Montini aims for fourth in a row


Montini aims for fourth in a row

As he packed his bags for his annual fishing excursion to his favorite hideaway in Canada, Montini football coach Chris Andriano was reminded about the past, the present and the future. Even the thought of a Walleye tugging on the end of a lure couldn't change that.

"Retirement? I'm getting close. I retired from teaching this year. I've got a plan for three more years," said the 60-year-old Andriano. "If my health is good and they want me to stick around...we'll see. I'll re-evaluate after three years. But my grandchildren are getting to the point of being more active. I want to watch them do things."

Andriano insists he has no goals left to achieve, no more worlds to conquer. "I've accomplished everything I could possibly think of," he said.

Or has he?

In his 33-year career, Andriano has posted a 244-117 record, a winning percentage of .676. He has produced four state championship teams--2004, 2009, 2010, 2011.

If he wins another title in 2012, he would equal the achievements of three legendary coaches who won four state titles in a row--Joliet Catholic's Gordie Gillespie in 1975-78, Mount Carmel's Frank Lenti in 1988-91 and Providence's Matt Senffner in 1994-97.

Andriano is cautiously optimistic about his 2012 squad. How do you replace Jordan Westerkamp, the sensational wide receiver who has taken his record-breaking act to Nebraska? How do you improve on last year's 70-45 victory over Joliet Catholic in the Class 5A final?

And how about this? Despite all of his success--he is 45-9 in the last four years--he never has coached an unbeaten team.

"Will this be my best team ever?" Andriano said. "It is to be determined. It will be pretty hard to top the last few years in certain ways. This is a very good team overall. We're planning on a deep playoff run. We have good leadership, overall athleticism, very good athletes at all positions and a very good group of linemen.

"But I don't think of winning four in a row. We just want to prepare these kids for what they will see, a target on everybody's schedule. We try to look at things in the short term. You can't be looking too far ahead. Four in a row would be awesome. But it would be about a lot of people."

It will start out with a bang on Aug. 24. Montini will open at Palatine, Andriano's alma mater. On that night, Palatine will induct Andriano into its Hall of Fame.

So how did he approach his players on Wednesday, the first day of practice?

"The first thing we talk about is being in shape and mentally ready and prepared to play 14 games," Andriano said. "We want to practice on Thanksgiving Day and play on the final weekend.

"It is a process. It is a lot of hard work. A lot has already gone into this. We have the right ingredients to make it happen. Our philosophy always is the same--do your best."

Andriano credits offensive coordinator Lewis Borsellino for much of the success. A graduate of Montini and a former assistant at Maine South, Borsellino joined Andriano's staff five years ago and brought Maine South's high-powered offense with him. "Look at the results. We put points on the board," Andriano said.

Football has become a monster at the Lombard uniforms for this season, a 3,000-seat playing facility with artificial turf for the second year, lights for the third year. "There is an air of excitement for the football program," Andriano said.

In Westerkamp's absence, the leader of the 2012 squad will be Joey Borsellino, Lewis' son and the eighth Borsellino to play for Andriano. The senior wide receiver brings an intensity and love for the game that Andriano had as a high school star. Last year, he caught 70 passes for 1,000 yards and 10 touchdowns.

"He is Montini. He lives and eats and breathes Montini, like Westerkamp," Andriano said about the youngster. "He is demanding. He understands what it takes to win."

The line features 6-foot-4, 290-pound guard Tate Briggs, 6-foot-3, 255-pound end Fred Beaugard and 6-foot-6, 260-pound junior end Dylan Thompson, whom Andriano describes as one of the leading underclass linemen in the Chicago area.

Tailback Dimitri Taylor, a 5-foot-10, 185-pound senior, rushed for over 1,000 yards last year. He is being recruited by Eastern Illinois and Illinois State. With Taylor's experience and athleticism, the running game can be expected to be a bigger part of Montini's offense in 2012.

Others to watch are senior wide receiver Mark Gorogianis and kickerpunter Andrew Harte, described as "the best kicker I have had" by Andriano.

Andriano has produced a string of gifted quarterbacks in recent years, all of whom scared the daylights out of opposing secondaries. But this is a rare occasion when he goes into preseason practice without knowing who his starting quarterback is. He insists that will change very quickly.

The job will be given to junior Jimmy Barron, a transfer from Wheaton Warrenville South who was the starter on the sophomore squad last year, or junior Alex Wills, who was the backup on the sophomore squad last year.

"It is pretty even. They battled all summer. But I'm looking to make a decision in the first week of practice," Andriano said. "We don't have a Division I quarterback. We won't throw as much this year, especially early. But I am confident one of them will take charge. We must do a good job of teaching the quarterback to handle the ball and not turn it over."

The names may be different. But the game is the same. So is the philosophy.

"We've been through this. We know what we are doing," Andriano said. "When you are in it long enough, you learn what you have to do to get ready and what to prepare for. We have learned a process or system of preparing for games. Our kids are very well prepared."

Why to watch: Naperville North vs. Lyons Township Tale of the Tape

Why to watch: Naperville North vs. Lyons Township Tale of the Tape

Matchup: No. 19 Lyons Township (7-2) at No. 14 Naperville North (8-1)

Where to watch: Live broadcast on CSN at 7 p.m., plus a live stream available on and the NBC Sports app.

