Somebody has to lose

Somebody has to lose

Thursday, June 10, 2010
11:39 PM

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

That can hurt, but its the truth. You cant have a winner without a loser. For a certain someone behind the bar at a world famous Chicago steakhouse those two sides could not be more apparent after the Stanley Cup Finals. For a long time Ive been able to avoid the ultimate conflict here, but in a life full of strange twists, this was just another. The main source of my angst has been my feelings for both sides. The team Ive followed all of my life, against the one of my new hometown. The point of being a fan is in your emotional investment. Why else would we watch? With this investment comes a connection and that is where the joy, or pain (trust me!) comes from. I think at some point that I will realize that, as a fan, Ive been a part of, and witnessed, something very special. In fact, I think I do understand whats going on and thats why, for me, its so disappointing. I understand what it takes for a team just to get to the Finals and how hard it is. For these two teams, besides their long championship droughts, it had been 18 and 13 years respectively since their last appearance in the ultimate stage. Thats why the ability to capitalize on that opportunity meant so much.

The magical run that the Flyers had is one of the wildest rides that Ive been able to witness. How could you not love that team? Counted out, time after time, they refused to die and showed a resilience, and will to win, that was inspiring. That is the type of thing that captures the imagination of a fan base and a city. Its something that many can identify with, especially a city with a chip on its shoulder. I know its easy for some to bash Philly fans for their behavior, but I dont think its that easy. For most are not knuckleheads, theyre just normal fans that are devoted to entities that rarely provide a happy ending. (ONE in 27 years!) Wouldnt that drive you a little crazy, or make you the slightest bit cynical? Thats why this team brought out so many emotions, it was somewhat of a gift and every minute was cherished. We never quit on this team and they never quit on us. But never in any of our wildest imaginations would we have seen them going this far. But as they say, be wary of the smiling face. Fate can be cruel, even more so when you invest yourself in the cumulative efforts of others playing a game.

But it also can deliver beyond your wildest dreams. When I moved here 15 years ago to say that the fan base was minimal and disillusioned would be putting it nicely. Three years ago, when Rocky Wirtz took over, this team and orgin-I-zation, was put on a path that was destined for greatness. For the long suffering, and a hockey mad bartender from the east coast, it was a path worth following. Almost every decision made by this franchise from that time has been the right one. That is incredible. My favorite, besides the obvious all games must be on TV, was a re-established connection to the past. I often wonder why ALL franchises do not embrace their history like their fans do. The past should not be looked on as a burden, but a gift that should not be squandered. Watching the heroes from the past at the games, enjoying every minute of the action and being treated like royalty, I think has helped the connection that has been re-established in this city. That the team is loaded with talent and direction doesnt hurt either.

My point is its hard to root against what has happened here, but in the end, isnt that what its all about? You root for yours and against theirs? Thats what makes it fun. Unfortunately for yours truly, I was sitting right in the middle, or a little, all right a lot, towards the wrong side. . It will probably take me a while to sort through it all, but I cant be denied that I watched the whole thing grow and take form and was a part of it. On that end, the ride was very cool. That just about every person here in my life right now is ecstatic is also very cool. I know for a fact that the memories of this will only get better, but for every action, there is an equal and opposite one. So as I prepare to work behind the bar today, during a parade, Ill make sure everyone has fun and realizes how special this time is. But inside, there is a large part of me that cant help but feel a little jealous and still rue what might have been. With all due respect to Mr. Savard, I committed to someone else.

John Lackey sees Cubs lining up for World Series run: ‘It’s all here’

John Lackey sees Cubs lining up for World Series run: ‘It’s all here’

PITTSBURGH — The Cubs have so much going for them, all this blue-chip talent, a clubhouse mix of young players and grizzled veterans, arguably the best manager in the game, an impactful coaching staff and a front office that blends scouting and analytics as well as anyone.

So, no, John Lackey is not at all surprised by the way this clicked into place, 101 wins and counting for the machine built with October in mind.

“Not really,” Lackey said after Tuesday night’s 6-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates. “I had some pretty good offers from other people, and I chose this one for a reason. It’s all here.”

But to win the World Series — and get the jewelry Lackey talks about — you still need some luck, good health and the guts to perform in those Big Boy Games. That reality of randomness and matchups made a pregame announcement some 250 miles away from PNC Park so telling.

