Word on the Street: Future HOFers back Rose

Word on the Street: Future HOFers back Rose

Tuesday, March 29, 2011
CSNChicago.com

Rose racks up more recommendations

Derrick Rose continues to rack up praise from the leagues top players. Today, two of the league's top veteran point guards, Jason Kidd and Steve Nash, were added to the list of players who believe Rose should be the league MVP.

Derrick is playing extremely well. Hes definitely probably the MVP of this league, Kidd said.

There have not been many point guards to win MVP, Nash said. Derrick has been phenomenal this year. He continues to grow. Hes not only a terrific athlete, but he has turned into a terrific basketball player and hes a great kid. Hes a willing learner, teammate and I have nothing but great things to say about him. (YardBarker)

Two Cubs minor leaguers suspended 50 games

Five minor league players, including two in the Chicago Cubs system, have been suspended for violating the minor league drug policy. Catcher Eric Castillo and pitcher Amalo Reyes, who are on the Cubs' team in the Dominican Summer League, were each suspended for 50 games. Two other free agents, Junior Astacio and Pedro Nunez received similar suspensions and Tony Feliz was banned for failing to take a drug test. (minorleaguebaseball.com)

Boozer rented to Prince?

Apparently Bulls forward Carlos Boozer was once landlord to none other than the artist formerly - and currently - known as Prince.
"They have this award season where they have Grammys and all this other stuff," Boozer said after practice Tuesday. "I had to go to Utah for the season and my realtor was like, 'Yo, there's this guy who wants to rent your house. He saw it before you bought it. We're going to have to lease it.' I was like, 'I'm not leasing my house. I've never done that before.'"The amount of money he was willing to pay made me reconsider. And that's how Prince rented my house out for nine or 10 months." (ChicagoBreakingSports)MLB institutes 7-day DLMajor League Baseball is continuing its efforts to properly address concussions. Today, the league announced that it had instituted a new seven-day disabled list specifically for head injuries.
"I think it's good they're paying more attention to these things because they're seeing the long-term effects concussions can have on players," said Aaron Hill, who sat out four months of the 2008 season with a concussion. "Not just baseball, but all sports. So, it's a good thing they're looking into it." (Yahoo! Sports)Sox make minor moveThe White Sox traded minor league outfielder John Shelby Jr. to the Tampa Bay Rays for future considerations on Tuesday. Shelby, 25, is the son of former major league outfielder John Shelby. In five minor league seasons with the Sox, Shelby Jr. batted .273. (ChicagoBreakingSports)Prior still pitching well

Former Cubs pitcher Mark Prior worked another scoreless inning on Tuesday, dropping his spring ERA with the New York Yankees to an impressive 1.04. Despite his impressive spring, he will likely be headed to the Yankees single-A affiliate to start the season.

After suffering a barrage of injuries over his career, Prior no longer has the velocity that carried him to his great early-career success on the north side. These days, Prior is using a low-90's fastball in conjunction with high-70's off-speed pitches to get the job done. (ChicagoBreakingSports)

Check out this season's second episode of Chicago Fire All Access

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Check out this season's second episode of Chicago Fire All Access

Check out the second episode of the second season of Chicago Fire All Access.

In this episode, the team helps out in the Chicagoland community, talks about finding comfort foods in Chicago and life on the road in the MLS. 

Bears 'horizontal' leadership plan building on some surprising leaders

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Bears 'horizontal' leadership plan building on some surprising leaders

Sometimes you really do have to just appreciate the attitude. Because Bears coaches do, in ways of significance in what kind of team the 2016 Bears will become.

Ka’Deem Carey has been a backup his first two Bears seasons, yet now finds himself with more games played in a Bears uniform than any other Chicago running back. The 2014 fourth-round draft pick accordingly has set one very lofty 2016 objective for himself:

“Just being a leader, really trying to focus on that,” Carey said during the team’s OTA this week. “We’ve still got a young team, I’m vocal, coaches like the way I run the ball, and sometimes the way I play out there, the coaches like that and want to pass that on to teammates.

“So I’m just trying to be a leader to these young guys.”

Somehow the notion of a 23-year-old talking about setting an example for “these” young guys shouldn’t be dismissed. At all. Because Carey is representative of something developing within the current team.

Leadership is a popular, near-annual topic for Bears teams, no less so early this offseason as the 2016 team takes shape without 40 percent of its elected – and veteran – captains from the 2015 season.

