Tiger's coach set to publish tell-all book

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Tiger's coach set to publish tell-all book

From Comcast SportsNet
KAPALUA, Hawaii (AP) -- Hank Haney has written a book about the six years he spent as Tiger Woods' swing coach, a volatile time in which Woods went from winning nearly half of his tournaments to a scandal that derailed his pursuit of golf history. "I get asked all the time about Tiger, what it was like to work with him," Haney said in a telephone interview. "I felt like I had a front row seat to golf history. It just kind of chronicles a little bit of what I went through, what I dealt with, how I coached and the observations I made." Haney began working with Woods at the Bay Hill Invitational in 2004. They parted ways a month after the 2010 Masters, where Woods made his return to golf after being exposed for multiple extramarital affairs that shattered his image and led to divorce. Most of the people involved with Woods have signed a nondisclosure agreement. Haney said he signed no such thing -- "I didn't even have a contract," he said -- although he said the book was not intended to "take jabs at anyone." Mark Steinberg, Woods' agent at Excel Sports Management, said he was aware of the book 'The Big Miss' but that Woods had not seen any excerpts and would have no comment. Haney was asked whether he thought Woods will like it. "If he reads it, I don't think it will be a book that bothers him. It's hard to say," Haney said. "Anybody who reads it will think it's interesting, very fair and honest, and that's what I wanted to do. I was on that job for six years. There were 110 days a year I was with him. I stayed at his house for close to 30 days a year. You make a lot of observations." The book will be released by Crown Archetype, part of the Crown Publishing Group at Random House, Inc. It is scheduled to be published March 27 -- one week before the Masters -- and issued simultaneously in print and digital formats in the United States and Canada. Haney wrote the book with Jaime Diaz of Golf Digest, whose coverage dates to when Woods was a teenager and Diaz played golf with Woods and his father. Diaz also spoke at the memorial service for Earl Woods. He said the title was collaboration. "It has multiple meanings," Haney said. "The Big Miss' was golf jargon. The big miss of a drive, obviously that's been part of his game. The big miss of an opportunity? That's really where we got the idea. It was a missed opportunity that Tiger and I had that we experienced working together. That all comes out in the book." Haney was the second of three coaches Woods has used as a professional, though he was part of the most interesting times. He received more criticism than any coach, even though Woods won 29 times and six majors during their six years. "The period of time that I dealt with Tiger was much more unique, in terms of having the scandal, Torrey Pines with the broken leg at the U.S. Open, other things, too," Haney said. "It was a totally different time." Woods went nine months without winning after going to work with Haney. Starting with the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan at the end of the 2005 season, however, Woods won 46 percent of the tournaments he played worldwide. During their six years together, Woods got married and had two children. His father died in May 2006, and Woods missed the cut in a major for the first time at the U.S. Open a month later. As for the serial adultery, Haney said he didn't know about it and doesn't delve into that chapter of Woods' life in the book, except for his return from the scandal after going nearly five months without competition. "It's something you can't NOT talk about it," Haney said. "My last tournament was the Masters, and that was his first tournament back from the scandal. I didn't know anything about the girls. That's not something I could specifically comment on. Everything I comment on is what I observed and the facts I knew. I didn't know anything about that. "But I did know about how he interacted with me about that, what my observations were and other areas in terms of how I dealt with and the aftermath." The most compelling win under Haney came at the 2008 U.S. Open, when Woods learned he had a double stress fracture in left leg, along with torn ligaments in his left knee. Despite not competing for two months, he won in a playoff over Rocco Mediate. Haney recalled doctors telling Woods before that U.S. Open that he needed to spend three weeks on crutches, followed by three weeks of rest. Haney says Woods told the doctors, "I'm playing the U.S. Open, and I'm going to win." Pressed for examples of his observations in the book, Haney declined, not even to mention his favorite moment or the low point in his coaching relationship with Woods. Haney said he knew all along he would be writing a book. He worked primarily with Mark O'Meara, which is how he got to know Woods. Haney said from the day he first went to work with Woods, he knew that would be his last pro client. He took notes and kept his observations in diaries, then waited to find the right publisher and someone -- Diaz -- to help him with the book. Haney said he hasn't seen the finished product, but "we're very close." "It was an incredible opportunity," Haney said. "We had a great run and I enjoyed it, but a lot of things happened in six years that made it feel a little longer. I had a lot of great observations from being in the position I was in."

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Five Things from Blackhawks-Canucks: Corey Crawford rebounds

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The Blackhawks’ starts have been all over the map this season but their finishes have usually been strong. That was the case again on Sunday night as the Blackhawks took a lead, lost a lead and regained a lead for good in their 4-2 victory over the Vancouver Canucks.

This one featured a little bit of everything. So let’s just get to the Five Things to take from the Blackhawks’ victory over Vancouver.

1. Jonathan Toews breaks through. If the Blackhawks captain’s confidence was a little shaken with his lack of scoring this season, it should’ve gotten a boost with his Sunday outing. Toews’ goal and three assists were as big for him as they were the Blackhawks, who needed every bit of it late against the Canucks. In his last 12 games Toews has three goals and eight assists. He’s getting there. Said coach Joel Quenneville, “it seems like he was around the puck way more and when he does that, usually good things happen.”

2. Great start. This hasn’t been written very often but it was more than evident on Sunday night. If this wasn’t the Blackhawks’ best opening period of the season it was pretty close, as they broke out to a 2-0 lead against the Canucks. The Blackhawks, outside of a 3 ½-minute sequence without a shot on goal, were tenacious and ready to shoot, taking an 18-9 shots-on-goal edge in that first.

3. Corey Crawford rebounds. Quenneville considered Scott Darling for this game, an understandable thought with Darling coming off a 30-stop shutout. But he wanted Crawford to get back to where he was prior to his appendectomy, and Crawford took a step in that direction on Sunday night. In stopping 25 of 27 shots Crawford got his 18th victory of the season and 200th of his career. Quenneville said Crawford “looked like he was in control.”

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4. Michal Kempny’s tough stretch. When Kempny has been good this season he’s been very good. When he’s been bad... The defenseman was in the penalty box when the Canucks scored their first goal and he was beaten by Bo Horvat on the Canucks’ second goal. Kempny didn’t play the final 14 minutes of the game. Quenneville, who liked what Kempny brought on the team’s road trip, said Kempny just has to work through some things. “Coverage with awareness and knowing sometimes it’s man coverage, sometimes it’s playing the puck and clearing the loose stuff,” Quenneville said. “Defenseman is a tough position as you’re growing and learning it, but the more you play the better you play and I still think he’s making progress.”

5. Brian Campbell gets to keep No. 500 this time. Campbell thought he had his 500th point against the Colorado Avalanche on Tuesday night but it was taken away. Well he got it back on Sunday night, setting up Richard Panik’s 11th goal of the season in the first period.