They said it: 1993 Notre Dame-FSU in quotes

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They said it: 1993 Notre Dame-FSU in quotes

Tune in to Comcast SportsNet Thursday night at 7:00 p.m. for a Notre Dame football classic: The 1993 "Game of the Century" which pitted No. 2 Notre Dame against No. 1 Florida State in South Bend. Also, be sure to check out a look back on the game here. Below are some quotes from right after the game and from players who spoke to CSNChicago.com this week about their experiences in it.
 
"It's one game that I think lived up to all the hype." -- Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz (NBC broadcast)

"Those defensive backs they got back there, whenever they finish, and I hope it's soon, they'll be NFL." -- FSU coach Bobby Bowden (Sports Illustrated)

"I'd like to be Lou Holtz tonight. He'll have a good time." -- Bowden (SI)

"He's supposed to fall down on the other side of the field, but he comes all the way across and makes my block. He was moving pretty good for a man of his obesity." -- Notre Dame offensive lineman Todd Norman, on Aaron Taylor's block on Adrian Jarrell's touchdown run (SI)

"If we missed 100 tackles, I would not be surprised." -- FSU defensive end Derrick Alexander (SI)

"That was one thing coach Holtz taught us, not to worry about the defense. If we watch enough film, and he's going to put in the right plays it's just we have to execute. So it wasn't so much Derrick Brooks, it was what we as a team had to do. And it was like that all year, and we felt that we had a great team and if we executed our plays that no one could stop us." -- Notre Dame QB Kevin McDougal, on facing FSU's defense (CSNChicago.com)

"I just remember coming into the huddle and being like, uh, what did coach call my number? We have all these other guys in the backfield, Lee Becton had a tremendous game that day. And after scoring, I just remember turning around and seeing Oscar (McBride) and seeing Aaron Taylor and seeing Tim Ruddy and just hugging all those guys and just seeing the elation just from my teammates. Just a great moment. But the first thing I would say is, my thought was 'coach, you sure you want me running the ball in this situation?'" -- Irish DB Jeff Burris, on his thoughts when he found out his was going in to run the football (CSNChicago.com)

"None of us ever questioned whether or not we could count on Jeff in that situation. He was a captain, he had more than proven himself on both sides of the ball and with his character on and off the field. It's a really unique situation in a game that big, to have a guy to come in on your side of the ball that doesn't normally play there. It's like, you don't call that and think you're going to get a one-yard gain." -- Offensive lineman Aaron Taylor, on Burris getting the call to run (CSNChicago.com)

"When you talk about poise and just precision at that position -- just, you name it, he did it. If they needed 10 yards to run, he could scramble and look like, okay, he only went five yards but he probably went 20. He was that smooth with the ball in his hand. When you have an opportunity to play against guys like that and you come out and you play well as a team. As a team, as a defense, we clicked for it. For that day, we clicked completely. And those are the type of games you don't forget." -- Burris, on facing 1993 Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward (CSNChicago.com)

"The inference was, of course, that we were whooping his ass and he went out of the game. That's a very biased Notre Dame perspective -- I have tremendous respect for Derrick, I've know him pretty well, I played against him a lot when I was with Green Bay and he was with Tampa." -- Taylor, on Derrick Brooks missing some of the game with an ankle injury (CSNChicago.com)

"I just remember, we felt like we were on top of the world. That moment, and going over the student section. My roommates ran on the field, I remember, my old roommates from freshman year and came and gave me a big hug -- just those small things that you're just like man, we did it. It wasn't a team thing. It was a school thing at that moment. I remember Brian Hamilton, Bryant Young, and Bobby Taylor and I all stayed in the same dorm, and when we got back to the dorm we got an ovation just from our dorm-mates. It was overwhelming, overwhelming to say the least." -- Burris on his memories of after the game (CSNChicago.com)

"There's a picture I have, it's among my favorites. It's not even a picture of me, it's a picture of Justin Goheen, but I'm in the background and you can kind of see my head -- and you know, I'm maybe four, five feet behind him. But I keep it because it captures, for me, the emotion in that moment, and I look very juvenile, like I had this look of joy and pleasure and wonder, almost like a little kid.

"I see myself as a little kid in that picture, and the further that I went on in my career, and the higher up the levels I went, football became pressure-filled. Games were a relief. Rarely did you enjoy the game -- you always wanted to win, but it was more about sweet, we got that one under our belt, let's go on to next week. That one was special, and we had just beaten the No. 1 team in the country, it was a complete team effort, our playmakers stepped up." -- Aaron Taylor, on the postgame celebration (CSNChicago.com)

Back with White Sox, Carlos Sanchez handled demotion well

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Back with White Sox, Carlos Sanchez handled demotion well

BALTIMORE -- He may have been disappointed when he was sent to Charlotte last month, but Carlos Sanchez hasn’t let it affect his play.

Sanchez’s play at Triple-A has been so good that he’s back with the White Sox, at least temporarily.

