New Caps coach only owns 1 suit?

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New Caps coach only owns 1 suit?

From Comcast SportsNetWASHINGTON (AP) -- Dale Hunter made his Washington Capitals coaching debut in a blue suit. He had to. "It's the only one I got," he said. Hunter was behind the bench on the NHL level for the first time Tuesday night as the Capitals lost 2-1 to the St. Louis Blues. He was tabbed as the replacement for Bruce Boudreau, who was fired Monday. "I definitely have butterflies going," Hunter said before the game. "It's like the first game when you get traded." Hunter played 19 seasons in the NHL and spent the past 11 years coaching the London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League, where he wore the same suit every game. He said he plans to continue the ritual with the Capitals. "I only have to wear it two hours and a half every game," he said. So how often does he go to the dry cleaners? "I go after every game," he said with a laugh, "unless it's back-to-back." As he spoke, Hunter wore a lime green tie with blue and white diagonal stripes. Surely he must have another one, right? "Nope," he said. "Same one." Well, not quite. During the game, he sported a red tie. In contrast to his noted intensity as a player -- Hunter ranks second all time in NHL history in penalty minutes -- Hunter's meeting with reporters two hours prior to faceoff turned into a pretty good stand-up routine. Asked what has surprised him the most in the two days he's held the job, he looked back at the throng and said: "You guys." "There used to be three people here," said Hunter, recalling the sometimes scant media attention the team received when he played here from 1987-99. "That's good for the area. That's how much the Caps have won, and fans are following them and you guys are following them. That's awesome." Hunter had a reputation for playing locker room practical jokes during his playing days, but he says that's behind him -- for the most part. "I grew up," the 51-year-old Hunter said. "I'm a coach now. I don't do it to players. I might do it to coaching staff." Expect Hunter to be demanding when it counts as he handles the reins of a team that was failing to meet high expectations. "I have as a player been through some coaching changes, and it does give you a lift," he said. "It's all new. You've got a clean slate again. ... I'm an emotional guy. We're in the trenches together, the coaches and the players, and it's up to us to win."

Jerry Reinsdorf, Frank Thomas congratulate Tim Raines on Baseball Hall of Fame election

Jerry Reinsdorf, Frank Thomas congratulate Tim Raines on Baseball Hall of Fame election

Tim Raines became the 39th former member of the White Sox to be elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday.

White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf released a statement congratulating Raines on his election.

“On behalf of the entire White Sox organization and our fans, I want to sincerely congratulate Tim on today’s election to the Hall of the Fame, the highest and greatest honor bestowed upon a baseball player,” said Jerry Reinsdorf, chairman of the Chicago White Sox. “He played a crucial role on the 1993 division championship team, was a key member of the 2005 World Series-winning coaching staff and provided Sox fans with great memories that will not be forgotten.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

Frank Thomas, who played with Raines from 1991-95, had high praise for his former teammate.

“Rock was one of my favorite teammates ever,” said Hall-of-Famer and White Sox legend Frank Thomas. “He made the game fun night-to-night and was a great leader in the clubhouse. His humor and hustle always brought the team closer. I’m so glad this has finally happened for one of my favorite people ever.”

Thomas also went on Twitter to express his excitement for Raines heading to Cooperstown.

Bulls Talk Podcast: What went wrong for the Bulls against the Mavericks?

Bulls Talk Podcast: What went wrong for the Bulls against the Mavericks?

In the latest edition of the Bulls Talk Podcast, Mark Schanowski, Kendall Gill and Justin O'Neil assess what went wrong for the Bulls in their Tuesday-night loss to the Mavericks and wonder why the Bulls struggle against good teams but win against the league's top teams.

Also, the guys discuss whether the Bulls are over reliant on isolation plays for Jimmy Butler and Dwayne Wade in the fourth quarter. And, Robin Lopez says he might start taking 3-pointers. What does Kendall think about the new era of the stretch five?

Plus, Kendall shares which NBA city was the biggest road party scene, and the guys discuss the possible comeback of Ben Gordon.