Reviewing the year's bizarre moments in golf

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Reviewing the year's bizarre moments in golf

From Comcast SportsNetDave Kindred, a preeminent American sports writer who has worked his trade for the better part of four decades, was walking down the right side of the first fairway at Kiawah Island with the final group at the PGA Championship when he mentioned he had been teaching a writing class to college students.Like most great columnists, Kindred's strength is his power of observation, and he has tried to pass that along."The one thing I tell them," he said, "is that if you really pay attention to what you're covering, you'll see something you've never seen before."He stopped and kneeled to watch Carl Pettersson, playing in the last group that Sunday with Rory McIlroy, hit his approach to the green. Pettersson was just inside the red hazard line, so he was careful not to ground his club. Brushing the top of the grass was OK.Moments after his shot, he was approached by PGA rules official Brad Gregory and told there might be a problem.In a bizarre development, Pettersson's club nicked a leaf on the way back, a violation of Rule 13-4c for moving a loose impediment in a hazard. After an exhaustive video review, Pettersson was given the bad news -- a two-stroke penalty -- on the fourth hole.Pay attention and you never know what you'll see.That much was true in a wild year of golf. Phil Mickelson lost his bid at the Masters by hitting two shots right-handed. Rory McIlroy was confused by the time zone and needed a police escort to get to the final day of the Ryder Cup on time. Tiger Woods never found his golf ball, was not penalized and still missed the cut.Those have been well-documented. What follows is the 2012 edition of "Tales from the Tour," the obscure moments that keep golf so interesting and entertaining.------Kyle Stanley is a quiet man. This was a quiet celebration.One week after he made triple bogey on the 18th hole at Torrey Pines and then lost in a playoff, he rallied from eight shots behind on the final day with a 65 in the Phoenix Open to win his first PGA Tour event. It was a remarkable turnaround. One week he faced the media after his meltdown and fought back tears. The next week he was a winner.Stanley was invited to a Super Bowl party that night at the home of Jim Mackay, the longtime caddie of Phil Mickelson. He was late to the party because of the media obligations that come with winning. When he finally arrived, Stanley knocked and then walked in the door holding the oversized winner's check over his head.He quietly placed it above the TV, and then sat down to watch the game, a player at peace.------No other golfer spends more time with the media after every round than Ryo Ishikawa, who is treated like a rock star in Japan. When he signs his card, even when it's late in the day, it's not unusual for the 21-year-old to spend close to an hour fulfilling his media obligations.That's where "The Chair" comes in.His handlers have a white folding chair for Ishikawa as he endures two interviews with different television stations. A dozen or so reporters form a semi-circle around him as they wait and listen, occasionally jotting down notes. Then, it's their turn. They spent close to 15 minutes with Ishikawa after his round at Innisbrook, going over the clubs he used and shots he hit on just about every hole -- this after a 73 that left him 12 shots out of the lead.Finally, he was finished. He got up from the chair and walked around the clubhouse toward the parking lot. The Japanese reporters followed him, walking in a group about 20 yards behind. One of them was asked where they were going."Now we wave goodbye," the reporter explained.Indeed, they stood on a sidewalk and waved as Ishikawa's car drove by them.------Butch Harmon was talking retirement in the spring. He turned 69 this year. A Vietnam War vet, he has been teaching most of his life, working for Sky Sports and traveling the world, which is starting to take its toll. He worries about the day when his attention span is short or he doesn't care as much as he once did."It's not there, but it's coming," he said. "I will never step away. I'll always teach. I love to teach."The next morning, he was on the range at Quail Hollow waiting for Phil Mickelson to arrive. Gary Christian , a 40-year-old PGA Tour rookie from England, walked over and introduced himself. Christian said he was fascinated to watch so many Americans use the leading edge of the club on wedge shots. They chatted for a few minutes and after Christian walked away, Harmon said, "Who was that?"Harmon nodded when told about Christian's back story, how he came to America on a college scholarship, supported himself by selling steak knives and toiled in the minor leagues for 15 years before finally making it to the big leagues.Still no sign of Mickelson.A few minutes later, Harmon walked over to Christian. He spent a few minutes observing, and then pulled a wedge from the bag and gave an impromptu lesson.He'll always teach. He loves to teach.------You've seen the sign at the baggage claim to check your luggage because some bags may look alike. That goes for golf travel bags, too.Nick Watney and Angel Cabrera arrived in San Francisco for the U.S. Open about the same time, on different flights. Cabrera kept waiting at oversized luggage for his bag to come out, and he began to think the airlines had lost it. There was only one golf bag there, and it belonged to Watney.That's when the light came on.Cabrera's agent called the person in charge of U.S. Open courtesy cars and asked them to stop Watney on his way out.Sure enough, Cabrera's golf bag was in his trunk.------The relationship three-time major champion Padraig Harrington has with reporters is unlike that of any other player, especially the Irish media.He was giving an interview to Greg Allen of Irish radio station RTE, and after they finished, Harrington began making small talk. He asked Allen, "I heard you lost your sunglasses?" Allen's shoulders slumped as he told Harrington he had misplaced his glasses and didn't know where to look for them.Harrington didn't commiserate. He smiled."They're in my locker," he said. "You left them behind the other day."------Sung Kang received elite training in South Korea's national program that is producing more and more top players, but he worked equally hard on his English and speaks beautifully for someone who has played the PGA Tour only the last few years.Turns out he has been coming to America twice a year since 2002 to work on his golf, and he devoted just as much effort to the language.In Florida? California?"Dallas," Kang said. "I went to the Hank Haney schools, so I would work with Haney and learned English there in Texas."Some things, however, still get lost in translation. Kang was asked if he ever bought cowboy boots from all that time spent in Dallas."No," he said. "I don't really like the NFL. I'm more of a Lakers fan."------The British Open has a massive scoreboard in the press center where a group of volunteers, most of them women in their early 20s, move ladders on rails from side to side as they post the score of every hole for every player.Press officers often check to see which players they should bring in for interviews the first two rounds as the leaderboard is taking shape. In the second round, Adam Scott had a 67 to get within one shot of the lead with several players still on the course.The announcement over the intercom: "Can we see a show of hands for Adam Scott?"Six young women posting scores all raised their hands.------About two dozen fans waiting for autographs behind the ninth green on the Magnolia Course at Disney got more than they expected. Brian Harman emerged from the scoring trailer after the final PGA Tour event of the year and said, "Who's left-handed?"One man came forward, and it turned out to be his lucky day.Harman went over to his bag, removed all the irons and handed them to the fan. Turns out Harman wanted to try something different at Disney, so he used irons with graphite shafts. He described it as the worst ball-striking week he had all year."I just wanted to try some different stuff," Harman said. "And now I know what was not the answer."No other sports organization comes close to the amount of charity produced by the PGA Tour. Harman took it to a new level.

