Tiger gets a win ... but is he back for good?

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Tiger gets a win ... but is he back for good?

From Comcast SportsNet
BETHESDA, Md. (AP) -- The images of Tiger Woods, dressed in his red shirt and raising both arms on the 18th green after another victory, are no longer highlights from years gone by. When he outlasted Bo Van Pelt in a tense duel on the back-nine Sunday at Congressional, Woods won for third time in his last seven tournaments dating to the late March. He still hasn't figured out the majors this year, though he has two more remaining. And while winning the AT&T National kept him at No. 4 in the world, he is starting to be looked upon the way he once was. "I think he's the only guy to win three tournaments on tour this year, is that correct?" Van Pelt said. "On three different courses. And he was leading the U.S. Open after two days. So I'd say that he's playing the best golf in the world right now." Woods closed with a 2-under 69, making only one bogey in his final 44 holes on a course that was tougher than it was for the U.S. Open last year. Van Pelt had him in trouble late in the round, but only briefly, and Woods effectively pulled away on the last two holes by letting his opponents get the bad breaks and make the bogeys. He now was 74 wins on the PGA Tour, moving past Jack Nicklaus into second place, leaving him eight wins away from the record held by Sam Snead. Perhaps it's only fitting that Woods now heads to The Greenbrier Classic, where Snead was the first head professional. Woods at least moved to No. 1 in two other categories -- the PGA Tour money list and the FedEx Cup standings, for the first time since September 2009. At this rate, Woods is more likely to get to Snead's record of 82 tour wins than the record that means the most to him -- the 18 majors won by Nicklaus. Woods has been stuck on 14 since 2008 when he won the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines on a shattered left leg. "It feels great to get to 74 wins and obviously pass Jack," Woods said. "I did it at 36 years old, and it's something I'm very proud of." Not bad for a guy who only four months ago walked off the course at Doral with another injury to his left Achilles tendon. He returned two weeks later and won Bay Hill, and off he went. "I remember there was a time when people were saying I could never win again," Woods said. His latest win took a lot of effort. Brendon de Jonge, the 54-hole leader for the first time, didn't make a birdie and shot 77 to quickly fall out of contention. Adam Scott ran off four straight birdies on the front nine and was briefly part of a five-way tie for the lead until he made back-to-back bogeys on the back nine. Hunter Mahan also fell back. It came down to Woods and Van Pelt, who have known each other since junior golf and could not be any more different. Woods is high energy, who now has won an astounding 27 percent of the PGA Tour events he has played. Van Pelt is laid-back Oklahoman, whose only official tour win came three years ago in Milwaukee, a tournament that no longer exists. They didn't look much different on the golf course. Three times, Woods made birdie putts to take the lead. Three times, Van Pelt answered him. Woods holed a 20-foot birdie putt on 15th hole, extending his left arm to motion for the ball to go left, and when it did just that, he raised his arm with his index finger pointing to the sky. That put him at 9 under, a lead that lasted as long as it took Van Pelt to match him with a 10-foot birdie. The par-5 16th had the most surprising twist. Van Pelt blistered a tee shot 345 yards down the middle of the fairway, leaving only a 6-iron to the green. Woods hit a spectator with his tee shot in the left rough, had to lay up, and then was too aggressive with his wedge and went over the green and down an 8-foot slope. It was a like a pitcher in a tied baseball game who loaded the bases with no one out, only to get out of the jam. Van Pelt's approach was slightly heavy and stopped in the thick collar of a bunker, so that he had to chip with his feet in the sand and his hands gripping the steel shaft of the wedge. He didn't get out of the rough, and his third shot went to the back of the green, just over 12 feet away for par. Woods' fourth shot up the slope hit the hole and ran 15 feet away. Both hit good putts. Both missed. Both made bogey. They remained tied. "It was difficult from the standpoint I had my legs in the bunker, and if I hit that chip a little too hard it goes over the green because you can't put any spin on it," Van Pelt said. "I was just trying to get the ball up in the air and play it out to the right a little bit and just got underneath it a little bit. And the second one, I thought I hit it great. I was surprised it rolled that far. And the putt, I mean, I've probably never hit a better putt than that in my life under those kind of circumstances. "I pretty much hit every shot the way I wanted to that hole, just ended up being 6." On the next hole, Van Pelt was in the left cut of rough and caught a flier, with a good swing getting a bad result. The ball shot out of the fluffy grass over the green, leaving him no chance to get near the hole. He went through the green and had to scramble for bogey, and Woods chipped up to 6 feet and made his putt for par to take a one-shot lead to the 18th. "It's rare that we caught any fliers out here at all this week, and Bo caught one coming out of that rough," Woods said. "We had a good enough lie where we could have had one of those, but Bo caught one out of there and put it in the wrong spot and made bogey, and I got up and down." Woods with a one-shot lead on the 18th, playing in control as he had for so much of the day, is tough to beat. He hit a fade off the tee. He hit a draw with a 9-iron into the green. He won. And everyone was there to see it. The AT&T National was a strange week -- record heat on Friday, followed by a violent wind storm that night that toppled trees and littered Congressional with limbs. The course was closed to spectators on Saturday, leading to an eerily quiet afternoon with Woods in contention. The spectators returned by the thousands on Sunday, and they got want they wanted to see. "I think everyone kept it pent up for today, and it was raucous all day," Woods said. Van Pelt was disappointed at making three straight bogeys for a 71, though he took away plenty of good feelings about the way he played on such a big stage. "He's an amazing player," Van Pelt said. "We've known each other a long time, probably 20 years. He's fun to play with. That's why you travel 30 weeks a year, why you get up in the morning and make the sacrifices that you do, to have the opportunity to play the best player in the world in the final round with a chance to win."

