Was Red Sox manager affected by pain meds?


Was Red Sox manager affected by pain meds?

From Comcast SportsNet
BOSTON (AP) -- As the Boston Red Sox disintegrated in what would become the worst September collapse in baseball history, some at Fenway Park grew concerned that the pain medication Terry Francona was taking after a half-dozen procedures on his knee was affecting his ability to manage, according to a report in the Boston Globe. In a 2,500-word, front-page article headlined, "Inside the Collapse," the newspaper spread the blame on all sides: apathetic players eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games; a general manager who squandered a 161 million budget on underperformers; ownership that thought players could be bought off with 300 headphones and a party on John Henry's 164-foot yacht, "Iroquois." But the most salacious revelations involved Francona, who left the team after the season when his contract options were not picked up. Since then, reports have surfaced about the dysfunction in a Red Sox clubhouse that produced a 7-20 record in September to turn what had been a once comfortable lead in the playoff race into an early offseason. According to the Globe, team sources "expressed concern that Francona's performance may have been affected by the use of pain medication." The sources were not identified, the article said, saying those interviewed feared for their jobs or their relationships inside the organization. The article also said Francona was worried about his son and son-in-law, who are Marine officers serving in Iraq. At the same time, Francona was living in a hotel, separated from his wife of more than 30 years. Responding to the allegations that he was "distracted," Francona noted that he was dealing with the same problems during the four-month period when the team was going 80-41. Francona's ill health was no secret -- he was taken to the hospital with chest pains from Yankee Stadium in 2005 -- and he said he was taking the medication after multiple knee operations and at least five procedures to drain blood from his knee. "It makes me angry that people say these things because I've busted my (butt) to be the best manager I can be," Francona told the paper. "I wasn't terribly successful this year, but I worked harder and spent more time at the ballpark this year than I ever did." Francona and second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who declined to assign blame for the collapse, were the only individuals who were willing to discuss the team's clubhouse culture on the record. (Designated hitter David Ortiz also commented, but said, "I don't feel like talking about it anymore.") Francona told the paper that he confirmed with team Dr. Larry Ronan that he did not have a problem with drug abuse. "I went and saw the proper people and it was not an issue," Francona said. "It never became an issue, and anybody who knew what was going on knows that." If Francona was distracted, he was not alone. A hastily scheduled day-night doubleheader to avoid Hurricane Irene angered players, who complained that management cared more about the money from ticket sales than winning. Sensing the "lingering resentment," the article said, ownership threw a players-only party on Henry's yacht and gave each player a pair of expensive headphones. Pitchers Josh Beckett, Clay Buchholz, John Lackey and Wakefield also appeared -- in their uniforms, in front of the Green Monster -- in a music video for a country song, "Hell yeah, I like beer." Henry did not know about the appearance, he has said, and it is more troublesome when coupled with reports that Beckett, Lackey and Jon Lester were among those who would eat fried chicken, drink beer and play video games in the clubhouse during games, instead of being in the dugout with their teammates. "The guys that weren't down on the bench, I wanted them down on the bench," Francona said recently. "I wanted them to support their teammates."

Cubs-Indians World Series matchup makes things awkward for Jason Kipnis' family, friends

Cubs-Indians World Series matchup makes things awkward for Jason Kipnis' family, friends

When the Cubs defeated the Dodgers to advance to the World Series it put Indians infielder Jason Kipnis, his family and friends all in a very strange situation. The Northbrook, Ill. native and lifelong Cubs fan suddenly faced an inner struggle of how to react.

"The 10-year-old boy in me is saying, 'Why does it have to be the Cubs?'", Kipnis told Cleveland.com on Sunday.

"I even teared up because I didn't know how to handle it," Kipnis said. "I didn't know what to think."

Many of Kipnis' friends are Cubs season-ticket holders and his three siblings also have allegiance to the Cubbies. Torn between choosing her littler brother or her favorite team, Kipnis' older sister Amanda attempted to explain herself on Facebook.

Sooo, I'm going to a Cubbies World Series at Wrigley Freaking Field, and my little brother is playing for the other...

Posted by Amanda Kipnis on Saturday, October 22, 2016

The Cubs start out the series in Cleveland, but when Kipnis and the Indians head to Wrigley Field as the series shifts to Chicago, you know things are only going to get even more complicated for his family members and closest friends.




Michal Rozsival returns to Blackhawks lineup against Flames

Michal Rozsival returns to Blackhawks lineup against Flames

Corey Crawford will start and Michal Rozsival will play in his first game of the season as the Blackhawks face the Calgary Flames at the United Center.

Rozsival looks to be in for fellow Czech Michal Kempny tonight.

“We want to get everyone in at some point. We don’t want to wait too long to get him into the season here,” coach Joel Quenneville said of Rozsival. “He can be useful, he gives us some experience, he can play minutes against top guys, be useful on both units if you need him. He’s been practicing well; looking forward to getting him in.”

The Flames, who have a few familiar faces in the lineup – former Blackhawks Troy Brouwer, Kris Versteeg and Michal Frolik, have struggled to start the season. They’re currently 1-4-1 in their first six games, allowing 4.3 goals per game.

“We have to lean on each other in this room, we have to trust each other in this room, know there’s good players, trust in the system. We know that our system is what’s going to be our rock to fall back on. If we get ourselves in trouble, make a mistake, everyone has to trust that everyone will do their jobs on the ice,” Brouwer said. “With that, too, we have to have confidence in ourselves. It’s been a bit of a rocky start and it’s not where we want to be and we’re playing some tough teams here. But we have to have confidence in ourselves and go out there and limit our mistakes, really.”

Calgary’s power play has been particularly rough (1 for 25). It’ll be facing a Blackhawks’ penalty kill that’s trying to reverse early problems (12 goals allowed on 21 opportunities).

“We’ve done some good things on the kill, we’ve been good at times. It just fell through at others,” Tyler Motte said. “We have to build off what we can, make sure our structure is there and continue to battle and we’ll get it going here.”


  • Artem Anisimov was named the NHL’s second star of the week. Anisimov had four goals and three assists in three games last week.
  • Vinnie Hinostroza is expected to be a healthy scratch for the third consecutive game.


7:30 p.m.


Radio: WGN

Chicago Blackhawks

Tyler Motte-Jonathan Toews-Richard Panik

Artemi Panarin-Artem Anisimov-Patrick Kane

Ryan Hartman-Nick Schmaltz-Marian Hossa

Dennis Rasmussen-Marcus Kruger-Jordin Tootoo


Duncan Keith-Brian Campbell

Michal Rozsival-Brent Seabrook

Gustav Forsling-Niklas Hjalmarsson


Corey Crawford


INJURIES: Trevor van Riemsdyk (upper body), Andrew Desjardins (lower body)


Calgary Flames

Johnny Gaudreau-Sean Monahan-Alex Chiasson

Kris Versteeg-Sam Bennett-Troy Brouwer

Lance Bouma-Mikael Backlund-Michal Frolik

Micheal Ferland-Matt Stajan-Freddie Hamilton


Mark Giordano-Dennis Wideman

T.J. Brodie- Deryk Engelland

Jyrki Jokipakka-Dougie Hamilton


Brian Elliott