Players elect five captains: two for offense, two defense and one special teams. Coach John Fox names a sixth captain each based on merit from the previous week.

The problem for the Bears is that two of the 2015 five elected captains – running back Matt Forte, safety Antrel Rolle – were not brought back by the organization this offseason. Veterans were added in free agency, but headcount does not translate into instant chemistry, cohesion or leadership.

That falls to a Carey to infuse. Elsewhere, guard Matt Slauson, a popular leader in the offensive-line room and huddle, was released, as was left tackle Jermon Bushrod. After just three NFL seasons, Kyle Long abruptly becomes the offensive lineman with more games in a Bears uniform than anyone else in the O-line room.

Indeed, longevity is no criterion whatsoever for a Bears “leadership” role. Teammates elected Pernell McPhee one of the defensive co-captains last year, his first as a Bear. And linebacker Danny Trevathan, brought in from Super Bowl champion Denver, could emerge as one in his first, using precisely the same calling card that McPhee did.

“I'm just going out there and being an example,” Trevathan said. “It's not hard, you know, I've just got to go out and play the game that I know how to play but also get guys to come along and speak and communicate and be on one page with these guys.”

The key is the “horizontal” leadership concept – leading not from a few at the top, but from multiple strong individuals in a leadership layer.

“Obviously missing Matt Slauson, missing guys like Slauson and Forte, there are large voids to be filled,” Long said. “But this team has been built on horizontal leadership and we’ve done a great job bringing in the right people, defensively, offensively and the special teams unit.

“I love the coaches, I love the guys on this team, I don’t think that will be an issue, so I don’t really have to take on that much bigger of a role because of the guys that we have in our room. Everybody is kind of accountable themselves.”

Melo Trimble will return to Terps for junior season

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Melo Trimble will return to Terps for junior season

Well, at least Mark Turgeon won't lose his entire starting lineup.

With four-fifths of Maryland's starting unit already off to the NBA in one fashion or another, Melo Trimble decided to return to the Terps for his junior season, opting to postpone his pro career for at least one more year.

"I am really excited to return for my junior season at Maryland," Trimble said in the team's announcement. "It’s truly special that I get to continue to play in front of my family, friends and our amazing fans. I’m looking forward to working out with my teammates this summer, and I am excited for what we can accomplish. I learned a great deal through this experience, and I am committed to working hard in getting better each day. I’m appreciative of all the support that I have received from coach Turgeon, my family and my teammates throughout this process. I look forward to continuing my education and building upon the success that we have had at Maryland."

Trimble waited an awful long time to make his decision on whether to withdraw from or remain in the NBA Draft, with news of the decision coming out just a couple hours before Wednesday night's deadline.

Trimble had a strong follow up to his sensational freshman season last year, improving as a distributor and as a defender despite a significant dropoff in his scoring and shooting numbers. But he still led the way for a star-studded Maryland team that advanced to the program's first Sweet Sixteen in 13 years.

After averaging 16.2 points per game, shooting 44 percent from the field and 41.2 percent from 3-point range and getting to the free-throw line nearly seven times a game as a freshman, Trimble averaged 14.8 points per game, shot just 41 percent from the field and 31.5 percent from 3-point range and averaged just better than five free throws a game as a sophomore. Still, he earned All-Big Ten First Team honors for the second straight season.

The expectations placed on him and his team were huge. Trimble was the conference preseason player of the year, and the Terps were tabbed as one of the favorites to win the national championship.

A return to school is not without its risks, as a further decline in Trimble's shooting numbers could prove costly for his draft stock. Plus, with many of the stars from last season's team gone, the Terps will enter the season with vastly different expectations, with many questioning whether they'll even make the NCAA tournament.

However, Trimble could be doing exactly what the new rules were designed to do: using better access to information to make the best decision. If NBA teams truly believe he's not ready for the pros, continuing to develop at the college level makes a heck of a lot of sense. Plus, while his stock was high after that freshman season, it no doubt took a hit after his sophomore season and could rocket back up with another big year as a junior.

Plus, Trimble's return means Turgeon doesn't have to go into full-tilt rebuild mode a season removed from one with championship expectations.

"Melo informed me (Wednesday) night that he has decided to return to Maryland for his junior season," Turgeon said. "After gathering information throughout this process, I agree that this is the best decision for him. Melo is a very special person. He is a winner, and his impact on our program has been immeasurable. Melo has an extremely bright future ahead of him both on and off the basketball court. We are excited that he will continue to pursue his degree and build upon his legacy in College Park."