Why Kyle Schwarber is untouchable and how Cubs plan to rebuild bullpen

Why Kyle Schwarber is untouchable and how Cubs plan to rebuild bullpen

NEW YORK – Let’s start with this boilerplate Theo Epstein quote and file it away for the next time Kyle Schwarber’s name appears on MLBTradeRumors.com or a fantasy-baseball proposal for the New York Yankees.

“I’m looking forward to Kyle Schwarber — who got hurt in a Cubs uniform and is working his ass off in a Cubs uniform — coming back and hitting a very big home run in a Cubs uniform sometime very early next season,” Epstein said.

The president of baseball operations clearly has a special bond with Schwarber, selecting the Indiana University catcher/outfielder with the fourth overall pick in the 2014 draft, back when the industry consensus made it sound like a reach. Schwarber helped ignite those champagne celebrations last year by setting a franchise record with five postseason home runs. Epstein felt sick watching Schwarber wreck his knee in an outfield collision during the first week of this season, allowing him to rehab in Chicago and hang out in the draft room, essentially viewing him as an untouchable player because of his left-handed power and leadership qualities.

The Mets are the defending National League champs — with all due respect, as Joe Maddon might say, quoting Will Ferrell’s Ricky Bobby character in “Talladega Nights.” But the Yankees might be the New York team the Cubs should focus on now.

While the Mets returned home to Citi Field on Thursday as a third-place team — six games behind Washington after getting swept at Nationals Park — the Yankees will be in no man’s land on July 1 at 39-39.

The Bronx Bombers now have another month to decide whether or not they will become trade-deadline sellers for the first time in a generation, how breaking up the Andrew Miller/Aroldis Chapman/Dellin Betances bullpen could set them up for the future. And what surrender would mean for a YES Network/Yankee Stadium/27 World Series titles business plan. 

Epstein viewed Thursday’s action – the San Diego Padres flipped closer Fernando Rodney to the Miami Marlins while the Los Angeles Dodgers acquired right-hander Bud Norris from the Atlanta Braves – as more of a reaction to the July 2 international signing period (and Clayton Kershaw’s back injury) than a sign that the market would start to move quickly.

“We’re talking to clubs, just trying to see who might be available and where we might have matches,” Epstein said. “But there’s nothing real imminent. There’s usually a flurry of activity around (this time). Despite the trades today, I think it might end up being more of a slow-developing market. We’ll see. We’re not close to anything.”

Remember, the Cubs rebuilt their bullpen on the fly last summer with Clayton Richard (acquired for a dollar from the Pittsburgh Pirates’ Triple-A affiliate), Trevor Cahill (released by the Braves and Dodgers before signing a minor-league deal) and Rodney (a two-time All-Star the Seattle Mariners had designated for assignment).

While Schwarber-for-Miller buzz is great on talk radio and Twitter, for now the Cubs will go with the grab-bag approach, looking at internal options like Carl Edwards Jr. and Joel Peralta, hoping for good news on their Tommy John cases (Joe Nathan, Jack Leathersich) and waiting for Justin Grimm to get locked in again.

