Wheaton Warrenville South reloads for 2012

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Wheaton Warrenville South reloads for 2012

Looking to get a preview of the 2012 high school football season in Illinois?

Circle Wednesday, June 27, on your calendar. That's when Wheaton Warrenville South will host the 16-team Red Grange Classic, a 7-on-7 competition that will feature most of the top-rated programs in the state in Class 7A and 8A.

The participants are Wheaton Warrenville South, Montini, Bolingbrook, Maine South, Glenbard West, East St. Louis, Naperville North, Naperville Central, Wheaton North, Batavia, Elk Grove, Lincoln-Way East, Simeon, Hubbard, New Trier and Lyons.

The winner will qualify for the national 7-on-7 tournament in Hoover, Alabama, in July. Last year, Maine South defeated Montini in the inaugural event that featured eight teams.

In addition, while some of the state's leading passers, receivers and defensive backs will engage in 22-minute contests, the linemen will compete in an eight-event challenge. The 16 schools will participate in a 7-on-7 competition at Wheaton North at the sophomore level.

"Nationally, 7-on-7 is becoming a big thing competitively," Wheaton Warrenville South coach Ron Muhitch said, noting that Illinois-bound Aaron Bailey of defending Class 8A champion Bolingbrook and Northwestern-bound Matt Alviti of Maine South will be two of the highly rated quarterbacks who will be showcased at the June 27 event. "It is good to teach the passing game and pass defense."

It will give Muhitch an opportunity to begin evaluating his stable of quarterback candidates to see if he has another Reilly O'Toole in the making. They are senior-to-be Don McKee and juniors-to-be Ryan Graham, Alex Wills, Barrett Davis and Casey Paraday, a transfer from Springdale, Arkansas.

Last year, Muhitch's quarterback corps was riddled with injuries and he was forced to bring up a sophomore to start in the state championship game. After an 0-2 start, losing to highly rated Glenbard West and Maine South, WW South rallied to finish 10-4, losing to unbeaten Rockford Boylan in the Class 7A final.

He has a knack for filling in the blanks, solving problems and finding the right players to fit into the right positions. In 10 years, he has won 84 percent (106-21) of his games. The Tigers won state titles in 2006, 2009 and 2010 and finished second in 2007 and 2011. In the last seven years, they have lost only nine games, four last year.

Muhitch expects more of the same in 2012. He returns his entire offensive line, including 6-foot-4, 265-pound tackle Frank Garcia, 6-foot-5, 250-pound tackle Kyle Joyce and 6-foot-5, 225-pound tight end Brian Welch. "When I have that, life is good. The group has been together for two years. I see some good things," the coach said.

"The key is this summer we will do a lot of soul-searching to find kids for right spots. We need to find a running back (to replace Northwestern-bound Dan Vitale) and a quarterback and complementary receivers."

Muhitch doesn't plan to change his multiple offense. Once again, he will spread the field. Last year, he gave the ball to Vitale. This year, he will give the ball to senior-to-be Brandan Adams, who didn't play much last season, or 6-foot-3, 210-pound Josh Wilson, who played at Mount Carmel as a freshman and Downers Grove North as a sophomore.

The defense needs a complete overhaul. Muhitch already has shifted some offensive players to fill holes in the defense. Hollis Henry, a 6-foot-3, 225-pounder, has moved from left guard to rush end. Muhitch is optimistic about 6-foot-2, 260-pound defensive lineman Dan Chism, who saw little playing time last year because of a knee injury, and safety Kevin Giltz. But he is looking for linebackers.

WW South's best player and best athlete is wide receiver Corey Davis, a 6-foot-3, 200-pounder whose brother Titus came on strong as a senior and was Rookie of the Year in the Mid-American Conference last year at Central Michigan. Muhitch predicts the same storyline for Corey, who also returns punts and kickoffs.

"Corey should be one of the best players in the class of 2013, one of the best receivers in the Chicago area," Muhitch said. "He has been an up-and-coming athlete for the last two years. Nobody knew much about his brother but he had a great senior year for us. I see the same storyline for Corey."

Another good storyline is kicker Jesse Padalik, who follows in a line of former WW South stars Dan Conroy (Michigan State), Nick Campos (Indiana) and Nick Immekus (Illinois). "He is as good a kicker as Conroy and as good a punter as Campos," Muhitch said.

But the schedule hasn't changed. WW South opens at Glenbard West, then hosts Maine South in Week 2. It won't be easy, of course, but Muhitch is hoping to improve on last year's 0-2 start.

Bears severly outplayed in another home preseason game

Bears severly outplayed in another home preseason game

It's easy to dismiss preseason games, but they can't be ignored when a team is severely outplayed in every sense of the word.

That was the case for the Bears on Saturday afternoon as they were dismantled by the Kansas City Chiefs, 23-7, in front of a crowd of 48, 377 at Soldier Field to remain winless on the preseason.

The Bears starting offense compiled a net of 65 yards as they couldn't find a rhythm against a Chiefs defense playing without Pro Bowlers' Justin Houston, Eric Berry and Tamba Hali.

Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was able to stay upright for most of the game as the starting offensive line allowed just two sacks, but Cutler was plagued by a few drops from his receivers and was off target for most of the afternoon, finishing 6/15 with 45 yards and a passer rating of 47.9. The Bears starting wide receiving tandem of Alshon Jeffery and Kevin White registered the same amount of drops (three) as they did receptions. The lone highlight from the starting offensive unit came from second-year running Jeremy Langford who twice turned broken plays into positive gains, showing a remarkable improvement in that facet from his rookie season.

