Why Super Bowl halftime show was controversial

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Why Super Bowl halftime show was controversial

From Comcast SportsNet
The NFL and a major television network are apologizing for another Super Bowl halftime show. There was no wardrobe malfunction, nothing like that glimpse of Janet Jackson's nipple eight years ago that caused an uproar and a government scrutiny. Instead, it was an extended middle finger from British singer M.I.A. during Sunday night's performance of Madonna's new single, "Give Me All Your Luvin.'" In front of some 110 million viewers on NBC and uncounted others online, she flipped the bird and appeared to sing, "I don't give a (expletive)" at one point, though it was hard to hear her clearly. The NFL and NBC wasted little time in responding. "The obscene gesture in the performance was completely inappropriate, very disappointing and we apologize to our fans," said Brian McCarthy, spokesman for the NFL, which produced Madonna's halftime show. The risque moment came during the biggest TV event of the year. The screen briefly went blurred after M.I.A.'s gesture in what was a late attempt -- by less than a second -- to cut out the camera shot. "The NFL hired the talent and produced the halftime show," NBC spokesman Christopher McCloskey said. "Our system was late to obscure the inappropriate gesture and we apologize to our viewers." Jackson's infamous oops during the 2004 halftime show raised a storm of controversy and put CBS in hot water with the Federal Communications Commission amid questions about the responsibility of TV networks to police their airwaves. Justin Timberlake ripped off Jackson's bustier, exposing her breast for nine-sixteenths of a second, a moment for which CBS was fined 550,000 by the FCC. The network challenged the fine and last fall, a federal appeals court ruled against the FCC despite an order from the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case. The three-judge panel reviewed three decades of FCC rulings and concluded the agency was changing its policy, without warning, by fining CBS for fleeting nudity. This year's game, in which the New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 21-17, is expected to challenge last year's record of being the most-watched U.S. TV event ever. M.I.A. is best known for her 2007 hit "Paper Planes," a Grammy nominee for record of the year that memorably features a sample of the Clash song, "Straight to Hell." It was featured on the soundtrack to the movie "Slumdog Millionaire." After the incident, McCarthy said that M.I.A. had not done anything similar during rehearsals and the league had no reason to believe she would pull something like that during the actual show. Madonna had admittedly been nervous about her performance, hoping to position herself as the queen of a new generation of pop stars with an opulent show and a sharp performance that mixed her new release with more familiar songs. She seemed like Roman royalty when muscle-bound men carried her extravagant throne across the football field to the stage for her opening song, "Vogue." Guests Cee Lo, Nicki Minaj and dance rockers LMFAO also appeared with Madonna. The singing and dancing on "Vogue" was smartly choreographed, as Madonna moved more deliberately -- she is 53 -- but still adroitly. She briefly appeared to stumble at one point while trying to make a step on the stage set, but recovered in time. She let a tightrope walker make the more acrobatic moves during a performance of "Music." Madonna carried gold pompons for a performance of her frothy new single. Twitter was alight with questions about the vocals being lip synched or augmented by tapes, particularly during this song. The best guest was clearly Cee Lo, who joined Madonna for the final song, "Like a Prayer." They were joined by a robed chorus in the show's most soaring performance. With a puff of white smoke, Madonna disappeared down a trapdoor in the stage, and lights on the field spelled out "World Peace." The performance was also carried live on SiriusXM Radio, giving Madonna the biggest single audience of her career. For all the elaborate choreography and flashy effects, the finger incident is the more likely headline from the event. Earlier, Kelly Clarkson, Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert offered some pregame patriotism. Shelton and Lambert did a twangy duet on "America the Beautiful" and Clarkson, in a simple black dress, sang "The Star Spangled Banner" without a hitch after last year's performer, Christina Aguilera, flubbed a line.

Chris Sale 'got it all squared' away with White Sox teammates, coaches

Chris Sale 'got it all squared' away with White Sox teammates, coaches

MINNEAPOLIS — He hasn’t yet made any inroads on the charitable end of the throwback jersey ordeal, but Chris Sale has addressed his teammates and coaches.

The White Sox pitcher said Saturday afternoon he’d look more into a potential charity benefit involving the destroyed 1976 throwback jerseys from a week ago in the near future. As for the more prominent topic, Sale, who is scheduled to pitch again Wednesday in Detroit, said he spoke to the White Sox after Thursday night’s game against the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

"Got it all squared away," Sale said. "Got on the same page. We are back to where we were before, trying to win games. Putting that in the forefront.

"I got my point across. I said the things I wanted to say, and you move forward."

Both Sale and White Sox manager Robin Ventura described the discussion as good and stressed they’re ready to move forward. Sale told MLB.com on Monday he thought Ventura needed to do a better job supporting his players. Asked if they have a good relationship, Ventura said yes but didn’t go into detail about what the two discussed.

