Scheyer finds a home in Israel

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Scheyer finds a home in Israel

After failing to find a home in the NBA and recovering from eye surgery, former Glenbrook North and Duke basketball star Jon Scheyer decided the best path to continue his professional career would lead him to Israel.

Last June, he signed a two-year contract for a reported 450,000 to play for Maccabi Tel Aviv, the European League's 2011 runnerup and five-time champion. He began playing for his new team on Oct. 1. A month earlier, Scheyer, who is Jewish, obtained Israeli citizenship.

"I am really excited to take the next step in my basketball career and go play for Maccabi Tel Aviv," he said. "I am looking forward to the opportunity to play for a team with such great tradition."

Scheyer's reputation preceded him. The 6-foot-5 shooting guard led Glenbrook North to the Class AA championship as a junior in 2005, finished as the fourth-leading scorer in state history with 3,034 points and was acclaimed as Illinois' Mr. Basketball. In one of the most celebrated performances in state history, he scored 21 points in 75 seconds in a quarterfinal game of the Proviso West Holiday Tournament, an entertaining clip that has been viewed more than 160,000 times on YouTube.

After choosing Duke over Illinois, Arizona and Wisconsin, Scheyer averaged 12.2, 11.7, 14.9 and 18.2 points per game in four years under coach Mike Krzyzewski. As a senior, he became the second player in Illinois history to win a state high school title and an NCAA title, following former Thornridge and Indiana star Quinn Buckner.

Despite his many awards and achievements -- he was a consensus second-team All-American, one of six finalists for the Bob Cousy award as the nation's top point guard, one of 10 finalists for the John Wooden Award as the nation's top player and the only player in Duke history to record at least 2,000 points, 500 rebounds, 400 assists, 250 three-pointers and 200 steals in his career -- Scheyer wasn't selected in the 2010 NBA draft.

Although Krzyzewski said he would be "a little bit surprised" if Scheyer wasn't on an NBA roster for the 2011-12 season, NBA scouts and coaches weren't convinced. Not physical enough, some argued. Not athletic enough to defend on the perimeter, others said.

Scheyer pursued his dream with the Miami Heat's summer league team, attended the Los Angeles Clippers training camp and played with the Houston Rockets' Developmental League team. But a serious, life-changing eye injury eventually led to surgery and, after originally turning down several offers to play overseas, he finally decided to go to Israel.

"We always thought that Scheyer had a legitimate shot at making the NBA due to his work ethic and basketball IQ. But we are not all that surprised that he is playing overseas instead," said recruiting analyst Roy Schmidt of Illinois Prep Bulls-Eye.

"Actually, that is where we thought he would end up and it is not a bad option at all. You can make good money, play against good international competition and live well.

"What is unfortunate is that Scheyer does not fit the mold of the prototypical NBA player in the eyes of professional scouts. While he is a smart player who is also skilled, he lacks the things that are perceived as being automatic ingredients for NBA stardom -- size and athleticism."

Glenbrook North coach Dave Weber, Scheyer's high school coach, believes the decision to play in Israel is a good step.

"He should be in the NBA. But he had eye surgery. He would have been in the NBA if he hadn't gotten injured," Weber said. "He is a smart point guard. He will fight through it. How good is he right now? How is he playing now? Maybe some day he will get to the NBA."

For the time being, Scheyer is enjoying his experience in Israel and battling to earn more playing time. Playing against Real Madrid, Hapoel Tel Aviv, Anadolu Efes and Partizan in Group C of the Euroleague might not sound like prime-time matches with North Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio State and Kansas but Scheyer concedes it is a tough transition.

"Every team is coming at us every night. It's just like Duke," Scheyer told Tablet magazine in Tel Aviv last week. "When I was going to Duke, you know it's going to be such a high level. But you don't know what to expect until you get to your first practice. No matter how many times you watch or your teammates have told you, you just need to experience it. The game is played differently. It takes a little time to get adjusted."

Longtime Euroleague and Maccabi Tel Aviv observers point out that starring immediately in Tel Aviv would be akin to earning All-American honors as a freshman at Duke -- not even Scheyer did that -- and the transition to Israeli basketball hasn't been as glamorous as his Albert Pujols-hyped arrival. He has yet to play in Maccabi's two Euroleague games and he has averaged about 10 minutes per game in the Adriatic and Israeli leagues.

At 24, he knows he has time to put his game in order and achieve his goal of playing in the NBA.

Huskers transfer Andrew White III picks Syracuse

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Huskers transfer Andrew White III picks Syracuse

One of the leading scorers in the Big Ten is taking his talents to the ACC.

