture: The 2016 season was always a prove-it year for Jay Cutler, more so than even last year because of guaranteed money, which is now gone. The rest of the 2016 now becomes a condensed prove-it crucible, where Cutler is playing for his job in Chicago or his next team. His price for 2017 ($15 million) is modest by starter standards, but so is his resume.

Without a strong final nine games, assuming his injured thumb is sufficiently recovered after nearly six weeks off, Cutler may find himself as next offseason’s Ryan Fitzpatrick, sort-of wanted by a team but for money nowhere close to the value he and his agent had in mind.

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The play of rookies Dak Presott in Dallas and Carson Wentz in Philadelphia will reinforce the message that you can start and win with a rookie right away, which projects to depress any Cutler market. Why pay a marginal veteran, which Cutler has been and certainly is at this point and age (34 next April), when a rookie can be had at a fraction of the cost?

Without a massive contract renegotiation, a scenario of Cutler staying on as a bridge to a young successor is beyond a longshot. Hoyer, far more likely to fit that role, and his price will not approach Cutler’s.

Cutler now has his second chance. Whether he likes it or not, it’s an audition.