Pitcher Stock Watch

Pitcher Stock Watch

By David Ferris
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Buy

Wilton Lopez, RP, Astros: The ratios grab your attention first: 52 strikeouts against just seven walks, a 1.06 WHIP, tidy 2.24 ERA. And although Lopez is the closer for the worst team in MLB (by far), he still has a win and five saves over the last month. His handshakes are as good as anyone else's.

Jake Odorizzi, SP, Royals: The highly-touted KC prospect fashioned a 3.03 ERA and 130 strikeouts over 145 innings in the minors, covering two levels. The club wants to give him a cup of coffee in the show, so Odorizzi will get a shot against Cleveland on Sunday. That's a streamable turn to be sure, and Odorizzi might draw the same scuffling Indians the following week.

Andrew Werner, SP, Padres: He's been sharp in four of his first five turns, putting up three strikeouts for every walk and an acceptable 3.68 ERA and 1.13 WHIP. Most of the starts have come in offense-blunting Petco Park, but there's nothing wrong with trying Werner in San Francisco this weekend. The Giants hitters haven't seen him yet, either - advantage, Werner.

Martin Perez, SP, Rangers: He's one of the jewels of the Texas farm system, and he's getting a much-coveted start at Safeco Field this weekend. The Mariners couldn't touch Perez in a relief stint last week (4.1 IP, 0 H, 1 BB, 5 K); look for more of the same here.

Drew Smyly, SP, Tigers: Heads up if you need a Sunday fill-in - Max Scherzer (shoulder) might not be able to go, leaving Smyly as the Plan B. The opponent plays nice in this case: Minnesota is in town, with unheralded P.J. Walters throwing. Smile, you're at Mr. Smyly's.

Sell

Clayton Kershaw, SP, Dodgers: It's no sure thing he'll be able to start again this year - the team is being careful with Kershaw's sore hip - and even if the lefty does take to the mound, how confident can we be in his effectiveness? Roster spots have a currency at this time of year; if you need immediate reinforcements, you have our permission to drop Kershaw.

Tommy Hanson, SP, Braves: His walk and homer rates are heading in the wrong direction, and obviously a 4.33 ERA and 1.45 WHIP don't help anyone. Even with the best defensive outfield working behind him, Hanson can't keep the ball out of the gap (or in the park) consistently in 2012. He's been an overrated brand-name for years.  

Hold

Phil Hughes, SP, Yankees: He finally conquered his Fenway Park phobia - perhaps someone gave him a good look at the current lineup card in the Back Bay - and the Blue Jays and Rays are also putting out skeleton lineups at this time of year. For once, we can chase after non-elite AL East pitchers and not feel guilty about it.

Edwin Jackson, SP, Nationals: A bloated ERA over the last month might have some gamers off the scent, but Jackson still offers an acceptable WHIP (1.31) and 35 strikeouts over 29.2 innings. Don't sweat the unlucky hit rate of late; stay the course with this underrated righty. We'll use Jackson through the end of the year, even in shallow mixers.

Road Ahead: Blackhawks play three home games before All-Star break

Road Ahead: Blackhawks play three home games before All-Star break

CSN's Pat Boyle and Steve Konroyd preview the Blackhawks' three upcoming games in the Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

The Blackhawks have three home games before the NHL All-Star break, which takes place in Los Angeles.

The Blackhawks have dates between the Vancouver Canucks, Tampa Bay Lightning, and Winnipeg Jets. All three opponents are out of the playoff picture, sand Steve Konroyd is looking for the Blackhawks to step up in a certain part of their game: scoring.

See what Boyle and Konroyd had to say in the video above.

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

Bears numbers don't indicate 3-13, yet still lie

In doing some post-season wrapping up of my Nerdy NFL Notebook as we begin turning the page to the 2017 season, part of it involves compiling where each team finished in big-picture team offensive and defensive categories: overall ranking (total yards), as well as team rushing and passing ranks on both sides of the ball.

So if the Bears wound up ranked 15th overall in total yards gained and allowed, they should've finished…oh, 8-8, right? It adds to the deception of some of the deeper issues that focus on a lack of playmakers, which tied into their inability to make plays when it matters most. In John Fox's 9-23 start, 18 of those games have been decided by six points or less. They've won just six of those games. 

Offensively, the Bears ranked higher in total offense than five playoff teams: Kansas City (20), Detroit (21), Miami (24), New York Giants (25) and Houston (29). They wound up 17th in rushing offense, better than four teams who advanced: Seattle (25), Green Bay (26), New York Giants (29) and Detroit (30). And their 14th-ranked passing offense ranked better than the Giants (17), Kansas City (19), Dallas (23), Miami (26), Houston (29).

On the other side of the ball, they'd be even better off before allowing 109 points over the final three losses. Their total defense ranked better than Detroit (18), Green Bay (22), Kansas City (24), Atlanta (25), Oakland (26) and Miami (29). After being gashed for 558 rushing yards the last three games, they fell to 27th in the NFL against the run (better than only 30th-ranked Miami). But the seventh-ranked pass defense, despite collecting a measly eight interceptions (among only 11 turnovers), was better than nine playoff teams: Miami (15), Pittsburgh (16), Kansas City (18), Detroit (19), the Giants (23), Oakland (24), Dallas (26), Atlanta (28) and Green Bay (31).

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

What do all the hollow numbers indicate? A lack of complementary, opportunistic football, playmakers on both sides of the ball, a minus-20 turnover ratio, and a lack of quality and continuity at the quarterback position — to name a few. All of those playoff teams have more impact players (or kept more of their impact players healthy) than the Bears in 2016.

While some of the numbers aren't that bad to look at, and some even raise an eyebrow, there's still a deep climb from the most significant numbers: 3-13.