The White Sox promoted the middle infielder on Thursday after they placed closer David Robertson on the bereavement list. Sanchez, who appeared in 120 games for the White Sox last season, is hitting .309/.356/.469 with three home runs and nine RBIs in 89 plate appearances at Charlotte.

“It’s never a good feeling for a guy trying to make the team,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “He played well enough in spring training, but you make decisions based on what you need on the roster and it’s a tough one. But he’s always handled that well. Any time he’s gone down there he has gotten his work in.”

Sanchez said he tries to avoid looking at the big picture, which helps him remain focused on a daily basis. After they acquired Brett Lawrie and Todd Frazier in the offseason, the White Sox no longer had an everyday role for Sanchez, who spent most of last season at the starting second baseman. Because he’s only 23, the White Sox told Sanchez they wanted him to play every day and continue to improve. He has taken the message to heart.

“They don’t want to keep me here just to be on the bench,” Sanchez said. “They need me to play every day to keep developing my game, and I took it.

“I feel really good. My game is really good right now, so I’m just going to try to help the team. Whatever they need, I’m going to be there for my team.”

 

Cubs getting precautionary MRI on Kris Bryant's ankle

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Cubs getting precautionary MRI on Kris Bryant's ankle

While the big-picture injury concerns revolved around the pitching staff heading into this World Series-or-bust season, the Cubs have already lost one of their best hitters for the year (Kyle Schwarber) and just placed a two-time All-Star catcher on the disabled list (Miguel Montero). The 162-game schedule is a war of attrition. 

The Cubs framed the MRI on Kris Bryant’s right ankle as a precautionary move after pulling the National League’s reigning Rookie of the Year from Thursday’s 7-2 win over the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field.

Manager Joe Maddon said “I honestly don’t know” if Bryant will miss more time with what the Cubs initially described as a mild sprain. “I don’t even want to create conjecture. Let’s just see what happens. Let’s look at the test.” 

Brewers starter Taylor Jungmann (0-4, 9.15 ERA) drilled Bryant with two pitches that didn't appear to bother him that much. Bryant rolled his ankle while running the bases after a third-inning single and got replaced by Javier Baez in the fifth.

Bryant is hitting .289 and is second on the team in homers (four) and runs scored (17) and tied for second in RBI (15). He played in 151 out of 154 possible games after his Triple-A Iowa service-time detour to begin last season, delaying his free agency by a year. 

Beyond the power, Maddon views Bryant as one of the game’s best baserunners and a versatile defender who can move from third base to anywhere in the outfield. 

White Sox will be without closer David Robertson until Sunday

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White Sox will be without closer David Robertson until Sunday

BALTIMORE -- The White Sox feel like they’re in the best position possible to handle the temporary loss of David Robertson, who they’ll be without until Sunday.

The White Sox closer has been placed on the bereavement list to attend the funeral of his father-in-law, who passed away earlier this week after battling cancer.

Robertson -- who has eight saves in nine tries and a 0.87 ERA with 13 strikeouts in 10 1/3 innings this season -- closed out Wednesday night’s four-run win over the Toronto Blue Jays even though it wasn’t a save opportunity. He joined his family on Thursday, which allowed the White Sox time to promote both Daniel Webb and infielder Carlos Sanchez. Sanchez replaced Robertson on Thursday while Webb joined the team on Wednesday after Miguel Gonzalez was optioned back to Triple-A Charlotte.

“We knew a few days ago, so I thought he handled it great,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “As tough as the news is, he knew he was going to need three days. He was with us for a couple of days after he got the news. He pitched in a game and gave us the opportunity to kind of maneuver a little bit. For him to get through this, all the way around it was the best you could hope for.”

The White Sox have utilized a 13-man pitching staff for a big chunk of their current stretch, which includes 19 games in 19 days. But with an off day around the corner, the White Sox chose to go back to a 12-man staff and call upon Sanchez, who could be necessary if any of their four games against the Baltimore Orioles are rained out.

Though Nate Jones is a likely option at closer, Ventura didn’t commit to how he’d manage his ‘pen in Robertson’s absence. He also listed Matt Albers and Zach Duke as potential options. And, Zach Putnam and Jake Petricka have experience in the role dating back to the 2014 season.

Jones picked up his first career save during the team’s last homestand.

“We just talked about treating it just like any other inning, no matter who it is,” Jones said. “We have to close out the sixth, we have to close out the seventh. Even though it’s the final three outs of the game, it’s a little bit different. A lot of people put emphasis on it. But that’s what we’re going to try and do -- just treat it like it’s the whatever inning.”

The White Sox bullpen has been outstanding this season. The group leads the major leagues with a 1.32 ERA. Over the past nine games, White Sox relievers have only allowed two earned runs in 24 2/3 innings (0.73 ERA).

“Those guys have handled it as well as you can,” Ventura said. “They feel for Robby. In a lot of ways they want to help him out as well. Robby is a good teammate and part of this is being able to flow with it. I think these guys are going to step up. That’s what you do.”