Timeline of Kenny Williams' career


Timeline of Kenny Williams' career

The White Sox officially announced today that Kenny Williams, who spent the last 12 seasons as general manager, will now serve as the organization's executive vice president. It's been a long journey for Williams, who made plenty of stops around the country before landing in Chicago. Here's a timeline of Williams' career in the sports world.

-- June 7, 1982 - Selected by White Sox in 3rd round of 1982 June Amateur Draft out of Fort Pleasant HS in San Jose, CA. He did attend Stanford, but played only football there, where he was a teammate of John Elway.

-- September 2, 1986 - Williams makes Major League debut, going 1-4, singling off the Royals' Danny Jackson. Ozzie Guillen, a man he'd later hire as White Sox manager hit ahead of him in the order that day.

-- March 23, 1989 - Williams traded to the Tigers for pitcher Eric King

-- November 18, 1991 - Williams released by the Montreal Expos. His final ML game was October 4, 1991. He played with both Canadian franchises; the Blue Jays and the Expos in his final big league season.

-- 1992-93 - Williams started his post-playing career as a scout with the White Sox

-- 1994 - Williams served the White Sox as a special assistant to Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf

-- 1995-96 - Williams earned a promotion to Club Director of Minor League Operations

-- 1997-2000 - Williams took the next step forward as White Sox Vice President of Player Development

-- October 24, 2000 - Kenny Williams named White Sox General Manager, replacing Ron Schueler

-- October 26, 2005 - Under GM Williams, White Sox win first World Series since 1917

-- October 26, 2012 - Kenny Williams promoted to White Sox President of Baseball Operations

Notable signings & trades

-- November 30, 2000 - Jose Valentin signs as Free Agent (spent 2000 with Brewers)

-- January 14, 2001 - David Wells acquired with Matt DeWitt from Blue Jays for Mike Sirotka, Brian Simmons, Mike Williams, and Kevin Beirne

-- June 21, 2001 - Jose Canseco purchased from Newark of the Atlantic League

-- January 15, 2003 - Bartolo Colon acquired with Jorge Nunez from Expos for Rocky Biddle, Orlando Hernandez, Jeff Liefer, and cash

-- July 1, 2003 - Roberto Alomar acquired from Mets with Cash for Andrew Salvo, Edwin Almonte, and Royce Ring

-- November 4 2003 - Ozzie Guillen named White Sox manager

-- December 2, 2003 - Juan Uribe acquired from the Rockies for Aaron Miles

-- January 22, 2004 - Shingo Takatsu signs as Free Agent (spent 2003 with Yakult Swallows in Japan)

-- June 27, 2004 - Freddy Garcia acquired from Mariners with Ben Davis for Mike Morse, Miguel Olivo & Jeremy Reed

-- July 18, 2004 - Carl Everett acquired from Expos for Gary Majewski and Jon Rauch

-- July 31, 2004 - Jose Contreras acquired from Yankees for Esteban Loaiza

-- December 9, 2004 - Jermaine Dye signs as Free Agent (spent 2004 with Athletics)

-- December 13, 2004 - Scott Podsednik, Luis Vizcaino, and player to be named later (Travis Hinton) acquired from Brewers for Carlos Lee

-- December 17, 2004 - Bobby Jenks selected off waivers from Angels

-- January 3, 2005 - Orlando Hernandez signs as Free Agent (spent 2004 with Yankees)

-- January 6, 2005 - A.J. Pierzynski signs as Free Agent (spent 2004 with Giants)

-- January 27, 2005 - Tadahito Iguchi signs as Free Agent (spent 2004 with Fukuoka Daiei Hawks in Japan)

-- July 31, 2005 - Geoff Blum acquired from Padres for Ryan Meaux

-- November 25, 2005 - Jim Thome acquired from Phillies with cash for Aaron Rowand, Daniel Haigwood, and player to be named later (Gio Gonzalez)

-- December 20, 2005 - Javier Vazquez acquired from Diamondbacks for Orlando Hernandez, Luis Vizcaino, and Chris Young