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While the starting offensive unit will draw much-deserved criticism for their performance against the Chiefs, the defense didn't fare that much better.

The starting 11, playing without Pernell McPhee and Kyle Fuller, allowed 239 total yards in the first half. The starting unit also lost their only proven cornerback when eight-year veteran Tracy Porter entered the NFL's concussion protocol after taking a knee to the head by teammate Harold Jones-Quartey in the second quarter. 

Despite Saturday's mediocre play by the defense, there were some positives including the first NFL interception by Bears rookie cornerback Deiondre' Hall who looks to be squarely in the mix for a starting cornerback job with the abundance of injuries at the position. Rookie defensive tackle Jonathan Bullard also continued his strong preseason play with another sack. First-rounder Leonard Floyd suited up but didn't play due to a hamstring injury.

The Bears finally broke a near 55-minute scoring drought when third-string quarterback Connor Shaw connected with wide receiver Cameron Meredith for a 16-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. Shaw suffered a left ankle injury on the next series and had to leave on a cart. He finished the game 5/6 for 65 yards and a touchdown, also adding 15 rushing yards on two carries.

In two preseason home games the Bears have been outscored 45-7. They were blanked by the Denver Broncos back in Week 1 on Aug. 15.

The Bears will look to avoid going winless for the first time in franchise history in preseason when they close out their exhibition slate against the Browns in Cleveland next Thursday.

Bears great Jay Hilgenberg to new C Cornelius Edison: “You deserve to be there”

Bears great Jay Hilgenberg to new C Cornelius Edison: “You deserve to be there”

The storyline has already been formed: If the Bears are forced to go with undrafted Cornelius Edison as their center, the 2016 season is lost.

“I mean, how ridiculous to think that an undrafted free agent could be the starting center for the Chicago Bears, and they win,” deadpanned Jay Hilgenberg, making less than no attempt to mask the irony in his voice.

With very good reason.

Because Hilgenberg himself came into the NFL as an afterthought, undrafted out of Iowa in 1981 and then going on to an 11-year career with the Bears, capped by a Super Bowl ring in 1985. Seven Pro Bowls, five All-Pro selections.

Ridiculous.

Edison may come nowhere near the heights reached by Hall of Fame nominee Hilgenberg. Or of Hall of Fame Miami center Jim Langer, also undrafted. But Hilgenberg has a strong bit of advice for Edison, who started Saturday in the Bears preseason game vs. Kansas City and could be their starter on Opening Day, depending on health elsewhere on the interior of the Bears offensive line.

“I would say to him, ‘You’re in an NFL camp because you can play football,’” Hilgenberg told CSNChicago.com. “Don’t let how you entered that camp take anything away from you. You deserve to be there. You just need to prove it a little bit more than the first-rounders.’”

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It may not always be easy, of course.

Hilgenberg, who fought his way onto the final roster in 1981, once famously turned to then-teammate Revie Sorey on the bench during a blowout of the Bears in Hilgenberg’s first season, and said, “Revie, we’re the worst team in the NFL.”

Sorey, never one to duck the truth, nodded.

Hilgenberg added, “And I’m the worst player on this team.”

Again, no disagreement from Sorey.

“So that makes me the worst player in the NFL, doesn’t it?” Hilgenberg concluded.

Silence from Sorey.

Hilgenberg turned out to not be the worst player in the NFL, but not without epic struggles, and he knows what Edison will be going through. And how the young center can make it.

[MORE BEARS: Rookie class making much-needed impact]

“To be honest there is always a little insecurity in you,” Hilgenberg recalled. “I had confidence that I belonged but I had to fight every day. And the truth is, I wanted it more than anything else in the world. I was going to make it.

“I didn’t have Plan B. I didn’t want to go back to Iowa then, so I didn’t have Plan B.

Hilgenberg used teams’ not drafting him as motivation, and Bears teammates recalled him savoring facing supposed elite defensive linemen, No. 1 picks, and handling them. Beyond his attitude, however, was a method.

“I played against a lot of big, strong guys in the NFL, and I wasn’t going to back down from anybody,” Hilgenberg said. “As soon as you learn how to play with the right fundamentals, you learn that there’s no Supermen out there. If you can play fundamentally and with good technique, you can block anybody… .

“Offensive line play is honestly all about how bad you want it. How much are you willing to do? How important is it to you? What does it mean to you?”

Edison is in the process of answering those exact questions.

Dwyane Wade's cousin shot and killed in Chicago

Dwyane Wade's cousin shot and killed in Chicago

On Thursday, Dwyane Wade appeared on an ESPN special for The Undefeated to talk about gun violence. The next day, Wade's cousin was shot and killed in Chicago.

Nykea Aldridge was pushing a baby stroller in the Chicago neighborhood of Parkway Gardens when she was shot and killed. Aldridge was 32 and a mother of four.

Police said she was not the intended target and one person was taken into custody as a result of the incident.

Wade's words during his appearance on the ESPN panel took on extra meaning after Friday's shooting.

"It's important for all of us to help each other, to go back and say 'You know what, where did this start, how did this start? Let's see how we can change there,'" Wade said on ESPN. "It's deep-rooted and this is something that didn't start today. This is something that's not going to end tomorrow. But this is something that we can start a conversation, we can start the work today and hopefully eventually we can stop it."

Wade tweeted after the shooting.