Why 4 athletes received lifetime bans


Why 4 athletes received lifetime bans

From Comcast SportsNet
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- South Korea's volleyball association announced the banning of four players for life Monday over their alleged involvement in a match-fixing scandal. Three players from the KEPCO45 team and one from the military club Sangmu allegedly took bribes in return for trying to rig the results of games in recent years, an official at the Korean Volleyball Federation told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity, citing department rules. Prosecutors investigating the scandal recently told the federation the players confessed to their wrongdoing during questioning, the official said. The players will be banned from appearing in games and assuming official volleyball-related jobs, he said. Another player with the Samsung Bluefangs club, who has voluntarily admitted to his involvement in the scandal, was temporarily suspended until a prosecution probe is finalized, the official said. The Defense Ministry said Monday it has decided to bar its Sangmu team from taking part in the ongoing professional volleyball league. At least seven people, including two retired KEPCO45 players and a gambling broker, have been investigated over the scandal and five of them have been arrested by prosecutors, according to the official and a prosecution office at the southeastern city of Daegu. The broker allegedly placed bets on an illegal online gambling website after the results were arranged, officials at the Daegu prosecution office said. It's not known whether all the players implicated in the scandal received bribes from the same broker. Last year, South Korea's football league was hit by a massive match-fixing scandal, with nearly 80 players and brokers convicted.

Indians expect to bounce back from sloppy World Series Game 2 loss to Cubs

Indians expect to bounce back from sloppy World Series Game 2 loss to Cubs

CLEVELAND -- Their pitchers walked eight Cubs hitters. The offense didn’t manage a hit off Jake Arrieta until the sixth inning. And the defense was a wreck.

For the first time all postseason, the Cleveland Indians looked uncharacteristically sloppy on Wednesday night. But shortly after a 5-1 loss to the Cubs in Game 2 of the World Series in front of 38,172 at Progressive Field, the Indians said they’d quickly turn the page on only their second postseason loss. The teams split the opening pair and will workout on Thursday before returning to action on Friday night in Game 3 at Wrigley Field.

“We gave up nine hits, eight walks, two errors, and we only gave up five runs,” Cleveland manager Terry Francona said. “We’re probably pretty fortunate because there was traffic all night. For us to win, we generally need to play a clean game, and we didn’t do that.”

Cleveland would be best served to erase Wednesday’s contest from the memory banks entirely.

A rough all-around evening began in the top of the first inning when Indians right fielder Lonnie Chisenhall threw to second base instead of hitting the cutoff man on Anthony Rizzo’s one-out double, which allowed Kris Bryant to score on a potentially close play at the plate. It represented the Cubs’ first World Series lead since they won Game 6 of the 1945 Fall Classic on a 12th-inning RBI double by Stan Hack.

Four innings later, Chisenhall slipped on Ben Zobrist’s RBI triple into the right-field corner as the Cubs began to pull away. Kipnis also committed the first of his two errors later in the fifth inning, which led to a run. And Kipnis dropped a relay throw from Francisco Lindor in an attempt to get a force out in the seventh inning -- “I cost him a top-10 highlight,” Kipnis said.

The Indians only committed one error in their previous nine postseason games before Kipnis doubled that output on Wednesday.

“It was a bad game, for me at least,” Kipnis said. “I’ve had ‘em before. I’ll have a short memory on it. It’s not the end of the world. That one (error) cost us a run. The other one didn’t. All I can do is have a short memory and move on.”

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The bloody finger-incident aside, starting pitcher Trevor Bauer only had one shorter start (Aug. 3 versus Minnesota) all season than he did in Game 2. Cubs hitters worked deep counts early on to drive up Bauer’s pitch count to 51 after only two innings. Ahead 1-0, the Cubs took advantage of a two-out walk in the third by Anthony Rizzo when Bauer couldn’t put the slugger away despite getting ahead 0-2 in the count. Zobrist and Kyle Schwarber followed with singles to make it a 2-0 game.

Bauer, who lasted 3 2/3 innings, walked two as did relievers Bryan Shaw and Danny Salazar, though the latter hadn’t pitched since Sept. 9. The performance was atypical for a staff that brought a 1.58 postseason ERA into the game.

“We've been able to do (bounce back) all year,” Bauer said. “We've had guys go down, guys have bad starts, good starts. Someone struggles at the plate and someone picks it up. That's what a good team does.”

The Indians had one early opportunity against Cubs starter Jake Arrieta and didn’t take advantage. Arrieta issued a pair of two-out walks in the first inning, but Jose Ramirez just missed on a 3-1 fastball and flew out to deep center.

Despite what Joe Maddon described as “scattered” command, Arrieta held Cleveland hitless until Kipnis doubled with one out in the sixth. By that time, the Indians trailed 5-0. Kipnis advanced on a grounder and scored on a wild pitch. But Mike Montgomery and Aroldis Chapman combined to strike out six in 3 1/3 scoreless innings after Arrieta exited.

Napoli said he thinks the Indians would shake off only their second loss in 10 playoff games.

“We're a confident group,” Napoli said. “We didn't think we were just going to come in here and steamroll the Cubs. They're a great ball club. We're going to sleep this one off and get off to a good workout tomorrow and get back after it again.”

Jake Arrieta brings his A-game as Cubs even up World Series

Jake Arrieta brings his A-game as Cubs even up World Series

CLEVELAND — The Cubs are a team that can make it hard to focus with so many big-money players running around, so much young talent bubbling up, all of Joe Maddon’s antics and ultimately so many different ways to beat their opponent.

That’s how Jake Arrieta going for a no-hitter in the World Series sort of became an afterthought on Wednesday night at Progressive Field. After getting shut out in Game 1, the Cubs lineup kept extending innings, making these Cleveland Indians pitchers work. Kyle Schwarber’s at-bats are becoming must-see TV more than six months after shredding his left knee. Honestly, Arrieta hasn’t been giving off that same best-pitcher-on-the-planet aura.

But this is exactly what a Cy Young Award winner is supposed to do, taking a no-hitter into the sixth inning, shutting down the Indians in a 5-1 win and tying up this Fall Classic before Wrigley Field stages its first World Series game in 71 years on Friday night.

Arrieta had a 1-0 lead before he threw his first pitch in Game 2, working around back-to-back walks to Francisco Lindor and Mike Napoli in the first inning and breathing a sigh of relief when Jose Ramirez drove a flyball out to the warning track in center field. Instead of those command issues signaling trouble, Arrieta got locked back in, retiring eight batters in a row from there, and 13 of the next 14, the Indians managing only two hits in the sixth inning.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

If the Indians are planning to start Cy Young Award winner Corey Kluber two more times on short rest in this best-of-seven matchup — and unleash lefty reliever Andrew Miller at the most crucial moments — then the Cubs will need Arrieta to pitch like an ace.

Mission accomplished, even though Arrieta didn’t put a third no-hitter on his resume. Jason Kipnis — the Glenbrook North High School graduate who grew up a Cubs fan — ended Arrieta’s no-hit bid with one out in the sixth inning. Kipnis hit a ball into right-center field and hustled for a double, sliding headfirst into second base and eventually scoring on an Arrieta wild pitch.

Maddon gave Arrieta one more batter and pulled him after 98 pitches. If there were times last year where it felt like Arrieta had to be a one-man team, the Cubs now have an unrelenting lineup, the best defense in the game and a multidimensional bullpen, more than enough to win their first World Series since 1908.