Overview: This Class 8A showdown features teams from two of the top largest public school conferences in Illinois. Lyons Township and head coach Kurt Weinberg fired off six straight wins to start the 2016 season (including an impressive, 28-14, road win over Glenbard West) before dropping two straight games in Weeks 7 and 8 to Hinsdale Central (28-21) and Oak Park-River Forest (27-3). Naperville North and head coach Sean Drendel posted a 2-7 record last season. However, the Huskies welcomed back 18 returning starters this fall. The Huskies only loss this season was to Neuqua Valley (35-20) back in Week 6.

When Lyons Township has the football: The Lions will look to expand the field with both the pass and run, via its no-huddle shotgun spread offense. Junior quarterback Ben Bryant is already drawing FBS scholarship offers and has several weapons including senior wide receiver Hasahn Austin, junior wide receiver Nate Rusk and junior running back Reggie Terrell Jr. Lyons Township also features a big offensive line. 

[MORE PREPS: IHSA Football Playoffs First-Round Matchups]

When Naperville North has the football: The Huskies will look to establish thunder and lightning in the backfield with senior running backs Cross Robinson and Eric Wright. Then, mix in Naperville North's play-action passing game, led by senior quarterback Luke Cegles, junior wide receiver Nick Calcagno and senior wide receiver Mitch Lewis (6-foot-6, 220 pounds). North also has a good size and experience on the offensive line.

Key matchups to watch: The Naperville North offensive line vs. the Lyons Township defensive line. Naperville North wants to run the ball and also control the clock. The Lions defensive line is very good. Keep an eye on senior Andrew Ezell and junior Mickey Brown. Also, how well can the Naperville North secondary handle the spread passing attack from Lyons? Naperville North has an experienced secondary, led by seniors Cam Hardy and Grant Ericksen. This group will be tested by a speedy group of Lyons receivers and backs..

Impact player for Lyons Township: Bryant. He is an experienced signal-caller who can take over a game when he's on.

Impact players for Naperville North: Robinson and Wright. The Huskies backfield has been special. according to those in and around the Huskies program.

Prediction: Naperville North 28, Lyons Township 21. The keys here will be (1) time of possession for Naperville North and (2) which team wins the turnover battle. I fully expect this to be a close game from start to finish, but I'll give the nod to the home team here. 

In Game 1, Jon Lester doesn't quite live up to his World Series reputation: 'We got a long ways to go'

In Game 1, Jon Lester doesn't quite live up to his World Series reputation: 'We got a long ways to go'

CLEVELAND – While the Cubs came into this World Series as the heavy favorites, the team with the global following and baseball’s best roster on paper, Jon Lester understood the challenge ahead. The Cleveland Indians would counter with their own Game 1 ace, a dynamic reliever changing the way we think about bullpens and a future Hall of Fame manager.

That’s how it played out in a 6-0 game that felt a lot closer, Corey Kluber pitching like a Cy Young Award winner, Andrew Miller handling the seventh and eighth innings and Terry Francona improving his record to 9-0 in World Series games.     

Welcome to “Believeland,” where the Fourth Street bars on Tuesday were buzzing more than seven hours before first pitch. That night, LeBron James and the Cavaliers would get their championship rings and watch the banner-raising ceremony at Quicken Loans Arena, just up the street from Progressive Field.

By the first inning – when pitching coach Chris Bosio had to walk out to the mound to talk to Lester – the red video ribbons lining the stadium said: “CLEVELAND AGAINST THE WORLD.” With the bases loaded, Lester had just drilled Brandon Guyer with a pitch, forcing in a second run, a sequence set in motion by walks to Mike Napoli and Carlos Santana and Jose Ramirez’s soft infield single up the third-base line.

It didn’t matter that Lester would eventually settle down and pretty much control this Cleveland lineup. (Except for that rocket Roberto Perez launched off the left-field railing for a solo homer and a 3-0 lead in the fourth inning.) Or that the Indians didn’t run all over the bases, with Francisco Lindor going 1-for-2 in stolen bases. (“Whatever, it’s happened all year," Lester said.)

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This is Cleveland’s blueprint for October, maybe its only chance to win its first World Series since 1948.

“It’s always important (to get a lead), no matter what time of year it is,” Lester said. “It makes a manager’s job a lot easier. It makes your job a lot easier. When you give a guy like Kluber – who’s locked in from pitch one – two runs in the first, it makes his job a lot easier. I know the feeling on the other side. You’re just able to attack differently.

“With the bullpens and all that stuff that they’re setting up nowadays, all you got to do is get through six.”

Lester kept it a 3-0 game, but didn’t finish the sixth inning, a rare October night where he didn’t seem to be automatic. Until Tuesday night, he had gone 3-0 in three World Series starts, allowing only one earned run in 21 innings.

Lester won his two World Series rings with the Boston Red Sox, overlapping with Francona and Miller at different points. This is why the Cubs gave Lester a $155 million contract, to set the tone on the mound and within the clubhouse.

Near the end of a 103-win regular season – and even after winning the franchise’s first pennant in 71 years – Lester has offered colorful versions of: We haven’t done anything yet.

But Lester – the National League Championship Series co-MVP after putting up a 1.38 ERA against the Los Angeles Dodgers and watching the Cubs win both of those starts – also doesn’t do overreactions to losses.

“We got a long ways to go,” Lester said. “If we win tomorrow, we’re right back in it. Just like LA – everybody counted us out after Game 3. They said we were the worst best team in baseball. We’re here. We’re not giving up.

“I know my guys. I know my team. And I know that nobody in this clubhouse is giving anything up.”