Fire add Senegalese midfielder Khaly Thiam

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Fire add Senegalese midfielder Khaly Thiam

After stuttering through the first seven matches of the season, reinforcements are on the way for the Chicago Fire.

Senegalese midfielder Khaly Thiam will join the team later this week on a loan deal with an option to buy. The move is pending league approval although the official announcement is expected soon.

The deal was in the works more than a month ago, but Thiam needed to finish his season with Hungarian team MTK Budapest before joining the Fire. MTK wrapped up its season on Saturday and finished fourth in the Hungarian league, losing out on a Europa League berth on the final match of the season.

“He is going to join us this week," Fire coach Veljko Paunovic said during his weekly conference call. "He is going to do physical and medicals. He’ll be here and he’s very important for us. We believe the addition of Thiam is very important to increase our competitiveness with all his qualities, especially he is very good on the ball. He is very good also in aerial duels and his presence on the field is very important. With him we will increase our competitiveness in the team and of course within the league.”

The Fire can use the help immediately after having four players miss out on Saturday’s 1-1 draw with D.C. United due to injury. David Accam is expected to be available against Vancouver on May 11, but odds are he won’t be able to start, especially on a turf field. Matt Polster, John Goossens and Alex Morrell were also out injured against D.C.

Thiam, 22, is a box-to-box midfielder who on paper would seem like a good fit to line up next to Polster as one of the two central mids in Paunovic’s 4-2-3-1 formation. This season for MTK, Thiam made 31 appearances, 27 starts, and scored two goals.

