Reggie Jackson apologizes for his comments

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Reggie Jackson apologizes for his comments

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Reggie Jackson says he messed up by disparaging Alex Rodriguez, Gary Carter and other big names in baseball and has been reaching out to make apologies. Jackson had told Sports Illustrated that Rodriguez's statistics were tainted by the Yankees star's admitted use of performance-enhancing drugs. Jackson also said he didn't see Carter, Kirby Puckett, Phil Niekro, Don Sutton and Jim Rice as Hall of Famers. Jackson is a special adviser with the New York Yankees. The team released a statement Thursday from the Hall of Fame slugger. "In trying to convey my feelings about a few issues that I am passionate about, I made the mistake of naming some specific players," Jackson said. "This was inappropriate and unfair to those players, some of which are very close friends of mine. I think there are ways to speak from the heart without hurting people, and I'm disappointed that I didn't take greater care in expressing my views," he added. The Yankees had told Jackson to stay away from the clubhouse and team events following his pointed remarks to the magazine, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press earlier this week. Jackson was expected to steer clear for several weeks, the person told the AP on condition of anonymity because there was no formal announcement. Jackson was not disciplined or fined, and was to remain a special adviser. "I have been proactively reaching out to make personal apologies to those within the Hall of Fame community that I offended, and to the Yankees organization for any disruption that I caused in the clubhouse," Jackson said in his statement. "I continue to have a strong relationship with the club, and look forward to continuing in my role with the team," he said.

Cubs: Joe Maddon trolls White Sox and explains why trade rumors would bother Chris Sale

Cubs: Joe Maddon trolls White Sox and explains why trade rumors would bother Chris Sale

MILWAUKEE – The Cubs won’t walk onto U.S. Cellular Field on Monday night wearing black “Try Not To Cut” T-shirts with a scissors image replacing the manager’s iconic glasses. But Joe Maddon still couldn’t resist trolling the White Sox after Chris Sale’s temper tantrum.

With an AWOL pitcher, a manager on the hot seat and a front office under siege, the Cubs will see what they used to be in a rivalry that sometimes brought out the worst in them.

This is Carlos Zambrano-level bizarre on the South Side, the White Sox suspending Sale for five days after their franchise player cut up 1976 throwback jerseys, creating a feeding frenzy in the middle of trade-deadline-rumor season. That speculation apparently bothered Sale, who got sent home before Saturday’s scheduled start against the Detroit Tigers, leaving the bullpen to cover for his unprofessionalism.

“It’s not easy,” Maddon said before Sunday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park. “Obviously, it’s only going to occur if your team’s struggling a bit.

“If you’re doing well, that doesn’t happen. So you have the struggle of the group, and then a really good player being mentioned as a trade piece. From the manager’s perspective, it’s not as difficult as the player himself and then the inter-politics of the clubhouse. That’s where it becomes more difficult.

“You don’t even know what those conversations sound like and how that cuts at the fabric of what you’re attempting to do. No pun intended.”

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

Maddon’s presence as the team’s smirking ringmaster helps a rivalry that missed larger-than-life personalities like Lou Piniella and Ozzie Guillen. The Cubs won’t see Sale until Thursday night at Wrigley Field in this season’s fourth and final crosstown game between two franchises heading in opposite directions.

Maddon remembered the end of an era with the Tampa Bay Rays, when superstar pitcher David Price got traded to the Detroit Tigers in a three-team deal at the 2014 deadline. Within the next three months, Rays executive Andrew Friedman jumped for a president’s job with the Los Angeles Dodgers, triggering an escape clause in Maddon’s contract and giving Cubs fans a new costume for that Halloween.

“It was hard for David,” Maddon said. “It really was difficult, especially if it’s your first organization. I think if you bounced a little bit, it’s not so difficult. But if it’s your first time being included in trade conversations, it’s hard for the guy.

“Regardless of knowing that you could end up in a good spot, or you’re going to be wanted, (because) there’s really actually a lot of positives attached to it. It’s still the negative – you might really like where you’re at, it’s your first organization, you have a lot of friendships.