"I had a long talk with him," Ventura said. "We continue to move on, and it’s about baseball. That’s part of the professional part of it.

"It was good. I’m not going to get into what we talked about, but we had a long talk and it was good."

Sale said he spoke to everyone individually, including Ventura. He also reiterated he thinks the story has been blown out of proportion.

"I talked to everybody involved personally one on one," Sale said. "Cleared the air, had some good talks. Learned some things. Talked about some things we already knew. It was good. It was very productive.

"I think everyone is making a little bit bigger deal of this. Ten or 15 years ago, this wouldn’t have been a story. There was no such thing as Twitter, and I don’t think as much information leaked out as it does nowadays. It’s just something that people gravitate to. It’s the nature of the beast — I understand that.

"As much as I don’t like it, I can’t be mad it. It is what it is. You move forward and keep a positive mind frame and come in every day with the same mindset."

As for the jerseys and their future, Sale said he plans to determine the best way to proceed forward when the team returns home from this eight-game road trip. He credits his wife, Brianne, for the suggestion that some good come from an incident that resulted in his five-game suspension.

"She’s the smart one in the house apparently," Sale said. "She brought it up, and it came to my attention it could be possible. So any time something bad happens like what happened, you always try to find something positive. If we can make a positive out of negative, it’s perfect. Works out well."

Bears Camp Shorts: Leonard Floyd debuts, front-7 goes on the attack

Bears Camp Shorts: Leonard Floyd debuts, front-7 goes on the attack

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – Leonard Floyd, sidelined by illness almost as soon as Thursday’s first practice began, was in full pads on Saturday, with coaches limiting his workload and with the kind of mixed results usually associated with rookies.

The rush linebacker, working primarily with the No. 3 defense, set a defensive edge and flashed in a stop of running back Senorise Perry. But Floyd struggled in some of his pass drops and followed a play fake and lost containment on one quarterback rollout in team sessions.

Floyd likely dropped some pounds over the course of week with a stomach virus but “Leonard is exceptionally quick and explosive,” said coach John Fox. “We saw that on tape as a college player and all through the OTAs. A lot was made of his weight but that takes care of itself. He’s just a good football player”….

[RELATED: Bears agree to extension with Willie Young]

…The defense has wanted more pass rush from its down-linemen and has seen just that from Akiem Hicks in the early camp going. Hicks overwhelmed rookie guard Cody Whitehair with a bull rush in a two-man pass-protection drill, and Hicks again was in the face of quarterback Jay Cutler during team sessions, combining with Mitch Unrein for one simulated sack and breaking in solo for another.

“Somebody told me [Cutler] said, 'Do that in pads,'” Hicks said of his Friday encounter with the quarterback. “He said that yesterday when I got him and then today I got him in pads, and he didn't say much”….

Lamarr Houston was involved in the first dust-up of camp as he and guard Ted Larsen engaged in post-whistle hostilities. But the rush linebacker also was involved in myriad impact plays ranging from coming clean for a simulated sack in pass-rush work to stacking up two different run plays in team...

Brian Matusz will be spot starter in Cubs' series finale vs. Mariners

Brian Matusz will be spot starter in Cubs' series finale vs. Mariners

Joe Maddon is giving his five starting pitchers an extra day's rest.

Brian Matusz will be a spot starter in the Cubs' series finale against the Seattle Mariners on Sunday night at Wrigley Field. The Cubs optioned reliever Justin Grimm to Triple-A as a corresponding move.

"We'll use that day however we need to to the best of our abilities," said Jake Arrieta. "We'll find a way to use that day to get some work done and get better and move forward. At this time of year, every one of us might need to refine something.

"It actally might not be a bad idea. Hopefully Matusz is ready to come out and compete and be effective, and we'll move on."

Prior to Saturday's game, Maddon indicated that the club is looking to give his starters more days off.

"As we’ve talked about all along, attempting to try to give our regular five a rest in a particular moment, so we’re considering doing something right now," Maddon said. "We’re not ready to announce it yet just to be honest, but we are considering."

Matusz signed a minor-league deal with the Cubs last month.

The 29-year-old southpaw has spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles. In eight MLB seasons, he is 27-41 with a 4.85 ERA and 460 strikeouts.

As Matusz makes his Cubs debut Sunday, having a familiar face in the clubhouse might help ease any nerves.

"Matusz and I played together for quite a while," said Arrieta, who spent time with Matusz in Baltimore. "I've seen him pitch extremely well his rookie year. He can pitch, he's a smart guy. He's got some really good pitches that he knows how to use effectively. I look forward to watching him pitch and catching up with him."