“He can play in different positions in the midfield," Paunovic said. "He can play in different systems. So far we were using 4-2-3-1 as our basic system, standard. In that system he can play either together with another midfielder (or in other roles). He’s going to increase that competitiveness. We can also switch to a 4-3-3, 3-5-2. Being adaptable he can play in different systems and roles, that’s something we value a lot."

He started his professional career in Hungary, playing the past four seasons in that league. He totaled 72 appearances and seven goals in that time.

Fire midfielder Arturo Alvarez played in Hungary before joining the Fire this offseason. A few weeks ago when the rumors started swirling, Alvarez was asked if he had heard of him. For what it's worth, Alvarez recalled him right away and described Thiam as a nice player, who was "tidy" on the ball.

Blackhawks' Artemi Panarin named 2016 Calder Trophy finalist

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Blackhawks' Artemi Panarin named 2016 Calder Trophy finalist

Artemi Panarin has been named a 2016 Calder Trophy finalist, annually awarded to the "most proficient" player in his rookie season in the National Hockey League.

Philadelphia's Shayne Gostisbehere and Edmonton's Connor McDavid rounded out the top 3.

Panarin, 24, led all rookies this season with 77 points — 30 goals, 47 assists — in 80 regular-season games. Seven of his 30 goals turned out to be the game-winner, which also ranked No. 1 among first-year players.

The last player to record at least 77 points during his rookie season was Pittsburgh's Evgeni Malkin when he compiled 85 points in 2006-07.

Panarin had one of the best rookie seasons in franchise history, with only Steve Larmer putting up more points (90) in 1982-83.

He became the first Blackhawks rookie to register four-point games in back-to-back contests when on April 1 against Winnipeg — two goals, two assists) and on April 3 against Boston — one goal, three assists.

Panarin also became the first rookie in franchise history to record multi-goal games in consecutive appearances — on Jan. 5 and 6 against the Penguins — since 2005 (Pavel Vorobiev).

Gostisbehere had 17 goals and 29 assists in 64 regular-season games this season with the Flyers. His 46 points ranked No. 1 among rookie defensemen despite getting called up to the NHL in mid-November.

McDavid had 48 points in 45 regular-season games this season with the Oilers. He missed three months with a collarbone injury, but ranked first among rookies in points per game (1.07).

Illinois chancellor announces process to pick new Illini mascot

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Illinois chancellor announces process to pick new Illini mascot

If you were bothered by the lack of a costumed character roaming the sidelines at Illinois football and basketball games, your troubles are over.

University of Illinois chancellor Barbara J. Wilson announced during a campus meeting Monday that the school is beginning the process of choosing a new mascot, according to a report from the Champaign News-Gazette's Julie Wurth.

Mind you, this isn't signalling the return of Chief Illiniwek, who wasn't a masoct anyway, the university classifying the Chief as a symbol. No, this is something new, and the result would figure to be more in the vein of the cartoonish figures celebrating touchdowns and crowd surfing at football and basketball games.

From Wurth's report:

Wilson endorsed the recommendation from an Illinois Student Senate ad hoc committee that recently urged the campus to move forward with a mascot. She met with the group on Friday.

She plans to form a committee of 10 to 12 people that will draw up a process and a timeline. It will include representatives from all the stakeholders involved — students, faculty, staff, alumni and community members.

Wilson, who had already signaled her support for the student effort, said last week that any new mascot would embody the values and traditions of the campus.

Chief Illiniwek was retired in 2007 amid concerns that the costumed performer was offensive to Native Americans. The Illinois marching band still plays the music the Chief used to perform to, and people wearing the costume have appeared in the stands during games while the music played. All that, of course, is unofficial, and while many Illini alumi and fans continue to hope the university will bring back Chief Illiniwek, they will have to settle for whatever this new mascot ends up being.

Certainly, Wilson seems aware that this is a sensitive subject for many.

Illinois is currently one of just three Big Ten schools without a costumed mascot, Indiana and Michigan being the others. Iowa boasts Herky Hawkeye, Maryland has Testudo, Michigan State has Sparty, Minnesota has Goldy Gopher, Nebraska has Herbie Husker (and Li'l Red), Northwestern has Willie Wildcat, Ohio State has Brutus Buckeye, Penn State has the Nittany Lion, Purdue has Purdue Pete, Rutgers has the Scarlet Knight and Wisconsin has Bucky Badger.