“Awkward. It’s an awkward feeling. You adjust. Everybody does. But there’s still all this unknown stuff that is unsettling.”

Like what the media circus and the fan atmospherics will be like during those two first two games at U.S. Cellular Field. Or if Buyers vs. Sellers plays out this week and the Cubs and White Sox start making big deals. So much for the White Sox bonding after Adam LaRoche’s retirement in the middle of spring training and using that money to reinvest at the trade deadline. Or Sale smoothing everything over after torching executive vice president Kenny Williams for the way he handled Drake LaRoche’s clubhouse access.

“I’m sure it will be entertaining,” Maddon said. “The South Siders have a wonderful sense of humor that we can definitely all appreciate.”

Cubs hope adding Joe Nathan to bullpen can be like making a trade-deadline splash

Cubs hope adding Joe Nathan to bullpen can be like making a trade-deadline splash

MILWAUKEE – As the New York Yankees engaged in the bidding war for Aroldis Chapman, the Cubs welcomed Joe Nathan into their clubhouse, hoping a six-time All-Star closer can become a game changer for their bullpen.

At the age of 41 – and after two Tommy John surgeries on his right elbow – Nathan won’t be throwing 105 mph. But even if the Cubs aren’t getting Nathan at the height of his powers, it’s still a potential upgrade before the Aug. 1 trade deadline.

“We’ll see,” Nathan said before Sunday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park. “These guys obviously have done something special the first half of the season and put themselves in a great (position) to make the postseason.

“Time will tell who is the right fit. And if they’re going to make more moves, who knows? I’m sure they’re checking to see what’s out there. But for us, we just want to concentrate on today and getting a ‘W.’”

To activate Nathan off the 60-day disabled list – and add a reliever who’s eighth on the all-time list with 377 career saves – the Cubs optioned Adam Warren to Triple-A Iowa to stretch him out as a starter.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

The Cubs believe Nathan is still hungry, even after making more than $85 million in his career, wanting to write a different ending after facing only one hitter with the Detroit Tigers last year, his season ending on Opening Day.

Nathan was willing to take the prorated major-league minimum, sweat through the heat at the team’s Arizona complex and try to find it again at Double-A Tennessee and Iowa.

“Right from Day 1, it really wasn’t a question of if I’m going to try to come back from this,” Nathan said. “Why not? Why wouldn’t I at least put my best foot forward? If I’m going to rehab it, I might as well go 100 percent at it and see where it goes.

“The good test for me was I was living at home, going through it, bringing the kids to school, doing homework, doing normal stuff. At the same time, I still had the itch.

“That kind of told me, too. If I was home, and I was like, ‘You know what, this is kind of nice,’ it would have been easy to just say: ‘No, I’m good.’ But I still had that kick in the butt to get up and come back to this game.”

Carlos Rodon set to make rehab start at Triple-A Charlotte

Carlos Rodon set to make rehab start at Triple-A Charlotte

Carlos Rodon is closer to returning to the White Sox and Anthony Ranaudo is here.

The White Sox announced that Rodon is set to make a rehab start at Triple-A Charlotte on Monday.

Rodon — who is 2-7 with a 4.50 ERA this season — was placed on the disabled list with a sprained left wrist retroactive to July 6. He sustained the injury while running up the dugout steps in the final week of the first half.

The White Sox promoted Ranaudo on Sunday after they placed Chris Sale on the suspended list. Sale’s five-game suspension is retroactive to Saturday, when his start was skipped and he was sent home early after destroying the promotional 1976 throwback jerseys the team was scheduled to wear.

A former supplemental first-round draft pick, Ranaudo was acquired from the Texas Rangers on May 12. He was 5-3 with a 3.20 ERA in 13 starts at Triple-A Charlotte. Drafted by the Boston Red Sox in 2010, Ranaudo has a 6.33 ERA in 13 career games in the majors.

The White Sox also added Carlos Sanchez as their 26th man before the start of Sunday’s originally scheduled game. The teams completed Saturday’s rain-suspended contest earlier Sunday with the White Sox winning 4-3.