No separation in Notre Dame quarterback battle

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No separation in Notre Dame quarterback battle

SOUTH BEND -- Everett Golson has thought about the scene. A packed Aviva Stadium in Dublin, Ireland on Sept. 1, trotting out for Notre Dame's first offensive possession of the season as the team's starting quarterback.

"Honestly, I've had dreams about it, kinda seeing visions of it," Golson said after practice Wednesday, Notre Dame's fifth of fall camp. "Me being out there, the crowd and everything. But that's what motivates me just to keep going, keep driving and learn as much as I can."

With junior Tommy Rees suspended for the Navy game, whoever takes the ball for Notre Dame in just over three weeks will be inexperienced. Andrew Hendrix has in-game experience at the NCAA level, but it's limited, and Golson has never taken a snap in a college game.

Less than a week into camp, the Irish quarterback battle has been defined as Hendrix against Golson -- both players have been splitting reps with the first and second team, while freshman Gunner Kiel has seen limited reps, coming exclusively with the third team.

While it seemed as if Golson took more first-team reps in Wednesday's practice, Notre Dame players and coaches dismissed anything but a 50-50 split in reps between Golson and Hendrix. But even if the first-team reps lean toward one player, Hendrix doesn't see it as a roadblock to the other earning the starting job.

"It's the same work you get with the ones and the twos, I think, because it's the same reads and the timing's almost the same," Hendrix said. "Really, it's when you're in, focusing on the defense and just making the right reads off that."

Kiel, a true freshman who came to Notre Dame a semester early, didn't appear too bothered by his likely No. 3 spot on the depth chart.

"Whatever the coaches want me to do, that's all I can say," Kiel said. "They're there, and they're going to teach us. If Andrew and Everett are going to get more reps than I am, that's fine. I'm going to be the best player I'm going to be for the team and do whatever I can to make the team better."

After a turnover-plagued 2011, limiting mistakes has been the mantra from head coach Brian Kelly and first-year offensive coordinator Chuck Martin since the beginning of spring camp. While Kelly preached attention to detail and zero as a positive play last year, those talking points never materialized into results.

But it's a new year, and Notre Dame's quarterbacks don't expect the same issues to pop back up.

"Our team is so good around us, the quarterback position, we don't have to win the games, we just have to get the ball to our horses and let the playmakers do their job and just minimize mistakes," Hendrix said. "We moved backwards sometimes last year, and as long as we're always moving forward, never having negatives plays, we're going to be a very good football team."

Both Hendrix and Golson aren't getting caught up in their position in the competition, which has been labeled as 1A and 1B early in camp. There's still plenty of time for separation, but until a starter is named, neither are paying much attention to what their standing may be, or what others are saying their standing may be.

"I try to stay as far away from that as possible," Golson said. "You don't really want to get too high, you don't want to get too low. You have to keep that medium. The best way to do that is to stay away from it and let people just talk."

But there does exist the possibility that either Golson or Hendrix won't be named the starter for the Navy game. And that's not anything against them -- instead, if there's no separation between the two, both could receive their fair share of playing time in the season opener.

"We'll know if we get to game time that both of them have to play," Kelly said. "Obviously they both have ability to be starters. I can't say that I wouldn't be comfortable. I'd prefer one quarterback, but at least I have some experience in balancing two if we ever have to do that. "

While there appears to be some genuine camaraderie between Golson, Hendrix, Kiel and Rees -- whose fellow quarterbacks have lauded for his attitude while not taking any reps, at least in Wednesday's practice -- at the end of the day, it's a competition, and most likely one player will emerge at the end.

"I really just focus on myself. That's the only way you can focus on it," Hendrix said. "I think you just gotta keep your own head down, keep chopping wood and at the end of the day, coach Kelly's going to make the decision that's best for the football team. I can only control what I do, and that's all I focus on."

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bulls build around All-Star Jimmy Butler?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bulls build around All-Star Jimmy Butler?

David Haugh (Chicago Tribune) and Ben Finfer (ESPN 1000) join Kap on the panel. Jimmy Butler is an All-Star starter. Is he a superstar now meaning the Bulls have to build around him? The guys pose that question to Bulls great Horace Grant.

The Raiders want to move to Las Vegas. If your NFL team moved, should you keep rooting for them? Plus should the Cubs help Sammy Sosa out as his Hall of Fame chances get smaller?

Check out the SportsTalk Live Podcast below.