Washington Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos tore the ACL in his right knee, ending his MVP-caliber season. The National League East champions will lose a .307 hitter with 22-homer power from the middle of their lineup and a veteran presence for a playoff rotation that will likely be without injured ace Stephen Strasburg (right elbow) in the first round.

“That’s a tough one when you lose your catcher, a guy who’s that significant for the pitching staff,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said. “Think about the pitching staff — it’s so different when you know the guy back there is your guy and he knows what’s going on. The communication’s different. The trust factor, all that stuff is different.”

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Within that big-picture context, the Cubs survived as Lackey limited the checked-out Pirates (77-80) to one run across five innings in his fifth start since recovering from a strained right shoulder and coming off the disabled list. Maddon then used six different relievers — staying away from Pedro Strop, Hector Rondon and Aroldis Chapman — during a three-hour, 49-minute game that felt more like the Cactus League.

After defecting from the 100-win St. Louis Cardinals team the Cubs bounced out of last year’s playoffs, Lackey finished the regular season at 11-8 with a 3.35 ERA and 188 1/3 innings.

“I’m going to get to 200,” Lackey said.

Beyond wins and losses, Lackey called this season his career best in terms of “those numbers that they’ve made up in the last few years” like WHIP (1.04) and opponents’ OPS (.646) and whatever. And, no, he doesn’t know his WAR, either: “Not even close.”

Yes, the Cubs got the old-school attitude they wanted when they signed Lackey to a two-year, $32 million deal before the winter meetings. For all the talk about the pitching deficit and the New York Mets after their young guns swept the Cubs out of last year’s NL Championship Series, the Cubs are getting their money’s worth with a guy who will turn 38 in October.

The amazing Mets have lost three of those frontline starters — Matt Harvey (thoracic outlet syndrome), Jacob deGrom (nerve damage in his right elbow) and Steven Matz (bone spur in his left elbow) — and are still holding onto the first wild-card spot, which says something about this playoff field.

This doesn’t guarantee anything in October, but the Cubs are just about as close to full strength as they could reasonably hope now. Instead of the silence that would have come with losing an irreplaceable player like Ramos, the sound system in the postgame clubhouse blasted Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre and Notorious B.I.G. after their 101st win.

“Yeah, we lost Dexter (Fowler) for a bit,” Maddon said. “We lost (Kyle) Schwarber all year. Otherwise, when a couple pitchers got banged up, whether you’re talking about Rondon or Strop, I don’t think that our injuries have been as magnified because we’ve covered them pretty well.

“We still had our moments, like everybody else has. But when you get to right now, we’re getting well, and hopefully that trend continues. But to lose somebody of that magnitude for them, that’s got to be difficult.”

Kyle Fuller heads to injured reserve as Bears make other roster moves

Kyle Fuller heads to injured reserve as Bears make other roster moves

The upheaval that has afflicted the 2016 Bears roster ratcheted up a notch late Tuesday when the Bears placed cornerback Kyle Fuller on injured reserve due to a knee injury and shuffled the depth chart elsewhere.

The Bears waived tight end Greg Scruggs, who was making the switch to offense from the defensive line, and linebacker Jonathan Anderson, while moving linebacker John Timu from the practice squad to the 53-man roster. To fortify the defensive line, where nose tackle Eddie Goldman is down indefinitely with an ankle injury, the Bears signed CJ Wilson, a 2010 draft pick of the Green Bay Packers who has played for the Packers, Oakland Raiders and Detroit Lions, starting 19 of 78 career games played.

Fuller, the 14th-overall pick of the 2014 draft and once identified as a building block of the Bears defense, underwent knee surgery Aug. 15 while the team went to New England for practices and a preseason game with the Patriots. He had been making significant strides in recovery as far as straight-ahead running but was still hampered with change-of-direction.

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Coach John Fox on Monday said simply that Fuller “has a sore knee. It has some medical things that kind of restrict you. When we get that healed up, he’ll go.”

The IR designation does not necessarily end Fuller’s season. Beginning in 2013, under an agreement between the NFL and Players Association, one player per team may be placed on injured reserve and later be brought back to the active roster. That player must sit out six weeks and cannot be activated for an additional two weeks.

With inside linebacker Danny Trevathan out following surgery on his thumb, Anderson had been expected to see additional playing time, possibly with the No. 1 unit. But rookie Nick Kwiatkoski started Sunday at Dallas in the base 3-4 and Christian Jones cycled in with sub packages.