"The Shrug Game" airs tonight on CSN

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"The Shrug Game" airs tonight on CSN

Five things to watch for in Comcast SportsNet Chicago's Wednesday night "Bulls Classics" broadcast of the Bulls' 122-89 Game 1 1992 NBA Finals victory over the Portland Trailblazers on June 3, 1992 (airing at 7:30 p.m.):

1) This game will forever be known as the "Shrug Game," for Michael Jordan's sly shrug after hitting his sixth three-pointer of the contest. With his 6-for-10 shooting from deep and 35 first-half points en route to a game-high 39 on the evening, there wasn't much else to accomplish after the intermission, as he left Portland completely demoralized, setting the tone for what would eventually be the Bulls' second consecutive championship. Not that Jordan hadn't proved he could make outside jumpers by that point in his career, but given how dangerous he was attacking the basket, Trailblazers were at a loss as to how to stop him. However, it wasn't as if Jordan had a one-track mind that night, as he also finished with 11 assists, proving a willing passer when the defense heavily committed to him.

2) Scottie Pippen's versatility was in full bloom by this point in his career, something made evident by his near triple-double of 24 points, 10 assists and nine rebounds. While he wasn't quite the scoring threat Jordan was -- as if any other player was -- Pippen had to be fully accounted for by opponents, lest he take over games, which he was fully capable of doing by then. Pippen not only expertly complemented Jordan's game and enabled him to rest defensively by guarding the other team's top perimeter scorer, he could also shoulder the offensive load himself when necessary. With the two top wing talents in the game on the same team, rivals were at the Bulls' mercy.

3) Chicago's bench was also coming into its own, as B.J. Armstrong (11 points and six assists) provided offensive firepower, forward Cliff Levingston and young center Scott Williams (12 points and nine rebounds) provided hustle and Bobby Hansen gave the team additional perimeter shooting. Backup big men Will Perdue and Stacey King, now the Bulls' television color analyst, added even more interior depth. Besides Armstrong, none of the reserves had an especially noteworthy individual NBA career, but as a unit, their skills were a perfect match to spell Chicago's starters.

4) Portland, which also lost to Detroit in the 1990 NBA Finals, was one of the better teams to never win a title during that era. Under Rick Adelman, the new coach of the Timberwolves, the Blazers had a deep and talented lineup, led by star shooting guard Clyde Drexler and steady floor general Terry Porter in the backcourt. They also had great size up front, with center Kevin Duckworth, underrated power forward Buck Williams and athletic small forward Jerome Kersey. Off the bench, the key players were perennial Sixth Man of the Year award candidate Cliff Robinson, blue-collar Mark Bryant and sharpshooter Danny Ainge, now the Celtics' top executive.

5) Drexler (16 points on 5-for-14 shooting) didn't have his best outing that particular evening, but the All-Star was regarded as one of the best players at his position in that era -- perhaps second to only Jordan -- something confirmed by his selection to the 1992 Dream Team. In fact, Drexler's all-around skills rivaled Jordan, as his size, athleticism, versatility and scoring ability put him in the upper echelon of players in the league. Some fans may remember Drexler as the reason Jordan ended up in the Bulls uniform in the first place. His presence in Portland -- along with that of veteran swingman Jim Paxson, the brother of Bulls guard John Paxson (both Paxsons currently work for the Bulls; John as the executive vice president and Jim, Cleveland's former general manager, as a scout) -- led the Blazers to select center Sam Bowie with the No. 2 overall pick in the 1984 NBA Draft, one choice after Drexler's college teammate at the University of Houston, Hakeem Olajuwon went first to the Rockets.

After 20 years, Dan Sharp steps down as Joliet Catholic head coach

After 20 years, Dan Sharp steps down as Joliet Catholic head coach

Joliet Catholic Academy head football coach Dan Sharp has resigned his coaching position at the school and will retain his athletic director position.

"It was time," Sharp said. "It's been a long, great and wonderful coaching career for me coaching the Hilltoppers, and now it's the right time to step aside. It's been an emotional drain handling both jobs. I'm going to miss the kids and the coaches, but also it was just time."

Sharp hired assistant coach Jake Jaworski as the school's next varsity football coach. Jaworski, a teacher at Joliet Catholic Academy, was also a multi-sport athlete and starting defensive back on Joliet Catholic's state-championship teams in 2000 and 2001.

"It's not very often that you are allowed to hand-pick your successor," Sharp said. "Jaws is more than ready to take over the program and bring in some excitement, and I know that I'm leaving the football program into great hands."

Sharp, who posted a 199-51 record in 20 seasons at Joliet Catholic (223-69 record overall in 24 years), is also excited to help his new head coach take over the reins of one of the state's traditional power programs.

"I'm looking forward to getting Jake off to a good start."

White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf knows 'it will be very hard to trade' Chris Sale

White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf knows 'it will be very hard to trade' Chris Sale

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The baseball world has come to suburban DC for the winter meetings. In a hotel just steps away from the Potomac River, the White Sox are holding onto the biggest fish available.

But trading their ace Chris Sale might be tougher than it seems because of the White Sox steep asking price. Will any team meet their demands? That’s the question.

"You have to have four prospects who can’t possibly miss to get one," White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf told CSN. "I’ve seen so many players over the years who were going to be phenoms, they were going to be future Hall of Famers, and we don’t even remember what their names are anymore. That’s why when you’re trading a player of stature you’ve got to get multiple can’t-miss prospects back. That’s why it makes it tough to trade a player of great stature."

With the meetings in their hometown this year, the Washington Nationals could make quite the splash by acquiring Sale, which would give them a dominating 1-2 punch with Sale and Max Scherzer, not to mention Stephen Strasburg. The Nationals have the pieces to pull off such a deal, but they’ve reportedly been unwilling to trade their top prospect, Trea Turner, a 23-year-old who slashed .342/.370/.567 in 307 at-bats after getting called up last season. He can play second base, shortstop and center field. Oh, and he also stole 33 bases.

But Sale is no slouch himself. He’s finished in the top six in AL Cy Young voting in each of the last five seasons. And then there's his salary. He’s owed $12 million for 2017, with club options for each of the following two seasons at $12.5 million and $13.5 million. That’s three years for $38 million. Compare that with top free-agent pitcher Rich Hill, who is 10 years older than Sale and reportedly got a three-year, $48 million contract when he signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers on Monday. This is one of the weakest free-agent classes for starting pitchers we’ve ever seen.

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On the surface, the White Sox hold all the cards. But so far teams are holding onto their top prospects like gold and have been unwilling to deal them even for one of the best pitchers in the game.

Knowing what Sale has meant to the franchise, Reinsdorf admitted "it will be very hard to trade him."

For it to happen, the White Sox don’t sound like they are willing to put Sale in the clearance section.

"We’d have to really feel we were coming back with a lot of goods, a lot of merchandise," Reinsdorf said.

But for the first time, the White Sox are open to trading Sale, an idea few could fathom a year ago.

"I’ve said it many, many times, I’ve only had one player that couldn’t be traded (Michael Jordan), and the only reason he couldn’t be traded was that I would have been shot dead the day after,” Reinsdorf said. “We love our players, and we want our players when their careers are over to say that 'the best place I played was with the White Sox.' But again our obligation is to the fans to make our teams as good as we can make them, and we have to look at the players basically as assets and if we can make a team better by trading somebody no matter how much we love the guy, we have to go ahead and do it.

"Having said that, I don’t know what’s going to happen here."