“It’s pretty rare that you rebuild a bullpen midseason through big-ticket items,” Epstein said. “Last year was actually more typical. They don’t all work out — that’s not what I’m saying. But if you have a plan and a process — and you’re willing to kind of cycle through guys (and) ride things out — you often get rewarded in the end.

“For a postseason bullpen, if you’re thinking that far in advance, you’re not talking about eight guys. You’re talking about three or four guys that you can lean on heavily. It’s being open-minded, being willing to let guys ride through their downturns and make adjustments, so that they can find it.” 

Minor League Roundup: Cubs, Sox prospects get ready for Futures Game

Minor League Roundup: Cubs, Sox prospects get ready for Futures Game

Each week, CSNChicago.com goes down on the farm for a minor-league report from both the Cubs and White Sox system, presented by Service King.

WHITE SOX

A pair of Charlotte Knights have made the Triple-A All-Star game in the International League. Matt Davidson and Leury Garcia will represent the Knights in the All-Star game on July 13.

Davidson, a 25-year-old third baseman, is batting .268/.349/.444 in 75 games this season with 10 homers and 46 RBIs – both leading the club. This will also be Davidson’s third career All-Star appearance. It’s possible he could miss the game, as he was promoted to the big leagues on Thursday, where he promptly broke his foot in his first game.

Garcia is batting .315/.366/.393 on the year with two homers, 18 RBI and a team-leading 12 stolen bases. It’s his first career All-Star selection.

Though Carson Fulmer has been struggling this season, the White Sox top prospect will pitch in the All-Star Futures Game on July 10 in San Diego.

In 75 innings this season in Double-A Birmingham, Fulmer has a 5.28 ERA with 44 walks and 75 strikeouts.

Zack Collins’ college career ended last week after the Miami Hurricanes got eliminated from the College World Series, but his pro career could get underway next week.

The White Sox first-round selection in this year’s draft will take some time to rest and then report to the team’s Glendale, Ariz. facility on July 2. The 21-year-old catcher will eventually start at Single-A Winston-Salem.

The White Sox also signed Tony Campana to a minor league deal on Thursday. The 30-year-old outfielder was released by the Washington Nationals on Monday.

Campana spent last season with the White Sox but sat out the entire season with a torn ACL.

CUBS

As All-Star week approaches in the majors, the minor-league All-Star games are getting underway.

At the Triple-A level, Cubs prospects Daniel Vogelbach and Armando Rivero were named to the Pacific Coast League All-Star team.

Rivero - a 28-year-old right-handed pitcher - has been in the Cubs' system since 2013 and has a 2.39 ERA and 1.142 WHIP this season. He has also struck out 49 batters in 37.2 innings.

Vogelbach has been making headlines among Cubs prospects all season. The 23-year-old first baseman has been absolutely raking, posting a .308/.422/.556 slash line on the season with 15 doubles, 15 homers and 55 RBI in 73 games. 

Over the last month, Vogelbach has taken his game to another level, hitting .323 with a 1.098 OPS, driving in 22 runs in 28 games on 16 extra-base hits (8 homers, 7 doubles, 1 triple) and has also drawn 18 walks compared to only 18 strikeouts. 

Meanwhile, Iowa third baseman Jeimer Candelario is headed to the Futures Game, which will be played in San Diego the day before the MLB Home Run Derby.

Candelario, 22, started the season in Double-A (where he hit just .219), but has been killing the ball since his promotion to Triple-A, hitting .344 with a 1.079 OPS in 21 games.

In the Futures Game last season, Kyle Schwarber took home MVP honors.

Elsewhere in the Cubs system, big-league pitcher Adam Warren continued to get stretched out to return to the parent club as a starting pitcher. Warren tossed five innings (73 pitches) Thursday for Triple-A Iowa, allowing two runs on three hits and striking out three.

He may be back up to the majors next week, at which time the Cubs will insert him into the starting rotation.

Preview: White Sox take on the Astros Friday on CSN

Preview: White Sox take on the Astros Friday on CSN

The White Sox take on the Houston Astros on Friday, and you can catch all the action on Comcast SportsNet. Coverage begins at 7 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Friday’s starting pitching matchup: Miguel Gonzalez vs. Mike Fiers

Click here for a game preview to make sure you’re ready for the action.  

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