NBA Buzz: Chris Paul hurt, the Bad Boy Warriors and some bummer draft news for the Bulls

NBA Buzz: Chris Paul hurt, the Bad Boy Warriors and some bummer draft news for the Bulls

It's become the newest trend in the NBA. Players 6-foot-10 and taller wandering out to the 3-point line to launch jump shots (or set shots), hoping to draw their defenders out of the paint.

Yes, we know the NBA has become a 3-point shooting league thanks to the long-range talents of players like Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, James Harden, J.J. Redick and Damian Lillard. Advanced analytics have shown coaches and front-office executives the value of that extra point from beyond the arc, and every team is working to develop 3-point shooting range with just about all the players on their rosters, including 7-foot centers.

Robin Lopez has been watching his twin brother Brook join the 3-point craze. Brook had only launched 31 shots from 3-point range in his previous eight NBA seasons, but this season he's put up 191 3s heading into play on Thursday and made 66 for a more than respectable 34.6-percent success rate.

Naturally, Robin says he can do anything his twin brother can do and told reporters it's only a matter of time before he gets the green light to shoot the 3 ball.

"It's something I've been working on this season. I don't know if it's game-ready yet, maybe that's a little more of a confidence issue. Coach Pete (Myers) has me shooting corner 3s before games. The way the NBA is going, I don't see why not. If Brook can do it, I can definitely do it."

Taj Gibson knocked down a corner 3 against the Wizards last week and said the coaching staff is encouraging him to shoot more of them in games. Gibson spent time after practice on Thursday working on his long-range shooting with assistant coach Mike Wilhelm, then told reporters, "I try to take two a game, but when you get out there, you don't really realize how far it is until you're lined up and the crowd is yelling 'shoot it, shoot it.' Your teammates are behind you. It's fun. I hopefully look forward to finally make some in the future."

Gibson added his 3-point shooting has already become a big topic of conversation around the team.

"My teammates are making little jokes about what I'm going to do when I make it. You gotta make some kind of signal or something. But one day at a time."

In case you haven't noticed, some of the best young big men in the game like Joel Embiid, Karl-Anthony Towns and DeMarcus Cousins have made the 3-point shot a staple in their offensive arsenals. And Robin Lopez says there's no reason why centers shouldn't expand their games behind traditional low post battles.

"I think it's wonderful for the game. I think there's a real premium on skill at all positions on the court. I think that's really going to continue. You're going to have more versatile big men."

Fred Hoiberg joked with reporters he might have to call a play to get Robin a 3-point try down the line, but he understands the value of having power forwards and centers who can shoot from long range.

"It's obviously a huge part of today's game. The 3-point shot, having multiple player that can stretch the floor. Those teams are really hard to guard."

So, with the Bulls currently ranking dead last in the NBA in 3-point shooting at just under 32 percent, Hoiberg is searching for more options, even among the tallest players on his roster.

Here are a few stories from around the Association that have caught my attention.

Paul's injury big trouble for Clippers

Bad news for the L.A. Clippers, who will have to get along for the next six to eight weeks without floor leader Chris Paul, who tore a ligament in his left thumb defending Russell Westbrook on Monday. Just the latest in a series of untimely injuries for Doc Rivers' team.

The good news? Paul will be healed in time for the playoffs, and the Clippers do have a deep group of veteran guards, including the aforementioned Redick, Raymond Felton, Jamal Crawford and Austin Rivers. But with Blake Griffin already on the sidelines recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery, the Clippers could have a tough time holding off Utah, Memphis and Oklahoma City in the race for home-court advantage in the opening round of the playoffs.

The larger question involves the direction of the franchise going forward. Under terms of the new CBA, Paul is eligible to sign a five-year contract this summer in excess of $200 million, while Griffin is also set to sign a new max deal. Will the Clippers tie up their payroll for years to come around the talented but oft-injured duo? Or are they better off cutting ties with at least one of their All Stars to keep some degree of cap flexibility going forward?

Since Rivers is the coach and president of basketball operations, that decision will largely be his to make in consultation with deep-pocketed owner Steve Ballmer.

Melo wants to stay in New York?

Speaking of franchise direction, what's next for the floundering Knicks, who've sunk to 11th place in a weak Eastern Conference?

