Mattio recalls memories of 36-year coaching career

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Mattio recalls memories of 36-year coaching career

Dave Mattio and Jerry Colangelo both grew up in the Italian neighborhood known as Hungry Hill in Chicago Heights. Colangelo and most of his friends went on to be standouts in football, basketball, baseball and track and field at Bloom Township. To this day, Mattio can't understand why he ended up at Marian Catholic.

"I have no idea why I came here," Mattio said. "Colangelo grew up on 22nd and Union. I grew up on 25th and Butler. My mom and dad said a new school had opened up. We went to an open house and I was here."

Mattio never left. Because his grammar school didn't offer football, he was talked into playing football as a freshman. As a junior and senior, he was a two-way lineman under coach Tom Mitchell, who went on to a storied career at Brother Rice.

A 1966 graduate, he earned a football scholarship to Northern Illinois but blew out his knee in the last practice as a freshman. He graduated in 1971, obtained a masters degree in physical education and returned to Marian Catholic as a physical education, health and history teacher and coach in three sports.

When Don Berg left in 1975, Mattio became athletic director. The following year, when Don Voss left for Lockport, he became head football coach. He will continue to serve his alma mater as athletic director but, after 36 years, he has decided to retire from coaching.

"It's time," he said. "I've been thinking about it for a couple of years. I've always believed you are either part of the solution or part of the problem or you are the problem. A lot of things have changed here. Numbers are down, private school enrollment is declining and we're not getting the volume of kids we used to get."

Mattio will be 65 at the start of the 2013 football season. He has 14 grandchildren. He saw two of them play football last week. One is a cheerleader. Another plays hockey. He said he just realized he has been married for 40 years. His wife Jody is a candidate for sainthood.

"It took a long time to build this program up to where we were competitive state-wide," he said. "But in the last nine years things have gone in the opposite direction on my watch.

"When you have a program and a school and kids at heart, you reach a point where it is time to cut your ties and support someone else to come in with a fresh outlook and energy and new ideas. It is frustrating when it is an obsession and whatever magic you had doesn't work any longer."

In 36 years, Mattio's teams posted a 251-141 record. He produced 22 winning teams in a row and guided 20 teams to the state playoff. His 1993 team, led by Terence Marable, Jerry Verde, Mark Clifford, Brian Kochanski and Brian VanderLuigaren, went 14-0 and defeated Geneseo 13-6 for the Class 4A championship. His 1999 team finished second.

He sent four players to the NFL--Dennis Kelly, John Holecek, Rodney Harrison and Mike Prior. He still describes Harrison as "the best football player I coached," Holecek as "the most unsung player I coached" and Prior as "the best all-around athlete I coached."

Mattio also produced several other outstanding players who had the capability of succeeding at the college level but, due to various reasons, didn't achieve their potential. Most noteworthy were Marable and Roderick Middleton, a free safety on the 1999 state runner-up.
 
Marable, an All-Stater, went to Illinois and played several positions on offense, defense and special teams. Unfortunately, he was an I-back at a time when one-back schemes were becoming popular. He never found a niche. Mattio insists Middleton "would have been a great NFL free safety" but he suffered a back injury. His first love was basketball, which he played in college and overseas.

But in the last nine years, Marian Catholic was 37-50, including 1-8 in his last season in which Mattio went through four quarterbacks, a number of running backs, was forced to play many kids both ways and usually wore down in the second half.

"It was disappointing from the standpoint that the kids worked harder than a 1-8 team," Mattio said. "I'm proud of how they played. I can't put a finger on the won-lost issue. The important part is our kids played hard through it all and performed in the last nine years. We worked harder as a staff as ever before but the results weren't as proficient as before 2000."

The decline can be traced to many issues. Marian Catholic, which opened in 1958, used to have as many as 15 or 16 parish programs that fed the school. Now there are only three. This year's freshman and sophomore teams were both 0-9.

"On seven of the last nine Sundays, I watched grade schools play on our field and I wondered how many of those kids wanted to play here," Mattio said.