-- March 20, 2006 - Matt Thornton acquired from Mariners for Joe Borchard

-- December 6, 2006 - Gavin Floyd & Gio Gonzalez acquired from Phillies for Freddy Garcia

-- December 23, 2006 - White Sox acquire John Danks, Nick Masset, and Jacob Rasner for Brandon McCarthy and David Paisano

-- November 19, 2007 - Orlando Cabrera acquired from Angels for Jon Garland

-- December 3, 2007 - Carlos Quentin acquired from Diamondbacks for Chris Carter

-- January 3, 2008 - Nick Swisher acquired from Athletics for Gio Gonzalez, Ryan Sweeney, and Fautino De Los Santos

-- January 18, 2008 - Alexei Ramirez signed as an amateur Free Agent

-- June 5, 2008 - Gordon Beckham drafted 8th overall out of the University of Georgia in the 2008 June Amateur Draft

-- July 31, 2008 - Acquired Ken Griffey Jr. from Reds in exchange for Danny Richar & Nick Masset

-- December 12, 2008 - Dayan Viciedo signed as an amateur Free Agent

-- July 31, 2009 - Acquired Jake Peavy from Padres in exchange for Clayton Richards, Adam Russell, Aaron Poreda, and Dexter Carter

-- August 10, 2009 - Selected Alex Rios off waivers from the Blue Jays

-- October 21, 2009 - Alejandro De Aza selected off waivers from the Marlins

-- June 7, 2010 - Chris Sale drafted 13th overall out of Florida Gulf Coast University in the 2010 June Amateur Draft

-- July 30, 2010 - Edwin Jackson acquired from Diamondbacks for Daniel Hudson and David Holmberg

-- December 3, 2010 - Adam Dunn signs as Free Agent (spent 2010 with Nationals)

-- October 6, 2011 - Robin Ventura named White Sox manager

-- June 24, 2012 - Kevin Youkilis acquired from Red Sox for Brent Lillibridge and Zach Stewart

-- July 28, 2012 - Francisco Liriano acquired from Twins for Eduardo Escobar and Pedro Hernandez

Report: Bears looking for Jay Cutler return against Vikings; Matt Barkley on stand-by

Report: Bears looking for Jay Cutler return against Vikings; Matt Barkley on stand-by

FOX insider Jay Glazer confirmed on Sunday that the Bears expect quarterback Jay Cutler will be back from his sprained thumb and able to start against the Minnesota Vikings next Monday night in Soldier Field.

That would put Matt Barkley back where he has been pretty much his entire three-plus-year NFL career. Waiting.

That's the Bears want what every team wants – a young quarterback in the developmental pipeline – is no secret. Ryan Pace is among the NFL executives who speak of drafting a quarterback as much as every year, even if they don’t.

Could the Bears already have that player on their roster?

If Barkley, who was pressed into service when Brian Hoyer went down with a broken arm in last Thursday’s loss to the Green Bay Packers, is in fact that player, he might not be surprised. But the rest of the NFL would be.

"I'm confident that no matter where I am or what the deal is,” Barkley said, after going 6-for-15 with no TD’s and two interceptions, “I can play in this league.”

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

He may be one of the few still holding onto that belief. The Bears picked up Barkley after the Arizona Cardinals discarded him in early September. The Cardinals didn’t see Barkley as even a practice-squad option, which the Bears did and where Barkley was working before Cutler’s thumb injury forced the Bears to sign him to the active roster.

“The [Bears] personnel people thought he was a taller [6-2] guy that stood in the pocket pretty well,” said coach John Fox. “A guy that we thought we could work with, that had some experience and, hopefully, he got a little bit more experience [at Green Bay].”

Barkley has gone from possible No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft to just another touted USC quarterback who failed or were no better than just-OK at the NFL level (Todd Marinovich, Rob Johnson, Matt Leinart, Mark Sanchez), who has thrown 65 NFL passes, none for a touchdown and six that were intercepted, including two in the Bears’ 26-10 loss last Thursday in Green Bay.

The question for Barkley at this point in his career is whether Chicago is his last stop and/or chance. Fourth-round draft picks have played their ways into prominence (Kirk Cousins in Washington, Dak Prescott in Dallas, even Sonny Jurgensen and Norm Van Brocklin if you want to find Hall of Famers), but Barkley has the added challenge of being on his third team and learning yet another offense after beginning this season running Houston and Philadelphia plays for the Bears’ defense.

Barkley offered no excuses for his poor showing (18.3 passer rating). Sort of.

“It definitely would be more beneficial [to have gotten more snaps before Green Bay],” Barkley said. “I’m not going to say what Coach should do; that’s his decision and you’ve got to deal with what you’re dealt.

“Just since I’ve been here, you know, scout-team reps and trying to put our plays into what we’re seeing on cards, you try to do every little thing you can to get better no matter what you’re doing. That’s no excuse.”

Buckeyes not dead by a long shot, but this much is clear: Michigan is Big Ten's top dog


Buckeyes not dead by a long shot, but this much is clear: Michigan is Big Ten's top dog

Make no mistake, Ohio State isn’t out of the championship running because it lost one game on an October night in Happy Valley.

But here’s perhaps the biggest thing we learned on Saturday night: Michigan is the team to beat in the Big Ten.

The Wolverines didn’t prove that all by themselves, of course, because a 41-8 win over lowly Illinois is nothing special to a team in the national-title hunt. But with the Buckeyes falling in stunning fashion to Penn State, a comparison can start to be drawn.

We got a glimpse last weekend, when Ohio State couldn’t turn in nearly the same shut-down performance against Wisconsin that Michigan had two weeks prior. The Wolverines almost completely silenced the Badgers when the two met in Ann Arbor, a 14-7 win for Michigan in which it looked absolutely unbeatable on the defensive side and was a few missed field goals away from holding a much bigger lead. In its matchup with Wisconsin, the Ohio State defense showed up, too, particularly after halftime. But the Badgers still scored more than triple the points they did against the Wolverines and racked up more than 300 yards in the first half alone. The Buckeyes won and looked good doing it, but they looked nowhere near as good as the Wolverines did.

Then came Saturday night, when Ohio State struggled on offense despite some good raw numbers in terms of yardage. And the Penn State defense pressured the heck out of Heisman candidate J.T. Barrett, sacking him six times including on Ohio State’s final two offensive plays of the evening. These Lions are the same that the Wolverines scorched by a 49-10 score in late September. Michigan allowed Penn State to gain just 191 total yards in that game and sacked Trace McSorley six times, all while scoring nearly 50 points on 515 total yards.

Now, a few points.

The main difference when it comes to comparing the two games against Wisconsin and Penn State is that Michigan was at home for both and Ohio State was on the road for both. That’s a big difference, sure.

But the other point is that the Wolverines are doing this to everybody. They are obliterating the competition. Outside of the Wisconsin game — a game against a top-11 team with one of the best defenses in college football — every win has been a blowout. Including the Wisconsin game, the average margin of victory is 38.7. Excluding it, the average margin of victory is 44.

Michigan ranks No. 1 in the country in scoring defense, allowing an average of 10 points a game, and ranks No. 3 in the country in scoring offense, averaging a whopping 48.7 points per game. There doesn’t seem to be a weakness to this team, and there are no “yeah, but” arguments to be found, especially after what Ohio State did against Wisconsin and Penn State, two teams Michigan effectively dominated.

Jim Harbaugh’s crew is barreling toward playing for a national championship, it would seem. Of course, those Buckeyes still stand in the way, and should Ohio State take care of its business between now and the regular season’s final week — easier said than done with undefeated Nebraska still on the schedule — then The Game will be the Big Ten title game play-in we all thought it would be.

That game will still be a clash of the titans. But right this second, there’s a favorite. And it’s Michigan.