Rees pleased with Golson, even if it means less playing time


Rees pleased with Golson, even if it means less playing time

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- Three months ago, Tommy Rees had to be ready to enter games on a whim in case Everett Golson looked lost in Notre Dame's offense. He came in three times for the redshirt freshman, leading a game-winning scoring drive against Purdue and playing more than half of Notre Dame's 13-6 win over Michigan.
In early November, Rees once again replaced Golson for performance reasons late in the first half of Notre Dames tilt with Pittsburgh. But Golson came back in to that game, and thanks to his efforts plus a little luck, the Irish staved off an upset.
Golson hasn't looked back since Nov. 3. He's earned the trust of Brian Kelly and Chuck Martin to play through whatever struggles may arise.
But that doesn't mean Rees can take his helmet off and loiter around the sidelines, thanks to a rule that makes a player who had his helmet knocked off during a play sit out the following down.
"Thats come up on some third downs here, luckily been successful in a couple of them," Rees smirked. "Yeah, its another way that Everett manages for me to get thrown in there, but its been a fun run."
That run began in August, when Rees' one-game suspension for a May arrest knocked him out Notre Dame's fall camp quarterback battle before it even started. But while Rees didn't make an impact on the field, he was universally praised by the participants of the summer competition.
"He's been such a positive influence on all three of the younger guys," Andrew Hendrix said in August. "Having Tommy back there at all times is really an invaluable resource that we have."
For Golson, Rees was accessible for more than just quick questions on the field. The pair roomed together during camp, with the seasoned Rees serving as support for the relatively green Golson.
"Oh man, thered be a couple late night discussions," Rees explained. "Hed ask me what I thought he needed to improve on, you know, dont hold anything back.
"And I told him the truth sometimes -- I told him the truth all the time, sometimes it wasnt what he wanted to hear," Rees quickly corrected with a laugh. "But any way I could help, and Ive had a lot of fun working with him."
When Golson was named Notre Dame's starting quarterback in mid-August, it was tough to imagine him holding that role for a team that'll play for a title in early January. Even Golson himself couldn't have envisioned that.
"Id like to say I did, but really, I couldn't," Golson said. "Me being so young, you dont think about that, you kind of think about the smaller things -- whats going to happen on this play. You worry about the little things, you definitely dont want to mess up the little details."
Golson has reached the point where he feels he has the science of the position, to borrow a term used by Kelly plenty of times leading up to the season, down pretty well. The redshirt freshman is growing into a leader on the offense, too, a role that'll become more important with the departures of Braxston Cave, Tyler Eifert and Theo Riddick (and potentially Zack Martin) after the season ends.
Rees, though, has one more year of eligibility left at Notre Dame, and is firmly entrenched in a backup role. But he doesn't necessarily seem unhappy with it, which makes sense given teammates have projected him as a great coach someday.
Hes already showcased that talent, to some extent, by taking Golson under his wing.
"Hes an extremely talented player, and he had some growth but its been exciting to watch him grow on the field and off the field this year, Rees lauded. Hes a tremendous young man and young player, and its been a lot of fun working with him.

Watch: Dwyane Wade's boyish exuberance comes out after his first win with hometown Bulls

Watch: Dwyane Wade's boyish exuberance comes out after his first win with hometown Bulls

NBA superstar Dwyane Wade showed just how happy he was to capture his first regular season win for this hometown Bulls as he walked to the locker room on Thursday night.

Wade was unable to contain his excitement as he left the court, blurting out the following.

"Thats the way to do it. That's a homecoming right there. I like that one."

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

Wade finished his Bulls debut with 22 points, including hitting four three-pointers, grabbing six rebounds and dishing out five assists.

All capped off by a postgame hug with mom too.

Now that's one heck of a homecoming right there.


Bill Murray to conduct 7th inning stretch at Cubs-Indians World Series Game 3

Bill Murray to conduct 7th inning stretch at Cubs-Indians World Series Game 3

For the first time since 1945, Wrigley Field will play host to a World Series game.

As the Cubs welcome the Cleveland Indians into town this weekend for Games' 3, 4 and 5 of the Fall Classic, several celebrities and Cubs legends will be in attendance.

[MORE: Bill Murray makes Cubs address from the White House]

The Cubs announced on Friday that actor and comedian Bill Murray, who has been a staple at Cubs games this postseason, will conduct the 7th inning stretch during Game 3.

This won't be Murray's first rodeo singing "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" at Wrigley Field. Check out a few of his previous appearances below:

In addition to Murray, the Cubs also revealed that Chicagoland native and lead vocalist of Fall Out Boy, Patrick Stump, will sing the National Anthem, Wayne Messmer will sing "God Bless America" and Cubs Hall of Fame outfielder Billy Williams will toss the ceremonial first pitch.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

Former Cubs pitchers Greg Maddux and Mark Prior and first baseman Derrek Lee are also scheduled to be at Game 3, according to ESPN's Jesse Rogers.

Tune in to CSN at 6 p.m. for Cubs Postseason Live as our crew gets ready for Game 3 and be sure to flip over to CSN immediately after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on Cubs Postseason Live.