Saying goodbye to an old friend, Rick Majerus

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Saying goodbye to an old friend, Rick Majerus

When I learned of the death of my very good friend, Rick Majerus, on Saturday night, I wasnt stunned but deeply saddened. I knew that Rick was in very poor health and was never going to coach again, but I wasnt prepared for the sadness that I feel at the loss of a friend who has had a great influence on my life.
I have known Rick since we coached against each other in 1982, when he was an assistant at Marquette and I was a young assistant at Northern Illinois. I remember getting to know him well after he was named Marquettes head coach in 1983, and I would see him on the recruiting trail looking at players in and around the Chicago area.
However, we became very close when he moved on to Ball State and then the University of Utah, when he became a subscriber to my scouting service that I spent 10 years publishing after leaving coaching. Rick would call often about players, looking for a sleeper that Big Ten schools had missed on, and always asked about the toughness of a particular player.
Is he tough enough to play for me? What kind of a kid is he? Those would always be the first questions he would ask, saving questions on the players basketball skills for later in our conversation.
First, he always asked about me and my family and how my son Brett was doing.
When I remarried in 2004, I sent Rick an invitation sure that he wouldnt attend. But he flew from Maui to be at the ceremony and then spent several hours at the reception talking basketball and sports with some of the other guests. Rick took a genuine interest in my family, including my son and stepsons who he always asked me about, even offering my oldest stepson Nick a chance to attend his camps or to walk on and play for him at St. Louis University.
A few years ago Rick called me on a summer afternoon and asked me how my career was going, and was I making progress in getting to call college basketball games as an analyst on TV. When I asked him, "Why?" he replied, I am going to the Milwaukee Brewers game tonight with a TV executive who I am very good friends with. When you get done with your radio show, drive to Milwaukee and have dinner with us. I want him to meet you and I want to tell him he needs to hire you to do games for him.
That was Rick in a nutshell. Thinking of how he could help someone else. Always calling and inviting me to games, to dinner or agreeing to come on my radio show. He was an amazing friend who would never say no and just wanted to have fun together and talk ball as he called it. We would X and O or just talk basketball and about life.
He asked me to have him on my radio show a couple of seasons back, but he wanted to make sure that it would be a lengthy interview. "Put me on for an entire hour, Kap. I want to talk with you," he said. When I told him that I couldn't devote a full hour to St. Louis University basketball on a Chicago radio station, he laughed and said, "We can talk about stem cell research and abortion rights and the war, too. I just went to a Hillary Clinton rally and I have a lot to say about things other than basketball."
We booked the interview and he spent most of the hour talking about social issues, the importance of family and education and a few minutes on how much he loved coaching at St. Louis University. That was the Rick Majerus I knew. He was well-read, he was a deep thinker and he was as loyal a friend as you could possibly hope to have.
He was an amazing man and someone that I will never forget. Rick, I will miss you, my friend. I hope you are sitting down to a wonderful meal and talking ball with some of the all-time greats who are in heaven with you. I will always cherish our friendship and your influence on my life. Rest in peace.

Jerry Reinsdorf, Frank Thomas congratulate Tim Raines on Baseball Hall of Fame election

Jerry Reinsdorf, Frank Thomas congratulate Tim Raines on Baseball Hall of Fame election

Tim Raines became the 39th former member of the White Sox to be elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday.

White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf released a statement congratulating Raines on his election.

“On behalf of the entire White Sox organization and our fans, I want to sincerely congratulate Tim on today’s election to the Hall of the Fame, the highest and greatest honor bestowed upon a baseball player,” said Jerry Reinsdorf, chairman of the Chicago White Sox. “He played a crucial role on the 1993 division championship team, was a key member of the 2005 World Series-winning coaching staff and provided Sox fans with great memories that will not be forgotten.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

Frank Thomas, who played with Raines from 1991-95, had high praise for his former teammate.

“Rock was one of my favorite teammates ever,” said Hall-of-Famer and White Sox legend Frank Thomas. “He made the game fun night-to-night and was a great leader in the clubhouse. His humor and hustle always brought the team closer. I’m so glad this has finally happened for one of my favorite people ever.”

Thomas also went on Twitter to express his excitement for Raines heading to Cooperstown.

Bulls Talk Podcast: What went wrong for the Bulls against the Mavericks?

Bulls Talk Podcast: What went wrong for the Bulls against the Mavericks?

In the latest edition of the Bulls Talk Podcast, Mark Schanowski, Kendall Gill and Justin O'Neil assess what went wrong for the Bulls in their Tuesday-night loss to the Mavericks and wonder why the Bulls struggle against good teams but win against the league's top teams.

Also, the guys discuss whether the Bulls are over reliant on isolation plays for Jimmy Butler and Dwayne Wade in the fourth quarter. And, Robin Lopez says he might start taking 3-pointers. What does Kendall think about the new era of the stretch five?

Plus, Kendall shares which NBA city was the biggest road party scene, and the guys discuss the possible comeback of Ben Gordon.