Carmelo Anthony met with team president Phil Jackson earlier this week to clear the air about an article written by Jackson confidante Charley Rosen that suggested Anthony has perhaps outlived his usefulness in New York and that the Knicks should consider trading him. Anthony reaffirmed to Jackson he wants to stay and win in New York and that he has no intention to waive his no-trade clause.

So for now the uneasy alliance between Anthony and Jackson will continue, but the Knicks will be hamstrung by the Melo and Joakim Noah contracts for the next few years, likely preventing them from making any major moves to improve the roster.

Sixers reaping rewards of The Process

At the other end of the spectrum is the Philadelphia 76ers, who are finally starting to reap the benefits of acquiring so many high draft picks in recent years. Joel Embiid is already a star in his first NBA season, looking like he could be the league's best center in very short order. Embiid's sensational rookie campaign means the Sixers will be able to trade either Nerlens Noel or Chicago native Jahlil Okafor for a veteran backcourt player to balance out the roster.

And we still haven't seen 2016 No. 1 overall pick Ben Simmons, who's being brought back slowly from a broken foot suffered in a preseason game. Former general manager Sam Hinkie might not have been allowed to stay on to see "The Process" completed, but he deserves a lot of the credit for staying the course when other front-office execs would have bailed.

The Bad Boy Warriors

Who could have imagined the Golden State Warriors being mentioned in the same breath as the Bad Boy Pistons? Facing statement games this week against the Cavs and Thunder, Golden State took a page out of Bill Laimbeer's book, flattening LeBron James and Russell Westbrook with flagrant fouls. Now, James certainly embellished the hit he took from Draymond Green with one of the all-time soccer-style flops, but there's no arguing Green plays with an edge and physicality that borders on dirty.

Watching Zaza Pachulia stand over Westbrook after a deliberate smack down indicates Pachulia is more than ready to take on the enforcer role in what could be a much-anticipated third straight Finals matchup between the Warriors and Cavs. After watching tape of Wednesday night's incident, Westbrook had this to say about the team's next meeting Feb. 11 in Oklahoma City: "I'm going to get his ass back. Straight up."

Bummer draft news for Bulls

Sorry, Bulls fans. That future first-round pick Sacramento owes the Bulls (top-10 protected) from the Luol Deng trade years ago is almost certainly going to become a second-round pick this June. The Kings just went 1-6 on their longest homestand of the season, and now head out on the road for eight straight games. Even worse, they just lost their second best player, Rudy Gay, to a season-ending Achilles injury. Under the terms of the Deng trade, if the first-round pick owed to the Bulls isn't conveyed by this year's draft, it converts to a second-round pick. And after losing Gay for the season, the Kings are a lock to finish in the bottom 10.

So a chance for the Bulls to add a low lottery pick to their roster this summer just went out the window.

Stat of the week

Thanks to my friend Nick Friedell, who tweeted this gem from Jacob Nitzberg of ESPN Stats and Information: Tuesday night's game against Dallas marked Jimmy Butler's 16th game this season with 10-plus free throws made, which ties him with Chet Walker for the 10th-most such games in a single season in franchise history. Only Michael Jordan has more games in a season with 10-plus free throws made in franchise history.

And Russell Westbrook's incredible season continues as he looks to become the first NBA player to average a triple-double since the great Oscar Robertson back in 1961-62.

NBA season leaders in triple-doubles since Westbrook's rookie season (2008-09):

Season Player Triple-doubles Total NBA triple-doubles
2008-09 LeBron James 7 30
2009-10 LeBron James 4 23
2010-11 LeBron James 4 37
2011-12 Rajon Rondo 6 18
2012-13 Rajon Rondo 5 42
2013-14 Lance Stephenson 5 46
2014-15 Russell Westbrook 11 46
2015-16 Russell Westbrook 18 75
2016-17 Russell Westbrook 21 53 (through Jan. 18)

Quote of the week

Congratulations to Jimmy Butler on being named an Eastern Conference All-Star starter for the Feb. 19 game in New Orleans. Last week, Butler told reporters he really didn't care about whether or not he made the team, saying he'd be relaxing on a beach somewhere if he wasn't selected.

That prompted this response from Taj Gibson: "He's lying, he's lying so much. You never know what you're going to get from Jimmy. I know, definitely, he wants to make the All-Star team. He's been putting in a lot work in for it."

No question about it, Taj, Butler deserves to be in the East starting lineup as he continues to rise up the rankings of the top players in the game. Now the challenge for the Bulls is finding more athletes and shooters to put around him.