Thursday Score visit: Of death scenes & paper cuts

935537.png

Thursday Score visit: Of death scenes & paper cuts

It wouldnt be 10 a.m. Thursday without checking in with The McNeil and Spiegel Show on WSCR-AM The Score 670, Danny Mac and Ben Finfer this morning sitting in for Spiegs.

A little fun with great death scenes from movies, which the guys were chatting up when I joined them. The shark getting it in Jaws by Ben was a good call, as was Jack Dawson sinking into the depths of the North Atlantic.

My big three? Denzel Washington being taken out at the end of Training Day (richly deserved, as Mac correctly stated); Sonny Corleone getting his at the toll booth; and Val Kilmers Doc Hollidays one-shot takedown of Michael Biehns Johnny Ringo in Tombstone (Johnny wasnt a daisy after all).

The J.J. Watt problem was of more pressing interest for the week, and my sense of Watt continues to be a version of Dan Hampton and Julius Peppers, a defensive end with the power, strength and talent to drop inside and at any position to create a mismatch. Peppers has done it since he came to Chicago; Hampton went from left end to nose in the 46 (he also was defensive player of the year at D-tackle); and Watt at 290 pounds and 6-6 does the same.

Solution? There is none. Jury-rigging your offense to deal with that is a mistake, especially for an offense still forming. The Bears absolutely must run the ball (the Texans are good enough to dial Brandon Marshall down) and that is what they want to do and do well. This will be about whether the Bears can do their thing well.

Where is the bleeding coming from?

My thought to Mac was that the Bears offense is not hemorrhaging; its bleeding from a dozen paper cuts. A Kellen Davis drop cut then a Gabe Carimi breakdown cut then a Jay Cutler ball-hold cut then. You get the idea.

And coordinator Mike Tice has had some cuts. Abandoning later calls in the game plan because of a first-play sack, occasional lapses Tice knows what he wants to do and what wins. His role model as much as any is legendary Chuck Knox, and that means make your passing game truly lethal through ground supremacy.

Tice is excellent at looking for input and fresh ideas. Sometimes he just needs to trust that his have been pretty good over the past couple years and go with that.

And the pick for this weekend? Mac hadnt been able to make a pick so I wont, either. My preseason call was a loss to Houston and win at San Francisco; have to look at the first of those really close in the next day or two.

Mike Tirico and Dhani Jones join Notre Dame's NBC broadcast team

usatsi_8867391.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

Mike Tirico and Dhani Jones join Notre Dame's NBC broadcast team

Newly acquired NBC analyst Mike Tirico will serve as the play-by-play commentator for three Notre Dame games this season, NBC Sports announced Tuesday.

Tirico, who left ESPN after 25 years and joined NBC in May, will call Notre Dame's games against Nevada, Michigan State and Duke in September.

Lead announcer Dan Hicks will be on assignment for NBC Sports' coverage of the Fed-Ex Cup Playoffs. Hicks will return to his post for Notre Dame's final four home games of the season, including Stanford, Miami, Army and Virginia Tech.

After his time covering Notre Dame, Tirico will serve as the host of NBC's Football Night in America.

It was also announced that Dhani Jones will join the NBC pregame and halftime analyst Liam McHugh. Jones spent 11 seasons in the NFL after playing linebacker for the University of Michigan.

Notre Dame adjusts to schedule disruption of Sunday opener

Notre Dame adjusts to schedule disruption of Sunday opener

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- It’s been 20 years since Notre Dame last played a non-Saturday regular season game, which was a 14-7 win at Vanderbilt on Thursday, Sept. 5, 1996. A good chunk of Notre Dame’s current roster wasn’t born yet when that game took place. 

So Sunday night’s season opener against Texas presents some logistical challenges for Notre Dame not only for this week, but in having next week’s Nevada preparation shortened by a day. 

Coach Brian Kelly, though, does have some experience opening a season on a day that isn’t the usual Saturday. Kelly’s Cincinnati Bearcats beat Rutgers on Labor Day in 2009, then had to get ready for a game five days later (which fortunately was against FCS side Southest Missouri State, resulting in a 70-3 Cincinnati win). 

Notre Dame gave its players Monday off this week and won’t leave for Austin until late Friday. Saturday will then have the team’s usual Friday activities, with a bonus that players won’t have to get up early to go to class before traveling — they’ll already be there, so they can sleep in and get more rest before playing on Sunday. 

“I like it,” Kelly said. “I think the guys enjoy getting a little extra rest, extra treatments. And so I think it comes at a good time for our team.”

Where the challenge lies is next week, when the team won’t get back to South Bend until the early hours of the morning Monday. Classes are in session at Notre Dame on Labor Day, and then practice, film study, meetings, etc. for Nevada still has to fit in the usual Tuesday-Friday window, though that will probably have to be tweaked a bit. 

“Generally where it affects you more is on that next week is where you really have to be careful,” Kelly said. “Because we'll get back in at 4 a.m. Monday and then we play Nevada that Saturday. So my concern is usually around the flip side of it, because you adjust your schedule a little bit.”

The growing problem with high school football scheduling

The growing problem with high school football scheduling

Last Friday afternoon Joliet Catholic loaded its team and coaches into "yellow rockets" and headed to Franklin, Wis., on Opening Night. Both Lincoln-Way East and Lincoln-Way Central headed to Indiana to play games.

Hinsdale Central hosted American Fork. American Fork, located just south of Salt Lake City, traveled to Hinsdale play the Red Devils.

Play in a conference such as the DuPage Valley, which needs to find non-conference games outside of the first two weeks of the season? Then much like Waubonsie Valley (Week 7 @ Fishers (Hamilton Southeastern), Neuqua Valley (Week 5 at Indianapolis Bishop Chartard) or Naperville Central (Week 6 at national power Lakewood Ohio St. Edward) you too will be on the road out-of-state.

Finding a few non-conference games to play is becoming an adventure.

Scheduling continues to be a growing problem for many IHSA football programs. Between the pressures of getting into the state playoffs along with a conference system that also seems to be imploding by the week state-wide, something needs to get sorted out sooner than later.

How about some possible solutions?

Some have suggested expanding the IHSA state playoff field, thus making the need to schedule "five wins to get in" less of a focus for teams across the state. Yet ask any high school coach and a large majority of them have a real issue with an "everyone-gets-in" system. Letting everyone into the IHSA state football playoffs would ease scheduling but also eliminates what many coaches feel makes the IHSA football playoffs special, which is making a regular season schedule actually count.

Conferences? These days more and more conferences, many of which have decades of history and tradition, are breaking apart. From the North and Western suburbs, which have already seen new realignments to the soon-to-be powder keg located in the South and Southwestern suburbs, expect even more scrambling for teams to find games.

How about letting the IHSA take over scheduling? Again some have suggested that the IHSA handle state-wide scheduling and make football much like other IHSA sports, such as football conferences becoming more like regionals. Yet this plan would eliminate well established conferences such as the Chicago Catholic League and others who would want to maintain its history.

Yet one thing seem to becoming much clearer these days as more and more schools head to all points to play games: something needs to change when it comes to scheduling.