As athletic director, he will help to rebuild the program and rekindle interest among alumni. There are new projects--the school's website, more bleacher seating, a new pressbox. He doesn't fish or golf or hunt but has a passion for collecting football and baseball cards. What will you give him for a Sibby Sisti or a Yogi Berra 1959 card or a Hank Aaron 1960?

He coached son Jamie in 1989 and son Josh in 1991. He is proud of former players and assistants who have gone on to achieve success as head coaches at other schools--Jerry Verde, John Holecek, Mike Romeli, Ron Butschle, Josh Howe and Nick Novak. He misses Bob Bergstrom and Ron Guagenti, who retired after 30 years on his staff.

He'll remember beating Joliet Catholic and Rick Thayer 16-6 in his first season, losing to Joliet Catholic in the Prep Bowl in 1979, winning 12 in a row before losing to Belleville Althoff in the semifinals in 1980, finishing 8-1 in 1981 and, of course, the state championship in 1993. Last March, the team was inducted into the East Suburban Catholic's Hall of Fame.

"I'm thankful to my wife for allowing me to be a kid chasing my dreams all these years," Mattio said. "I have been blessed to work with a lot of great people."

Hawkeyes going to Outback Bowl for fifth time, taking on Florida

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Hawkeyes going to Outback Bowl for fifth time, taking on Florida

Iowa is going back to the Outback Bowl.

Yes, for the fifth time in the last 13 seasons, the Hawkeyes will wrap their campaign with a trip to Tampa and an appearance in the Outback Bowl. And for the third time, their opponent there will be the Florida Gators. That game kicks at noon on Jan. 2.

Iowa and Florida met in the Outback Bowl to conclude the 2003 and 2005 seasons, splitting those two matchups.

This time around, the Hawkeyes are coming off an 8-4 regular season, a disappointing follow up to their 12-2 campaign a season ago that started off a perfect 12-0 before postseason losses in the Big Ten title game and the Rose Bowl.

Kirk Ferentz has led his team to a bowl appearance in 14 of his 18 seasons, though Iowa has lost the last four of those games, without a bowl win since taking down Missouri in the 2010 Insight Bowl.

Iowa is 2-2 in its four previous Outback Bowl appearances, beating Florida, losing to Florida, beating South Carolina and losing to LSU.

As for the Gators, they own an 8-4 record, as well, after falling to Alabama in Saturday’s SEC Championship Game. Florida is known for its sluggish offense, one of the lowest-scoring teams in the country.

Start spreadin' the news: Northwestern to face Pitt in Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium

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Start spreadin' the news: Northwestern to face Pitt in Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium

Start spreadin' the news.

Northwestern is heading to New York for its bowl game this season, specifically the Bronx, where it will battle Pittsburgh in the Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium.

Though it isn't your typically warm bowl destination, the baseball-stadium setting should be pretty fantastic. The game will be played at 1 p.m. on Dec. 28.

The Wildcats reached bowl eligibility with their sixth win in the regular-season finale against Illinois. Northwestern is heading to back-to-back bowl games after missing out on the postseason in back-to-back seasons in 2013 and 2014.

This is just the 13th-ever bowl trip for the Cats, though it's their seventh in 11 seasons under Pat Fitzgerald. Northwestern has a 1-5 record under Fitzgerald in the previous six bowl games, though that win is one of just two all-time bowl victories by the program.

This season started slowly for the Cats, who lost upsetting home games to Illinois State and Western Michigan and started 1-3. But Northwestern turned things around with back-to-back road wins over Iowa and Michigan State and finished 6-6. The Cats' offense has been particularly effective this season compared to seasons past. Wide receiver Austin Carr took home Big Ten Receiver of the Year honors and is a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award after leading the conference in receptions, receiving yards and touchdown catches. Running back Justin Jackson was the league's leading rusher until getting surpassed by just a couple yards by both Wisconsin's Corey Clement and Penn State's Saquon Barkley, who both competed in Saturday night's Big Ten Championship Game, adding to their respective rushing totals.

Pitt has had a pretty noteworthy season. Despite having four losses, it beat two teams that finished ranked in the top five of the College Football Playoff rankings: No. 2 Clemson and No. 5 Penn State. The Panthers are coached by former Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi.