Velasquez Stops Lesnar For UFC Title

310160.jpg

Velasquez Stops Lesnar For UFC Title

Sunday, October 24, 2010 1:58am

By GREG BEACHAM
, AP Sports WriterANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) -- Brock Lesnar was downright stunned when Cain Velasquez took his biggest shots, escaped his violent takedowns and just kept coming at him at UFC 121. The baddest man in mixed martial arts was locked in the cage with an opponent who was just as tough, even more skilled -- and totally unintimidated by his bad-boy aura. Four minutes later, Velasquez also was the UFC heavyweight champion. Velasquez stopped Lesnar late in the first round with a relentless flurry of punches Saturday night, claiming the title belt from the UFC's biggest star. "It's a great feeling to have the belt," the former Arizona State wrestler said calmly, looking down at the gaudy ornament on the podium before him. "Now the hard work comes in, definitely." Velasquez remained unbeaten and claimed MMA's highest-profile belt by beating the fearsome Lesnar at everything he does best. The UFC's top pay-per-view draw and champion for the past 23 months was largely helpless against Velasquez, who reduced him to a cowering defensive posture for the second half of their brief fight. Only a slight case of nerves even shook Velasquez at all. After a frenetic opening minute featuring huge blows by both fighters, Velasquez battled back from two takedowns and never stopped pursuing the bigger champion. "I felt great about the fight," Velasquez said. "We knew his game plan going in, and it kind of did surprise me how hard he came forward. I froze. I wasn't as relaxed as I should have been, but after that takedown he got on me, that's when I was able to say, 'Relax, relax.'" Velasquez eventually staggered Lesnar across the octagon, with Lesnar stumbling to the canvas several times. Lesnar (5-2) tried to cover up near the cage, but Velasquez mercilessly rained down blows on Lesnar and eventually broke his guard, forcing referee Herb Dean to stop the fight with 48 seconds left in the round. "He looked incredible tonight," said UFC President Dana White, who didn't seem disappointed to see his top attraction's demise. "The guy gets better every time he fights. He's incredibly well-rounded. I think he answered all the questions tonight." While Velasquez (9-0) scarcely made a mistake in the entire fight, Lesnar was left cut and seriously bloodied from Velasquez's punches. Several ringside observers thought they heard Lesnar verbally ask for the fight to be stopped, although Velasquez said he was too busy punching to hear it. "What can I say? He was better than me tonight," Lesnar said in the octagon. Velasquez exposed Lesnar's clear deficiencies in standup fighting, just as Shane Carwin did in his own shot at Lesnar in July. But Velasquez didn't punch himself into exhaustion, as Carwin did in Las Vegas, instead being more judicious about his strikes. "We just had to pick our shots," Velasquez said. "I knew that the ref wasn't going to stop it that early. He was covering up well. I wanted some punches to connect, some elbows to get in there, so I really took my time and thought about where to land them." Lesnar's third title defense came just four months after his return to the octagon following a yearlong bout with diverticulitis, an intestinal malady that threatened his life and forced him to revamp his training and diet. The former professional wrestler and football player adapted without losing the sheer bulk that makes him the toughest physical matchup in the UFC. But he had never faced a fighter with the athleticism and well-rounded skills of Velasquez, who trains at a famed kickboxing academy in San Jose. Velasquez also drew motivation from the chance to become the first Mexican-American heavyweight champion in a major promotion in either MMA or boxing. The UFC returned to the Los Angeles area for the first time in a year with its most anticipated event of the fall. The main event didn't disappoint -- although many fans in the sold-out arena likely didn't expect the result after one round of pyrotechnics in the main event. Velasquez entered the cage to cheers from his Latino fans in Orange County, while Lesnar drew a mix of boos and cheers when the bearded fighter walked to the cage. The first 30 seconds were nonstop action, with both fighters trading haymakers and knees. Lesnar took down Velasquez twice with a loud thump as both fighters hit the ground, but Velasquez eventually pushed Lesnar back against the cage, testing both fighters' strength -- and Velasquez held his own despite giving away 2 inches and roughly 30 pounds to Lesnar. When the punching resumed, Velasquez landed most of the blows. Lesnar stayed in a right-handed stance, but might have had trouble seeing out of his left eye, eventually leading to his stumbles and tumbles against the cage. Earlier, Jake Shields won a contentious split decision over Martin Kampmann in his UFC debut at Honda Center, extending his career winning streak to 15 fights. Matt Hamill beat Tito Ortiz by unanimous decision to keep the former light heavyweight champion winless in the past four years, and Diego Sanchez beat Paulo Thiago by unanimous decision. Although White agreed with the decision, most fans booed when Shields' hand was raised after a slow, largely uneventful fight with Kampmann. Shields (26-4-1) hasn't lost an MMA fight since December 2004, going through eight promotions since that defeat.

White Sox happy to retain, and drink beer from, Crosstown Cup

White Sox happy to retain, and drink beer from, Crosstown Cup

The White Sox had a little fun with the Crosstown Cup trophy after securing it for the third consecutive year.

Well, at least one player did for sure: Left fielder Melky Cabrera, according to first baseman Jose Abreu, drank some beer out of the trophy after the White Sox beat the Cubs, 3-0, Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. 

The White Sox retained the Crosstown Cup by virtue of winning the season series in 2014 (three wins, one loss), splitting in 2015 (three wins, three losses), and assuring themselves of at least a split in 2016 (two wins with two games to play). 

This isn’t like a college football rivalry trophy that gets passed between campuses every year. And baseball players generally aren't keen to over-emphasize four or six games over the course of a 162-game season. 

But the Crosstown Cup is still a trophy, and it’s one White Sox right fielder Adam Eaton appreciated receiving again. 

“Any time you win an award — I don’t care if my grandma gives me an award during checkers, I’m excited,” Eaton said. “I don’t really care. But if you play for anything there’s some extra emphasis there. I definitely do think guys take pride in it for sure. But more pride in it that our side of town is happy with us in that sense that we’ve taken the cup back. 

“You don’t want to put too much emphasis on any particular series. But at the same time, if it makes our fans happy that we got the cup back then that’s what we do.”

 

 

 

 

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

Bears approaching 2016 with change in attitude

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – When John Fox succeeded Marc Trestman as Bears coach early last year, at the top of his to-do list was changing what was a palpable losing culture that had come to hang over the organization and Halas Hall. That involved changes of personnel, practices and even to the point of placing an emphasis on winning preseason games, not simply treating them as evaluation exercises.

This year, attitude adjustment is the least of his concerns. Besides the improvements even amid a season that ended 6-10 but was within a pair of missed field goals of going past .500, the additions of critical players have brought with them exactly what Fox wants, beginning with inside linebacker Danny Trevathan, bringing a Super Bowl ring from the Denver Broncos.

“I’ve experienced a lot of new attitudes here the past few years,” said guard Kyle Long. “This is above and beyond my favorite attitude that we’ve adopted.

“People throw the word ‘culture’ around, [but] it’s just taking pride in what you’re doing. You don’t get paid to play. You get paid to win. I’ve heard John Fox say that a million times and I’m sure I’ll hear him say it 2 million times this year.”

Culture means nothing unless it translates into wins because of a collective mindset. Trevathan, linebacker Jerrell Freeman, defensive lineman Akiem Hicks, offensive linemen Ted Larsen and Bobbie Massie – all came from going to the playoffs at least twice in the past four years, Freeman and Trevathan three times.

The change was particularly evident during offseason sessions when members of the defense worked at a practice level that initially irritated some on offense, with coaches even joining in the chirping.

“I’m all about attitude and hustle and just playing ball,” said Trevathan. “I don’t care what happened before. You can always make up for it, just go 100 miles per hour and have fun.

“This game is short. Your attitude carries over to the team. There’s a lot of time when a team’s down you put your head down. I hate that. Even if we’re down we’re going to fight until the end. That’s what it’s all about, having that band of brothers and that attitude and going to, I won’t say ‘war,’ but going out there and battling together.”

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!

One word that surfaced from multiple players during offseason sessions was “hungry.” That was not something that was heard even as recent as last season despite the change in coaches. Without that as a starting attitude, mediocrity was not surprising in recent seasons.

“I think with this group the thing that kind of stands out is just how good a group a group of guys it is, and how important football is to them,” said quarterback Jay Cutler.

“I think you look at OTAs and you look at minicamp and you saw how competitive offense and defense and even special teams were. There weren’t any days where guys were laying off of it. Every single day, guys were getting after it trying to get better, and the competition level I felt was extremely high for being in OTAs and minicamp. Whether that’s gonna translate to wins, I guess we’ll have to wait and see.”

Bears open 2016 training camp with Pernell McPhee, two others on PUP list

Bears open 2016 training camp with Pernell McPhee, two others on PUP list

The 2015 Bears training camp began with rookie wide receiver Kevin White hampered by what would eventually become a season-ending stress fracture of his leg. The 2016 Bears will have White back in uniform but they will start training camp without one of the linchpins of their defense, placing rush-linebacker Pernell McPhee on the physically unable to perform list after he had offseason surgery on his left knee and did not participate in on-field work through final OTA’s and minicamp.

Additionally, the Bears announced that recently signed guard Amini Silatolu, coming off ACL surgery surgery, will also open camp on PUP, along with wide receiver Marquess Wilson, who injured his foot during organized team activities last month.

McPhee, the primary free-agency signing by GM Ryan Pace last offseason, was third on the Bears with six sacks but played a decreasing percentage of defensive sacks as last season wore on. He was deactivated for the St. Louis and Washington games, returned but played no more than 27 snaps in any of the final three games.

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!

The Bears worked to have him drop upwards of 10 pounds after playing last season at his then-customary mid-280s. That part of the program for McPhee was a success.

“He came in [at] a really good weight right now, really good shape right now,” Pace said. “We just got to acclimate himself into football activities so he’ll work with the trainers. … I know he’s been working hard over the summer so that’s very encouraging. And really in the OTAs, he wasn’t doing a lot of football stuff. He was doing stuff more on the side with our strength and conditioning coaches.”

McPhee is unlikely to play in preseason games although the Bears will not make that decision until closer to the start of games.