Andrew White III, who opted to transfer away from Nebraska after going through the NBA Draft process, will play for Syracuse during the 2016-17 season. As a graduate transfer, he is immediately eligible.

White informed ESPN of his decision Sunday before tweeting his own picture of him in Orange gear.

White started his college career at Kansas before transferring to Nebraska, where he averaged 16.6 points per game last season, the second-best scorer on the team and the sixth-best scoring average in the Big Ten. White was also the Huskers' leading rebounder last season, averaging 5.9 rebounds a game and ranking in the top 15 in the conference.

Like many others with eligibility remaining, White took advantage of new rules allowing him to go through the NBA Draft process without hiring an agent, giving him the option to return to college with his eligibility intact. After doing so, he decided to leave Nebraska, a decision that upset his coach.

White visited Michigan State after deciding to transfer, setting up the possibility of his transferring within the conference, but he'll go out of conference with his move to Syracuse, a team that reached the Final Four last season.

Big Ten preview: Can Mike Weber follow in Ezekiel Elliott's footsteps?

Big Ten preview: Can Mike Weber follow in Ezekiel Elliott's footsteps?

Two years ago, we all wondered if Ezekiel Elliott would be able to fill the void left by the departure of Carlos Hyde.

We probably all feel a little silly about that question now, huh?

It’s the nature of college football, of course, but despite high recruiting rankings, Elliott was a question mark a season after Hyde was the Big Ten’s best running back for Ohio State. Elliott then went on to break out in the postseason for the national champs, and last year he was one of college football’s best running backs, rushing for 1,821 yards and earning a top-five spot in the NFL Draft.

So it’s on to the next question mark at Ohio State: Mike Weber.

Weber potentially has even higher expectations than Elliott did. The No. 7 running back recruit in the Class of 2015 and the best player in the state of Michigan, Weber famously decommitted from Michigan during a loss to Maryland in Brady Hoke’s final season. Weber then committed to Urban Meyer and the Buckeyes, and thanks to those high recruiting rankings, people have been wondering about when he would star for Ohio State for a couple years now.

The time has come, maybe a little earlier than it was supposed to. Elliott, after all, left following his junior season, and the dismissal of Bri’onte Dunn earlier this offseason left Weber as really the only option in the backfield for the Buckeyes. Meyer all but declared Weber the starter during Big Ten Media Days.

“I like where he's at. I don't like, I love where he's at as far as what kind of physical condition he's in,” Meyer said. “And I anticipate he'll be the starting tailback, but that's why we have training camp.”

Like many of the rest of the guys who will be stepping into starting roles for Ohio State this fall, Weber has no collegiate experience. He redshirted last season. It means, like many of his teammates, he’ll have to get ready and he’ll have to prove that he can turn those high recruiting rankings into gameday success.

And who else is getting Weber ready but quarterback J.T. Barrett.

Barrett knows a thing or two about being an inexperienced player in a starting role. That’s what he was as a redshirt freshman two seasons ago when Braxton Miller was injured right before the season started. Barrett proved he was ready, leading the Buckeyes to an 11-1 regular season before suffering his own injury ahead of Ohio State’s postseason run.

“Mike Weber, he’s an explosive back that we have,” Barrett said. “He cares a lot about his teammates, I feel like. We’re going to just keep on pushing him. I try to push him every day, I work out with him quite a bit and just try to make sure he understands that the work that happens in the offseason is where you win the game. You don’t win the game Sept. 17 when we’re at Oklahoma or when we’re down the road playing at a place like Wisconsin. That’s not where you win the game at. You win the game in the offseason and in the moments that really define you and who you are.

"So I’m just pushing him to strive to get better. I push him, he probably at times hates me. I know he could give so much for this team, and I just want to make sure he performs at his best.”

It’s a team-wide theme, getting these young guys ready for game action. As Barrett mentioned, there’s a huge early season test coming at Oklahoma, and that’ll be quite the baptism by fire for the young Weber.

But as much as lack of experience is a theme for these Buckeyes, so too is big expectations. Weber was part of a highly rated Ohio State recruiting class, and at Ohio State those guys are expected to deliver.

Elliott did in taking over for Hyde. Maybe we’ll all feel silly about questioning Weber, too.

Preview: Arrieta, Cubs return home to face Pirates Monday on CSN

Preview: Arrieta, Cubs return home to face Pirates Monday on CSN

Jake Arrieta and the Cubs return home to battle the Pittsburgh Pirates on Monday, and you can catch all the action on CSN at 7:05 p.m. Then catch first pitch with Len Kasper and Jim Deshaies. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on Cubs Postgame Live.

Starting pitching matchup: Steven Brault (0-1, 3.60 ERA) vs. Jake Arrieta (16-5, 2.62 ERA)

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.  

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